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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2012 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Brian Banks logged onto Facebook last year, and a new friend request startled him. It was the woman who, nearly a decade ago, accused him of rape when they were both students at Long Beach Poly High School. Banks had served five years in prison for the alleged rape, and now he was unemployed and weary. So he replied to Wanetta Gibson with a question: Would she meet with him and a private investigator? She agreed. At the meeting, which was secretly recorded, Gibson said she had lied.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Anh Do
A San Gabriel Valley couple who moved to Qatar to help the tiny country ready itself for hosting the 2020 World Cup games were sentenced Thursday to three years in prison for the death of their adopted daughter, a verdict that stunned those who have followed the case. Matthew and Grace Huang have been detained in the country's capital, Doha, for nearly a year on charges they murdered the girl - one of three children they adopted from Africa. The couple contend Gloria, 8, died from an eating disorder.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2013 | By Joseph Serna, Los Angeles Times, This post has been corrected. See the note below.
It took more than 13 years and appeals at nearly every level of the state and federal court system, but with the simple turn of a key by a state correctional officer on Tuesday afternoon, Daniel Larsen was unshackled and free. "I feel good, feel blessed," Larsen said with an ear-to-ear grin as he rode the elevator down to the main floor of the U.S. Central District Court in downtown Los Angeles, surrounded by friends and family. Magistrate Judge Suzanne Segal ordered Larsen's release, finding that he was "actually innocent" of carrying a concealed knife during a 1998 bar fight in Northridge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2013 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
The Long Beach Unified School District has won a $2.6-million judgment in its lawsuit against a former student who falsely accused classmate and football player Brian Banks of rape, officials said. "The court recognizes that our school district was a victim in this case," district Supt. Christopher J. Steinhauser said in a statement last week. "This judgment demonstrates that when people attempt to defraud our school system, they will feel the full force of the law. " The Los Angeles County Superior Court judgment handed down Monday includes the $750,000 settlement that the district had originally paid to Wanetta Gibson, as well as interest, attorney fees and $1 million in punitive damages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2010 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
The California Innocence Project argued that Reggie Cole's conviction in a 1994 slaying stemmed from fabricated evidence. On Sunday, he celebrated his release with relatives in Los Angeles. The California Innocence Project argued that Reggie Cole's conviction in a 1994 slaying stemmed from fabricated evidence. On Sunday, he celebrated his release with relatives in Los Angeles. Sixteen years after the gunshot slaying he insists he didn't commit, and 10 years after the fatal prison stabbing he says he was forced to commit, Reggie Cole stepped out of prison this weekend a free man. Cole, 35, was released Saturday from Calipatria State Prison in Imperial County, into the arms of family and lawyers who fought for his release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
An L.A. County Superior Court judge on Tuesday rejected a bid to free a man convicted in a 1995 dismemberment murder, questioning the credibility of a key witness who recanted her original testimony in the case. Edward Contreras, now 40, was found guilty along with Scott Taylor of beating, beheading and cutting up a friend, Frederick Walker, with a chain saw and a machete at a backyard barbecue in Santa Clarita and stealing $635 from the victim. Contreras was accused of helping to clean up blood and body parts from the scene and driving his car to a remote area of Bouquet Canyon to dispose of the remains.
SPORTS
May 24, 2012 | By Mike Hiserman
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge has reversed the 2002 rape and kidnapping conviction of former Long Beach Poly football standout Brian Banks. Banks, now 26, was wrongly convicted of the charges based on the testimony of Wanetta Gibson, an acquaintance. Gibson testified that Banks raped her on the Poly campus. Banks said the encounter was consensual. Rather than face a prison term of from 41 years to life, Banks accepted a plea deal that destroyed his dream of playing college football.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2007 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
At her 1994 murder trial, her own children testified that she had grabbed their 4-year-old cousin Lynette Orozco by the hair and shoved her under the water in a plastic wading pool until she drowned. More than a decade later, Dolores Macias' children signed sworn statements saying that their paternal grandmother had brainwashed them into lying about their mother. On Monday, however, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Stephen A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2009 | Hector Becerra
Fourteen years ago, Reggie Cole was sentenced to life without parole for a murder during a botched robbery in South Los Angeles. This week, as Cole's sister, niece and 76-year-old stepfather looked on in a Compton courtroom, prosecutors dismissed the murder charge against him. But Cole didn't walk out a free man. He remains incarcerated for killing an inmate nine years ago while he was at Calipatria State Prison in Imperial County.
