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BUSINESS
January 27, 1991
Virtually everyone agrees that the United States is involved in the Persian Gulf War at least in part because of oil. But what should our energy policy be when the war is over? How can we reduce our dependence on Middle East oil? How should we deal with the region once hostilities are over? Sharon Bernstein interviewed a range of industry leaders and experts, including oil company executives, the head of the nation's largest investor-owned public utility and consumer advocates.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Anthony York
SAN FRANCISCO - Gov. Jerry Brown signed a new pact Monday to formally align California's clean energy policies with those of Oregon, Washington state and British Columbia. The agreement commits all four governments to work toward ways to put a price on carbon pollution, require the use of lower-carbon gasoline and set goals for reducing greenhouse gases across the region. The nonbinding blueprint also sets new targets for electric vehicles - aiming for 10% of all new cars and trucks in the region to be emission-free by 2016 - and calls for the construction of a bullet-train system from Canada to California.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 1992 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As one lawyer for the Natural Resources Defense Council put it, the irony is "glaring and painful." Today, Earth Day 1992, out-of-state coal interests will be here to urge the California Energy Commission to ignore pollution created by energy-generation methods in other states that export electricity to California. Environmental groups will be urging the opposite. "California . . .
BUSINESS
April 22, 1992 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As one lawyer for the Natural Resources Defense Council put it, the irony is "glaring and painful." Today, Earth Day 1992, out-of-state coal interests will be here to urge the California Energy Commission to ignore pollution created by energy-generation methods in other states that export electricity to California. Environmental groups will be urging the opposite. "California . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Anthony York
SAN FRANCISCO - Gov. Jerry Brown signed a new pact Monday to formally align California's clean energy policies with those of Oregon, Washington state and British Columbia. The agreement commits all four governments to work toward ways to put a price on carbon pollution, require the use of lower-carbon gasoline and set goals for reducing greenhouse gases across the region. The nonbinding blueprint also sets new targets for electric vehicles - aiming for 10% of all new cars and trucks in the region to be emission-free by 2016 - and calls for the construction of a bullet-train system from Canada to California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2007 | Jennifer Oldham, Times Staff Writer
The chairman of an Assembly committee that heavily influences California's energy policy announced Saturday that he now opposes construction of an $800-million natural gas processing plant in the ocean about 20 miles off Malibu. Assemblyman Lloyd Levine (D-Van Nuys) said he would fight a terminal proposed by BHP Billiton, one of the largest energy companies in the world, because "it's an environmental problem for the coast."
BUSINESS
June 24, 2005 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
A bipartisan citizens' panel Thursday recommended that the Legislature reject Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's proposal to create a state Department of Energy, dealing a blow to his plan to reorganize the state's tangled energy bureaucracy. Members of the Little Hoover Commission, which analyzes all state government reorganization plans, said they favored the idea behind the governor's proposal to centralize California's energy policy under a cabinet-level energy czar.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | DAN MORAIN and JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Legislation aimed at cutting prices for more than a fourth of the power consumed in California stalled Tuesday, as Democrats questioned why a few alternative energy generators--some of them campaign donors--stood to receive higher payments than others. Lawmakers working to unravel California's energy mess have been negotiating for weeks in an effort to cut the price paid to more than 600 generators of alternative power by more than half, to below 8 cents a kilowatt-hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2003 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
Californians pay an extra $3 billion a year for electricity since a failed attempt at deregulation, with rates that are 52% to 70% higher than those in Arizona, and power supplies could run short again in 2007 and beyond, according to testimony Tuesday in a legislative hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2012 | By Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - On 7,300 isolated acres in eastern Kern County, a plan for dozens of wind turbines 20 stories high to generate enough electricity for tens of thousands of homes may hinge on who is elected president. Millions of dollars have been spent laying the groundwork. Permits are in order, contractors are lined up, government planners are on board. But like many other green energy efforts in California, the Avalon Wind Project awaits the fate of key federal subsidies. For Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, such aid represents government run amok, allowing bureaucrats to pick winners and losers in renewable energy rather than letting the free market sort them out. Romney has not offered many specifics about what he would cut, but his opposition in general to aid for alternative energy production has been a pillar of his campaign.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1991
Virtually everyone agrees that the United States is involved in the Persian Gulf War at least in part because of oil. But what should our energy policy be when the war is over? How can we reduce our dependence on Middle East oil? How should we deal with the region once hostilities are over? Sharon Bernstein interviewed a range of industry leaders and experts, including oil company executives, the head of the nation's largest investor-owned public utility and consumer advocates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2002 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal regulators Wednesday more than doubled the top price at which energy generators can sell electricity in California and moved to sharply reduce Gov. Gray Davis' authority over the state's power grid. At the same time, however, they voted to create a computer-controlled system designed to block attempts to manipulate power prices.
OPINION
July 26, 2009 | Judith Lewis, Judith Lewis is a Los Angeles journalist who writes about technology and environmental issues. She is a contributing editor to High Country News.
It was a fine June day in 2007 when a senator from Illinois, then a long-shot for the presidency, stood beside the pumps at Conserv Fuel in West Los Angeles and congratulated the heroes of the biofuel revolution. Conserv Fuel was one of the first fueling stations in the country to offer biofuel at the pump, and Barack Obama was looking to establish himself as an alternative-fuel-friendly candidate. He railed against the Bush administration's oil-centric energy policy. He commended Gov.
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