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California Gambling Control Commission

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
An appointee of Gov. Jerry Brown to the California Gambling Control Commission says the state could reap hundreds of millions of dollars annually if betting on sports were legalized. “There is the opportunity to raise money for the state,” Richard J. Schuetz told the Senate Rules Committee on Wednesday. “More importantly, it would remove a criminal element.” Although legislation has been introduced creating a format for legalized sports betting in California, Schuetz noted that Congress would first have to change federal law to legalize that form of gambling in California.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
An appointee of Gov. Jerry Brown to the California Gambling Control Commission says the state could reap hundreds of millions of dollars annually if betting on sports were legalized. “There is the opportunity to raise money for the state,” Richard J. Schuetz told the Senate Rules Committee on Wednesday. “More importantly, it would remove a criminal element.” Although legislation has been introduced creating a format for legalized sports betting in California, Schuetz noted that Congress would first have to change federal law to legalize that form of gambling in California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2003 | Gregg Jones and Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writers
Public policy analysts on Friday condemned a proposal that Gov. Gray Davis made behind closed doors to give Indian tribes the right to choose two members of the commission that regulates tribal gambling in California. "It's beyond the perception of impropriety," said Bill Thompson, a professor of public administration at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and author of "Gambling in America: An Encyclopedia." "It's 'You vote for me, you give me money and support; I give you this.' It's wrong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2004 | Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writer
A long-simmering battle over a casino in Los Angeles County's tiniest city has reached a critical phase as the state Gambling Control Commission weighs whether to grant the card club's controversial owner, Dr. Irving I. Moskowitz, a permanent gaming license. Moskowitz, a reclusive Miami Beach multimillionaire, runs a gaming empire in the one-square-mile city of Hawaiian Gardens. He bankrolls local charities, and his gambling revenues help keep the city solvent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2004 | Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writer
A long-simmering battle over a casino in Los Angeles County's tiniest city has reached a critical phase as the state Gambling Control Commission weighs whether to grant the card club's controversial owner, Dr. Irving I. Moskowitz, a permanent gaming license. Moskowitz, a reclusive Miami Beach multimillionaire, runs a gaming empire in the one-square-mile city of Hawaiian Gardens. He bankrolls local charities, and his gambling revenues help keep the city solvent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gambling regulators have canceled today's much-ballyhooed deadline for Native American casinos to install hundreds of lucrative slot machines--a deadline they say never existed but developed out of confusion over California's new casino gambling compact. The decision by the California Gambling Commission, announced in a letter Monday, was eyed warily by Native American leaders who question whether the agency even has the right to control slot machine licenses.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis on Tuesday appointed four members to the state Gambling Control Commission, a new body with wide-ranging authority over California's multibillion-dollar card club industry and some jurisdiction over Indian casinos. The appointees are John E. Hensley, 57, of Los Angeles; Arlo Smith, 72, of San Francisco; Michael C. Palmer, 51, of Los Angeles; and J.K. Sasaki, 51, of San Francisco. Hensley will chair the commission, which was born out of legislation by state Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2003 | Virginia Ellis and Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writers
With the clock ticking on the Davis administration, the governor's office is offering last-minute concessions to the state's powerful casino tribes by moving to change the balance of the gambling control commission and oust its top legal advisor, according to the commission chairman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009 | Shelby Grad
Indian casinos in California will be allowed to add more than 3,000 new slot machines, a state commission has decided. The state's gaming commission agreed to the new slot machines after a federal court ruled that some Indian casinos were due them under contracts signed with the state. Most of the new slots will go to Northern California tribes, but some new machines will go to casinos in northern San Diego County and the Inland Empire. According to the California Gambling Control Commission, the machines are going to: Big Sandy Band Rancheria of Mono Indians, 1,650; Blue Lake Rancheria, 40; Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, 44; Cachil Dehe Band of Wintun Indians of the Colusa Indian Community, 427; Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians, 100; Mooretown Rancheria of Maidu Indians, 45; Paskenta Band of Nomalki Indians, 27; Picayune Rancheria of Chukchansi Indians, 200; Rincon Band of San Luiseno Mission Indians, 400; San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians, 428; Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians, 187. Some officials hope the new slots will increase revenue to the cash-strapped state.
OPINION
August 14, 1994
Legislation to bring needed oversight to California's booming card club and casino industry is being dealt a losing hand in Sacramento, where some legislators seem to see the political odds as favoring delay rather than action. That's shortsighted. Government errs when it waits too long to regulate in an area where oversight clearly is needed. Legalized gambling is a classic case in point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2003 | Virginia Ellis and Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writers
With the clock ticking on the Davis administration, the governor's office is offering last-minute concessions to the state's powerful casino tribes by moving to change the balance of the gambling control commission and oust its top legal advisor, according to the commission chairman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2003 | Gregg Jones and Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writers
Public policy analysts on Friday condemned a proposal that Gov. Gray Davis made behind closed doors to give Indian tribes the right to choose two members of the commission that regulates tribal gambling in California. "It's beyond the perception of impropriety," said Bill Thompson, a professor of public administration at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and author of "Gambling in America: An Encyclopedia." "It's 'You vote for me, you give me money and support; I give you this.' It's wrong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gambling regulators have canceled today's much-ballyhooed deadline for Native American casinos to install hundreds of lucrative slot machines--a deadline they say never existed but developed out of confusion over California's new casino gambling compact. The decision by the California Gambling Commission, announced in a letter Monday, was eyed warily by Native American leaders who question whether the agency even has the right to control slot machine licenses.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis on Tuesday appointed four members to the state Gambling Control Commission, a new body with wide-ranging authority over California's multibillion-dollar card club industry and some jurisdiction over Indian casinos. The appointees are John E. Hensley, 57, of Los Angeles; Arlo Smith, 72, of San Francisco; Michael C. Palmer, 51, of Los Angeles; and J.K. Sasaki, 51, of San Francisco. Hensley will chair the commission, which was born out of legislation by state Atty. Gen.
OPINION
May 5, 2007
CALIFORNIA GOT A lousy deal after voters in 1998 and 2000 approved measures allowing Indian tribes to open casinos. The compacts negotiated by former Gov. Gray Davis didn't compel the tribes to give a cent of their earnings to the state. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is working to change that, but the state Assembly is standing in the way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2003 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
California's take from the gambling industry is modest compared with that of other states: $180 million a year from horse tracks, card rooms and tribes. Although California is the second-largest gambling state, after Nevada, at least seven others receive more, according to surveys by the National Assn. of State Budget Officers and by The Times. This year's tribal payments are supposed to total $140 million, though payments are $10 million short, and two tribes have sued over the payment process.
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