Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCalifornia Institute For Regenerative Medicine
IN THE NEWS

California Institute For Regenerative Medicine

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2007 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
California's voter-approved stem cell research institute cleared a roadblock Monday when a University of Wisconsin alumni group said it would not seek to collect licensing fees on discoveries made with institute grants. Proposition 71, passed in 2004, created the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and all but promised taxpayers royalties in return for approving $3 billion in bonds for research. A move to collect fees out of any royalties would likely have led to a court battle.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 29, 2013 | Patt Morrison
In 2004, with President George W. Bush dead set against stem cell research, California just went ahead and did it. Voters made stem cell research a state constitutional right, and endorsed $3 billion in bond sales for 10 years to cement the deal. CIRM, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine created under Proposition 71, has become a world center for stem cell research, and its president is Australian Alan Trounson, a pioneer in in vitro fertilization. As Proposition 71 approaches its 10-year anniversary, Trounson offers a prognosis.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2007 | From a Times Staff Writer
A state appeals court upheld the constitutionality of California's voter-created stem cell institute Monday, decisively affirming a lower court decision less than two weeks after hearing oral arguments in the case.
OPINION
December 14, 2012
The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the quasi-governmental agency authorized to spend $3 billion in taxpayer money on embryonic stem cell research, deserves praise for commissioning an independent study of its operations by a blue-ribbon committee of the Institute of Medicine, the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences. But the $700,000 spent on the study - funded by donations - will be wasted if the institute's oversight board fails to heed the committee's criticisms, which echo the findings of the Little Hoover Commission and other groups over the years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
California's voter-created stem cell institute is expected to award $227 million in grants today to seed a laboratory building spree at a dozen universities and research centers, including USC, UCLA and UC Irvine. New labs are needed to house the growing number of researchers funded by 2004's Proposition 71, officials at the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine say, even though one of the main pressures on lab space is likely to be lifted after the November election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2005 | From Associated Press
California officials conceded Monday that a legal challenge has severely hampered the state stem cell agency's ability to borrow even a penny of the $3 billion in research funds it had hoped to raise over the next 10 years. Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer and Treasurer Phil Angelides said their offices are aggressively fighting the lawsuits while pursuing alternative ways for the stem cell agency to borrow money to fund medical research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2006 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
Stem cell research in California received a $181-million boost Monday when the committee that oversees public financing for the controversial science approved a loan from the state and agreed to raise additional money from philanthropic organizations. Two years ago, California voters resoundingly approved Proposition 71 to authorize $3 billion in bonds to fund stem cell research, making the state a national leader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2006 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
A Santa Monica-based taxpayer rights group launched a formal challenge Tuesday to three patents that it contends have had a chilling effect on embryonic stem cell research. The move came on the day the U.S. Senate approved a bill that would expand federal funding for such research, sending it to President Bush, who has promised a veto.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2005 | Megan Garvey, Times Staff Writer
When California voters passed a $3-billion stem cell bond measure last year -- after a multimillion-dollar campaign that promised "Cures for California" -- backers promised to move fast to get money to researchers. To do so, they said they would bypass traditional -- often slow -- government accountability procedures. So far, the effort to push fast has generated more controversy than speed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2005 | Megan Garvey, Times Staff Writer
In the market for about 17,000 square feet of prime commercial real estate? How does a decade rent-free overlooking the 18th hole at Torrey Pines sound? Ocean view included. Perhaps a location steps from San Francisco Bay, across from the Giants baseball park, more suits your fancy. Also gratis, of course. Or consider the offer from Los Angeles of a private jet, or San Jose's dangling of a 24-hour concierge, "lush fountains" and an on-site exercise facility for your workers.
