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California Medical Board

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1999
The Medical Board of California licenses physicians and other medical professionals. It also investigates medical complaints and issues disciplinary actions. The most serious penalties include license revocation, suspension and probation. These are the Los Angeles County physicians and surgeons subject to serious disciplinary actions between Aug. 1 and Oct. 31, 1998, according to medical board documents. Generally, final actions are published only after all appeals are exhausted. Dr.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
After a long and shameful history, California finally banned the forced sterilization of prison inmates and mental patients in the 1970s; two decades later, the state put safeguards in place to make sure the practice didn't resume. But a new report by the Center for Investigative Reporting suggests that despite those laws, at least 148 female inmates underwent tubal ligations between 2006 and 2010 without the required approval by state medical officials. Many of the women who were sterilized while housed at the California Institution for Women in Corona and Valley State Prison for Women in Chowchilla said they were coerced into agreeing to the procedure, according to the report.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1993
This responds to your July 15 editorial, "Medicine for Problem Doctors." According to the editorial, the report suspending the doctor's privileges was sent to the Medical Board, "sat on a clerk's desk for a month," and was not entered into a computer. It goes on to say that "had it been handled properly, the report would have triggered an investigation that might have pressured the doctor into a substance abuse program for physicians . . . " and "quicker action might have taken the doctor off the road sooner and gotten him the help he needed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2013 | By Lisa Girion and Scott Glover, Los Angeles Times
The Medical Board of California on Friday embraced a host of reforms aimed at combating prescription drug abuse and reducing overdose deaths but balked at a proposal to strip it of its authority to investigate physician misconduct. The board, meeting in Los Angeles, voted to support proposed legislation that would upgrade the state's prescription drug monitoring system, require coroners to report prescription drug overdose deaths to the board, and give the panel new power to halt a doctor's prescribing in some cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
The medical ethics controversy that erupted when Nadya Suleman gave birth to octuplets two years ago took a decisive turn Wednesday when the California medical board announced it will revoke the license of the Beverly Hills fertility doctor who helped the single mother of six conceive eight more children. The "Octomom" case focused national attention on what critics have called "the Wild West" of fertility medicine. And Dr. Michael Kamrava, who assisted Suleman by implanting her with 12 embryos, became a symbol to some of the problems in the burgeoning industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2010 | By Lisa Girion
The California Medical Board put a doctor with a flawed disciplinary history in charge of monitoring another troubled doctor who, while under supervision, allegedly mishandled an abortion leading to a patient's death. On Tuesday, the board acknowledged it had made a mistake. The regulators violated their own rules by naming Dr. Christopher Dotson Jr., a West Los Angeles-based obstetrician-gynecologist who had recently emerged from administrative probation, to supervise the probation of Andrew Rutland, an Orange County obstetrician.
OPINION
May 16, 1993
Any patient deserves to be protected from a bad doctor. Now, after years of criticism that it had fallen down in its responsibility to do that, the California Medical Board has made a major correction. In an important vote for consumer protection, the board moved to allow the public access to crucial background information about physicians. As a result, California now has one of the most open physician disclosure policies in the nation.
NEWS
November 8, 1993 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arguing for doctors' privacy rights, the state's most powerful organization of physicians is trying to stop a month-old California Medical Board policy that allows patients access to a broad array of information about doctors. The California Medical Assn. went to court last week seeking a permanent injunction against the new policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1995 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state judge has cleared a Woodland Hills doctor of charges that he sexually abused a patient during a gynecological exam. The state Medical Board last August accused Dr. H. Brian Herdeg, 65, of having intercourse with the woman and fondling her breasts after she came to his office for a Pap smear in 1992. But after a four-day trial in February, Administrative Law Judge Ralph B. Dash concluded that the woman's "entire story was fabricated."
