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BUSINESS
July 30, 1991 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Too often, adding another layer of managers to a company payroll means trouble for workers--another bunch of self-important supervisors that workers must cope with. It doesn't have to be that way, though, and it can even help now and then.
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BUSINESS
December 9, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's unions, bucking the continuing declines in membership nationally for organized labor, have started to attract more workers. New figures developed by a Florida State University economist, David A. Macpherson, show that union membership in California rose to 2.08 million during the first 10 months of 1997. That was up 21,000 from the 1996 level. Experts say California's increase comes mainly from the large pool of low-wage immigrant workers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1989 | ALLISON SAMUELS
About 15 state employees picketed outside the Fairview Developmental Center on Wednesday to protest what they consider inadequate staffing levels at the state's seven facilities that house developmentally disabled patients. Sponsored by the California Assn. of Psychiatric Technicians, which represents more than 750 employees at the Fairview center, the protest was the third in a series of demonstrations aimed at increasing public awareness of what the group calls a "serious health problem."
BUSINESS
July 30, 1991 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Too often, adding another layer of managers to a company payroll means trouble for workers--another bunch of self-important supervisors that workers must cope with. It doesn't have to be that way, though, and it can even help now and then.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1987 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
President Reagan somehow took great comfort from last Friday's government report that showed the nation's jobless rate remained steady in May--at a hefty 6.3%. A White House spokesman with Reagan in Venice called the latest jobless rate "good unemployment news on the eve of the economic summit."
BUSINESS
December 9, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's unions, bucking the continuing declines in membership nationally for organized labor, have started to attract more workers. New figures developed by a Florida State University economist, David A. Macpherson, show that union membership in California rose to 2.08 million during the first 10 months of 1997. That was up 21,000 from the 1996 level. Experts say California's increase comes mainly from the large pool of low-wage immigrant workers.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1999
* The California Agricultural Labor Relations Board set a date of Dec. 7 to hear objections filed in an election to represent pickers at the nation's largest strawberry grower. Workers at Coastal Berry Co. in Oxnard and Watsonville cast ballots in June in the contest pitting the United Farm Workers union against Coastal Berry Farm Workers Committee. The committee won the battle at the ballot box, but the UFW filed 234 objections; the board has dismissed 135 of those. * Ford Motor Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001 | FRED ALVAREZ
Ventura County farm workers can learn about their rights under state labor law and changes occurring within the farm industry at a forum Wednesday. The event is being sponsored by the Oxnard office of California Rural Legal Assistance and the California Agricultural Labor Relations Board. Changes in state employment and labor laws, and new regulations designed to protect laborers from pesticide exposure will be discussed. The forum will take place from 6 to 8 p.m.
NEWS
November 26, 1993
Ruth M. Friedman, 48, administrative law judge for the California Personnel Board and former law professor. Educated at UC Berkeley and the University of Chicago Law School, she had heard state employee discipline and termination cases for the last decade. She sat as an administrative law judge from 1980 to 1982 for the California Agricultural Labor Relations Board, hearing labor disputes.
OPINION
September 25, 2012 | By Matt Garcia
Cesar Chavez died in 1993, but the Mexican American labor leader's prominence continues to grow. Streets in many American cities bear his name; his face appeared on a postage stamp; President Obama embraced Chavez's slogan, " Sí, se puede " ("Yes, it can be done") in his 2008 campaign; and Apple featured the United Farm Workers founder in its "think different" campaign. These honors have all served to heighten public awareness of Chavez, who for a time seemed to be winning the battle to bring justice to the farm fields of California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1989 | ALLISON SAMUELS
About 15 state employees picketed outside the Fairview Developmental Center on Wednesday to protest what they consider inadequate staffing levels at the state's seven facilities that house developmentally disabled patients. Sponsored by the California Assn. of Psychiatric Technicians, which represents more than 750 employees at the Fairview center, the protest was the third in a series of demonstrations aimed at increasing public awareness of what the group calls a "serious health problem."
BUSINESS
June 10, 1987 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
President Reagan somehow took great comfort from last Friday's government report that showed the nation's jobless rate remained steady in May--at a hefty 6.3%. A White House spokesman with Reagan in Venice called the latest jobless rate "good unemployment news on the eve of the economic summit."
NEWS
November 1, 1985
The California Agricultural Labor Relations Board said a 1984 U.S. Supreme Court ruling does not limit the panel's authority to force growers to rehire and give back pay to illegal aliens. The board, in a 3-2 decision, ruled that its "remedial order of reinstatement and back pay poses no actual conflict with a (federal) Immigration and Naturalization Act law or regulation."
BUSINESS
May 30, 1997 | (Stuart Silverstein)
American Stores Co., parent of the Lucky supermarket chain, plans to issue a statement today supporting the right of the state's strawberry workers to organize into a union without fear of retaliatory discrimination. The statement, while calling for no specific action by Salt Lake City-based American Stores, provides a psychological boost to the United Farm Workers union in its efforts to organize 20,000 strawberry pickers in California. In December, Southern California's Ralphs Grocery Co.
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