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NEWS
April 27, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would not have been an easy reelection bid in any case for freshman Rep. Ken Calvert (R-Riverside), who barely made it to Congress two years ago. But now Calvert's biggest reelection hurdle may be his own indiscretions, which also could pose a problem in surviving even his own party's June primary. The reason: After months of denying it, Calvert, 40, has admitted having sex in his car one night last November with a woman who police say is a known prostitute.
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NEWS
August 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Pete Wilson has named as his director of forestry a Northern California lumberman with strong environmental credentials who is expected to move the agency toward more strict regulation of logging practices. Richard Wilson, 57, a Mendocino County timberland owner and rancher who is no relation to the governor, was selected to replace Hal Walt as head of the embattled Forestry Department, an agency often criticized by environmentalists for being too closely tied to the timber industry.
NEWS
June 26, 2000 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High-flying ex-state Sen. Alan Robbins, driven from the Legislature in 1991 as an admitted felon, has quietly resurfaced here in a fight to save his legacy. Robbins is waging a low-profile campaign to kill an extraordinary bill that would remove his name from the official title of every state law memorializing him as its author. His name would be banished, for example, from the landmark "Robbins Rape Evidence Law" of 1974, and from the obscure "Robbins Courthouse Construction Fund" act of 1984.
NEWS
September 13, 1994 | MARK GLADSTONE and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Still proclaiming his innocence, former state Sen. Frank Hill (R-Whittier) on Monday was sentenced to 46 months in federal prison for taking an illegal $2,500 payment from an undercover FBI agent participating in a Capitol sting operation. U.S. District Judge Edward J. Garcia ordered Hill, who resigned his Senate seat in July after his conviction on public corruption charges, to report to federal prison authorities by Oct. 12.
NEWS
February 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
A jury found Brian Setencich, former speaker of the California Assembly, innocent of bribery and mail fraud charges Monday but deadlocked on two counts of filing false tax returns. "It's like a big weight off my shoulders. I've been held up by this for too long," said a jovial Setencich after the jury was escorted out of the courtroom. Setencich was indicted in 1998 on charges of bribery, mail fraud and filing false tax returns for 1996 and 1997.
NEWS
July 27, 1988 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writer
The Fair Political Practices Commission, in its first act to implement Proposition 73, adopted emergency regulations Tuesday prohibiting elected officials throughout the state from spending public funds to send newsletters and most other "mass mailings" that include their names or photographs.
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
Every time I try to tell somebody from someplace else that California isn't as goofy a state as everybody thinks, something happens to screw up my whole case. Take the news story that ran coast to coast last week with a Sacramento dateline. "Gov. Pete Wilson," it began, "rode to the rescue of Caesar salad lovers, signing legislation allowing restaurants to serve the salads with raw eggs in the dressing, if the diner doesn't object." Stop the presses.
NEWS
December 12, 1992 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After missing two court appearances while mountain climbing in Costa Rica, former state Sen. Paul Carpenter told a federal court judge Friday that he cannot afford a lawyer for his retrial on political corruption charges. However, U.S. District Judge Edward J. Garcia expressed doubt about claims of poverty from the former politician and ordered a hearing to review Carpenter's financial status.
NEWS
February 15, 1993 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren, the defining event of his first two years in office was the execution of double-murderer Robert Alton Harris. Lungren does not gloat over Harris' dawn gassing at San Quentin in April, but he and his aides return again and again to the image of the state's top lawyer standing by at the prison through the night, fending off a series of last-minute appeals to see that California's first execution in a quarter-century was carried out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2002 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four top officials in the California Department of Water Resources, including Director Tom Hannigan, face fines totaling $100,000 for allegedly failing to have energy consultants submit personal conflict-of-interest statements in a timely manner, state officials said Friday.
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