NEWS
August 26, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Medical Board of California revoked the license of a Lynwood obstetrician on Tuesday, calling him grossly negligent in his care of seven liposuction patients--including one who bled to death after he abandoned her bedside. Dr. Patrick Chavis' license should be pulled "to protect the public," according to a 28-page decision accusing the physician of violations ranging from botching procedures to allowing his nurse to practice medicine.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Today, 19 months after her death, we may finally have a good idea of what killed Paula Rojeski. According to a lawsuit and public autopsy records, the causes included her doing business with the 1-800-GET-THIN folks and the slicing of her aorta during weight-loss surgery at one of their affiliated surgical centers. There was also regulatory indifference on a truly majestic scale. Rojeski, 55, died Sept. 8, 2011, shortly after surgery to implant a Lap-Band at Valley Surgical Center in West Hills, which her family's lawyer says is affiliated with 1-800-GET-THIN and the two brothers behind it, Julian and Michael Omidi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
The University of California has agreed to pay $1.2 million to settle a federal whistle-blower lawsuit charging falsification of records and poor supervision of patients by UC Irvine anesthesiologists. The suit said anesthesiologists at the university's medical center filled out patient care reports before procedures started, "making it appear the anesthesiologist was present" when he or she wasn't. The lawsuit was brought by Dr. Dennis O'Connor, a former professor of anesthesiology at UCI School of Medicine, who will receive $120,000 of the settlement.
OPINION
August 17, 2012
Re "Probation in Lap-Band patient death," Business, Aug. 14 I am opposed to applying an automatic three-strikes punishment for all transgressions. But anesthesiologist Daniel Shin deserves one. In 2007, he was convicted of assaulting someone with a meat cleaver. In 2009, a woman he was treating died, and Shin was disciplined by the California Medical Board but continued to practice. And most recently, a Lap-Band patient under his care in 2010 died; the medical board accused him of "gross negligence.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
An anesthesiologist faulted for his treatment of a patient who died after Lap-Band surgery at a clinic affiliated with the 1-800-GET-THIN ad campaign has been placed on five years' probation by the Medical Board of California. The agency had accused Dr. Daniel Shin of "gross negligence" in his treatment of Tamara Walter, a supermarket employee from Lawndale who died Dec. 26, 2010, three days after having the Lap-Band weight-loss device implanted at a clinic in Beverly Hills. According to the medical board, Shin failed to adequately respond to Walter's worsening condition after surgery and left her with a nurse for more than an hour, despite signs that she was struggling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2012 | By Hailey Branson-Potts, Los Angeles Times
Drug Enforcement Administration agents on Wednesday raided the offices of a Los Angeles County doctor suspected of improperly prescribing powerful narcotics to patients - including undercover agents - with no legitimate need for the drugs. Dr. Andrew S.O. Sun, 76, of La Mirada, surrendered his license to prescribe controlled substances after agents with the DEA, California Medical Board, Internal Revenue Service and the state Department of Healthcare Services searched his home and clinics in East Los Angeles and San Gabriel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2012 | By Hailey Branson-Potts, Los Angeles Times
A Northridge doctor's license was suspended Thursday after medical authorities found that he had been injecting his daughter at home with propofol, the same drug that killed pop star Michael Jackson. Robert S. Markman, a retired anesthesiologist, constructed a treatment area in his adult daughter's "filthy" house, in a bedroom she rarely left, the Medical Board of California alleged in a ruling on an interim suspension order made public Thursday. Markman, according to the board's order, injected his daughter, referred to only as L.M., with the surgical anesthetic about 500 times over five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
The University of California has agreed to pay $1.2 million to settle a federal whistle-blower lawsuit charging falsification of records and poor supervision of patients by UC Irvine anesthesiologists. The suit said anesthesiologists at the university's medical center filled out patient care reports before procedures started, "making it appear the anesthesiologist was present" when he or she wasn't. The lawsuit was brought by Dr. Dennis O'Connor, a former professor of anesthesiology at UCI School of Medicine, who will receive $120,000 of the settlement.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
The Medical Board of California has faulted a doctor in the 2010 death of a Lap-Band patient who had surgery at a clinic affiliated with the 1-800-GET-THIN ad campaign, filing charges that could cause him to lose his license to practice. The board has accused Dr. Daniel Shin, an anesthesiologist, of "gross negligence" in his care of patient Tamara Walter, who died Dec. 26, 2010, at age 52, three days after she had a Lap-Band implanted at a clinic in Beverly Hills. The medical board said Shin failed to adequately respond to Walter's worsening condition after surgery and left her with a nurse for more than an hour, despite signs that she was struggling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
California's medical board failed to discipline 710 troubled doctors even as they were disciplined by hospitals, surgical centers and other healthcare organizations in the state, according to a report released Tuesday. The report by Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit Public Citizen was based on an analysis of doctors' records in the National Practitioner Data Bank from 1990 to 2009. The Department of Health & Human Services uses the data bank to track doctors' discipline, medical malpractice payments and other actions.
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