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California Gnatcatcher

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1993
"How Wilson Got Snookered by Babbitt in the Gnatcatcher Deal," by Hugh Hewitt (Opinion, July 11), is good entertainment but short on facts. His portrayal of the California Natural Community Conservation Plan (NCCP) as unworkable is inaccurate. In partnership with the threatened species listing of the California gnatcatcher, the NCCP provides an unprecedented opportunity for cooperative planning and long-term solutions to environmental and development needs. Delays will be minimized by treating many projects at once.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
A U.S. District Court judge Tuesday ordered three federal agencies to "take all necessary measures" to better protect 40 endangered species in four national forests in Southern California. Judge Marilyn Hall Patel's action followed a 2009 federal court decision that management plans for the Angeles, Cleveland, Los Padres and San Bernardino national forests failed to ensure that human activities not jeopardize already-imperiled plants and animals. Photos: Threatened with extinction Patel gave the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the U.S. Forest Service six months to develop and implement long-term safeguards for the 40 species, which include the California condor and California gnatcatcher.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1993
An emergency is no less an emergency for being dubbed a pickle. If I am entering the terminal stage of a deadly affliction, I will not want to have my official status changed from "critical" to "serious" in deference to some long-range plan based on prevention rather than cure, however worthy that concept may be. The California gnatcatcher--as a distinct species--clings to survival by a hair. To change its official status from "endangered" to "threatened," and deprive it of the protection of the Endangered Species Act, will not only condemn it to extinction, it will also jeopardize the outlook for Babbitt's worthy long-range, regionally based habitat protection program.
NEWS
September 20, 2008
Dana Point Headlands: An article in Thursday's California section about the Dana Point Headlands project said developers completely leveled the original outcropping, home to the endangered Pacific pocket mouse and threatened California gnatcatcher. In fact, 30 acres were set aside as a conservation park for wildlife.
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | DORIS SHIELDS / Los Angeles Times
Description: The slenderly built body is blue-gray above and grayish-brown below. Long, outer tail feathers are black; thin white lines are conspicuous on outer web of the tail. White ring around eye. Males have prominent black cap during breeding season. Length: 4 1/2 inches. Habitat: Coastal sagebrush, dry coastal slopes. Found in Baja and Southern California only. Diet: Earthworms, snails, various insects (including gnats) and berries. Displays: Unknown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top administrators at the state Department of Fish and Game said Tuesday that they have not decided what advice to give the state commission that convenes Friday to determine the future of the California gnatcatcher. Howard Sarasohn, the department's deputy director, said the recommendation will be made right before the California Fish and Game Commission meets to vote on whether to declare the songbird a candidate for the state endangered species list.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Margarita Co. began clearing a parcel of land in South County on Wednesday after a Superior Court judge refused to issue a court order sought by environmentalists who want to protect the sensitive scrublands they say are home to the California gnatcatcher. The local chapter of the National Audubon Society had asked Judge Phillip E. Cox to keep the company from clearing the land until after resolution of a lawsuit challenging the development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1990 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a free-lance writer who lives in Santa Ana.
Being endangered these days is a pretty good gig. If you happen to be, say, a snail darter, it's almost like being protected by the Secret Service. No worries about ending up in a fishnet, or on the wrong end of someone's 12-gauge, or having your natural habitat turned into a yogurt bar. Once people find out that you're a bit on the rare side, you get coddled like a pasha. Ask any giant panda. So the California gnatcatcher has to be feeling pretty smug these days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2006 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
The researchers waded through the Palos Verdes Peninsula's tilted thickets of sage last summer hoping to find at least 56 pairs of California gnatcatchers, the same number counted a dozen years ago. But to their surprise -- and delight -- the final count hit 72 pairs, about 29% more than were discovered in 1994. "We were incredibly excited at the numbers," said Andrea Vona, a habitat restoration expert with the Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials are seeking a two-week extension on a court-ordered designation of 800,000 acres of critical habitat for the tiny California gnatcatcher. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had been ordered to designate the land by today but told a U.S. District Court judge on Friday that it needed at least two more weeks to review information collected in public hearings and to prepare maps and legal descriptions of the land. The request, filed in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed with a new study, developers are demanding that federal officials postpone a decision due later this week on providing nearly 800,000 acres of "critical habitat" for the tiny gnatcatcher in Southern California. The study, co-written by Jonathon L. Atwood, a biologist whose earlier research concluded that the birds were nearing extinction, is being used by developers as proof that the California gnatcatcher is genetically so close to a Mexican songbird that the species is not in danger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed with a new study, developers are demanding federal officials postpone a decision due later this week on providing nearly 800,000 acres of critical habitat for the tiny gnatcatcher in Southern California--including more than 97,000 acres in Orange County.
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Irvine Co. celebrates the recent approval of its controversial Crystal Cove housing development, its efforts to build 1,886 homes inland at the base of the Santa Ana Mountains are encountering robust opposition, with heavy criticism of the project's environmental impact report. Critics of the development at the eastern edge of Orange contend the environmental impact statement is "grossly inaccurate," with outdated and erroneous information that underestimates and ignores potential problems with polluted runoff, endangered species, traffic and other issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
The once-common coastal California gnatcatcher could get some protection from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if more than 124,000 acres of land are designated as critical habitat for the threatened songbird. The protected areas would include 120,000 acres of federal land and about 4,600 acres of nonfederal land in Orange, San Diego, Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Ventura counties, Fish and Wildlife officials said Monday.
NEWS
September 3, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move with broad implications for future growth, federal wildlife officials have begun denying permits to some southern Orange County landowners who are seeking to clear plots of land containing rare California gnatcatchers. A few landowners recently learned that they cannot immediately grade single-family lots because of uncertainty, given the current building boom, over how many of the federally protected birds still reside in the region.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The survival of the California gnatcatcher in Southern California is not likely to be threatened by the current federal policy that allows developers to destroy a portion of the birds' habitat while wide-scale preservation policies are being adopted, according to a federal study released Friday. U.S.
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