SCIENCE
December 7, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
The board of California's stem cell funding agency is rife with conflicts of interest and should be restructured to improve the integrity of its grant-making process, according to a new report from independent experts convened by the national Institute of Medicine. The committee found that "far too many" of the board members are from organizations that stand to benefit from the $3 billion the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine is supposed to dole out to researchers over 10 years.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
For years, Geron Corp. had claimed to be in the vanguard among California companies engaged in stem cell research. So it was something of a stunner when it announced Nov. 14 that it was abandoning the stem cell field completely. Geron's shares fell 20% the next day, but that was probably nothing compared with how far spirits must have fallen at the California stem cell agency, which just a few months earlier had made its highest-profile investment ever by awarding Menlo Park-based Geron a $25-million loan to help fund the first human trial of stem cell-based spinal cord therapy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
California's stem cell research agency says it needs billions more taxpayer dollars to deliver on promised cures to major diseases. Yet at a time when other departments are cutting back spending, the agency recently agreed to pay its new boss one of the highest salaries in state government. The 50-person grant-making body will pay a Los Angeles investment banker $400,000 to serve as its new part-time board chairman, pushing the combined salaries of its two top officials to nearly $1 million per year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2010 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
When millionaire Silicon Valley real estate developer Bob Klein launched his ballot drive to create a $3-billion state fund for stem-cell research in 2004, he pitched it as a way of taking politics out of science and focusing on cures. One particularly heartbreaking campaign ad showed former big screen Superman Christopher Reeve paralyzed in a wheelchair, struggling for breath and imploring California voters to "stand up for those who can't. " Next month, Klein's six-year term as chairman of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine expires.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
It's never pretty to see people get blown up by their own bombs. But it sure can be educational. A case in point is the leadership of the California stem cell program, which pushed through Proposition 71 in 2004 to create the program, entrenched itself in almost unassailable control of its $3 billion in funding, and has self-righteously fought every attempt to improve public oversight over its disbursement of what is, after all, the people's money....
SCIENCE
January 9, 2010
A team from City of Hope in Duarte plans to genetically modify the blood-forming stem cells of AIDS patients so that they can rebuild their immune systems with new T cells that aren't susceptible to HIV. Researchers from USC and UC Santa Barbara are growing human embryonic stem cells into retinal pigment epithelium cells that can replace damaged eye cells in patients with age-related macular degeneration. Stanford University scientists would like to treat patients with a genetic skin disease called epidermolysis bullosa by reprogramming their skin cells and fixing the defect.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2005 | Michael Hiltzik, Golden State appears every Monday and Thursday. You can reach Michael Hiltzik at golden.state@latimes.com and read his previous columns at latimes.com/hiltzik.
There probably wasn't much reason to hope that California's new embryonic stem cell institute, the offspring of perhaps the most misleading initiative campaign of 2004, would be a model of circumspection and openness as it geared up to spend $6 billion of taxpayers' money. But did it have to live down to our expectations so quickly?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2005 | Alex Raksin, Times Staff Writer
California's stem cell research agency awarded the first of a planned $3 billion in grants Friday, announcing that a little less than $39 million would go to UCLA, UC Irvine, Stanford and several other campuses to help set up programs to train scientists. Although the amount was relatively small, competition among 26 universities and nonprofit institutions was stiff because those selected hope to be at the front of the line for more lucrative public financing to come.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2009 | MICHAEL HILTZIK
In the annals of wrongheaded things done with the best intentions, the California stem cell program has always been in a category of its own. The $6-billion program was enacted by voters in 2004 as Proposition 71 after a campaign of exceptional intellectual dishonesty, featuring vignettes of sufferers from diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other heartbreaking diseases for which it seemed to promise imminent cures through research into embryonic stem cells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2009 | Eric Bailey
On the cusp of a new era in stem cell science, Democratic heavyweights are pushing to install the outgoing California Democratic Party chief in a leadership post at the state's $3-billion research program. Art Torres, who served two decades as a state lawmaker before assuming the party chairmanship a dozen years ago, is being backed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, U.S. Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer of California and Sen. Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts, among others.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|