SPORTS
May 30, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
The Seattle Seahawks have confirmed they will hold a tryout for Brian Banks, the former Long Beach Poly football star who was freed after serving five years in prison for a rape case in which he was falsely accused. Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll did not speak to reporters after the Seahawks' off-season workout on Wednesday, but the team confirmed that Banks will work out for the team on June 7. Banks, now 26, pleaded no contest 10 years ago on the advice of his lawyer after a childhood friend falsely accused him of attacking her on their high school campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
Brian Banks was inside a New York television studio, waiting to tape an episode of "The View," when he got a long-awaited call from a friend. For weeks, Banks had known that signing a contract to play with the NFL's Atlanta Falcons was a possibility. But he had tried out with several NFL teams the season before and did not come away with a contract. “You're holding your breath,” Banks' attorney Justin Brooks said.     Brooks was with Banks and his mother Tuesday when the exonerated former high school football standout heard the magic words: The Falcons wanted Banks in Atlanta the next day for a physical exam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
Brian Banks called signing a contract with the Atlanta Falcons on Wednesday the greatest accomplishment of his life, aside from clearing his name. Officials of his new team said they were happy to have him on board. "We are pleased to have Brian join our team," Falcons General Manager Thomas Dimitroff said in a statement. "We had a chance to work him out last year and have been monitoring his progress since then. "He has worked extremely hard for this chance over the last year and he has shown us that he is prepared for this opportunity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2013 | By Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
Almost a year ago, a former standout football player at Long Beach Polytechnic High School trembled in Los Angeles County Superior Court as a judge dismissed his rape conviction. Outside the courtroom that day, Brian Banks offered cautious hope that one day, he could restart his athletic career. Wednesday, Banks signed a contract with the NFL's Atlanta Falcons, a major step in his quest for redemption. "I can't believe this is happening," Banks told reporters shortly after signing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2013 | By Joseph Serna, Los Angeles Times, This post has been corrected. See the note below.
It took more than 13 years and appeals at nearly every level of the state and federal court system, but with the simple turn of a key by a state correctional officer on Tuesday afternoon, Daniel Larsen was unshackled and free. "I feel good, feel blessed," Larsen said with an ear-to-ear grin as he rode the elevator down to the main floor of the U.S. Central District Court in downtown Los Angeles, surrounded by friends and family. Magistrate Judge Suzanne Segal ordered Larsen's release, finding that he was "actually innocent" of carrying a concealed knife during a 1998 bar fight in Northridge.
SPORTS
May 30, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
The Seattle Seahawks have confirmed they will hold a tryout for Brian Banks, the former Long Beach Poly football star who was freed after serving five years in prison for a rape case in which he was falsely accused. Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll did not speak to reporters after the Seahawks' off-season workout on Wednesday, but the team confirmed that Banks will work out for the team on June 7. Banks, now 26, pleaded no contest 10 years ago on the advice of his lawyer after a childhood friend falsely accused him of attacking her on their high school campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2012 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Brian Banks logged onto Facebook last year, and a new friend request startled him. It was the woman who, nearly a decade ago, accused him of rape when they were both students at Long Beach Poly High School. Banks had served five years in prison for the alleged rape, and now he was unemployed and weary. So he replied to Wanetta Gibson with a question: Would she meet with him and a private investigator? She agreed. At the meeting, which was secretly recorded, Gibson said she had lied.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Mike Hiserman
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge has reversed the 2002 rape and kidnapping conviction of former Long Beach Poly football standout Brian Banks. Banks, now 26, was wrongly convicted of the charges based on the testimony of Wanetta Gibson, an acquaintance. Gibson testified that Banks raped her on the Poly campus. Banks said the encounter was consensual. Rather than face a prison term of from 41 years to life, Banks accepted a plea deal that destroyed his dream of playing college football.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
Brian Banks was inside a New York television studio, waiting to tape an episode of "The View," when he got a long-awaited call from a friend. For weeks, Banks had known that signing a contract to play with the NFL's Atlanta Falcons was a possibility. But he had tried out with several NFL teams the season before and did not come away with a contract. “You're holding your breath,” Banks' attorney Justin Brooks said.     Brooks was with Banks and his mother Tuesday when the exonerated former high school football standout heard the magic words: The Falcons wanted Banks in Atlanta the next day for a physical exam.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Mike Hiserman
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge has reversed the 2002 rape and kidnapping conviction of former Long Beach Poly football standout Brian Banks. Banks, now 26, was wrongly convicted of the charges based on the testimony of Wanetta Gibson, an acquaintance. Gibson testified that Banks raped her on the Poly campus. Banks said the encounter was consensual. Rather than face a prison term of from 41 years to life, Banks accepted a plea deal that destroyed his dream of playing college football.
SPORTS
May 24, 2012 | By Mike Hiserman
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge has reversed the 2002 rape and kidnapping conviction of former Long Beach Poly football standout Brian Banks. Banks, now 26, was wrongly convicted of the charges based on the testimony of Wanetta Gibson, an acquaintance. Gibson testified that Banks raped her on the Poly campus. Banks said the encounter was consensual. Rather than face a prison term of from 41 years to life, Banks accepted a plea deal that destroyed his dream of playing college football.
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