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California Museum Of Science And Industry

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1988 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
Don M. Muchmore, the once controversial executive director of the California Museum of Science and Industry, is resigning his post immediately, but will continue as executive vice president of the supporting California Museum Foundation, he said Monday. The 65-year-old Muchmore said the move is part of a planned phase-out "over the next 12 to 18 months" when he expects to leave his paid position with the nonprofit foundation and become a private museum consultant.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1988 | STEVE HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Jor-el, the garrulous robot host at the California Museum of Science and Industry, caught the suspicious eye of visiting Jason Severance, age 11. "He looks like Freddie (the killer) in 'Nightmare on Elm Street,' " Severance said of the metallic skeleton. Coincidentally, perhaps, Jor-el's message at the opening of the "The Age of Intelligence Machines" exhibition was that humans have nothing to fear from artificially intelligent machines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1988
Spokesmen for the Los Angeles Coliseum complex and the business partnership that is proposed to run the facilities are calling unacceptable a request from the state Museum of Science and Industry for partial veto power over events at the Coliseum and Sports Arena. Museum officials have expressed concern that a private Coliseum manager might schedule so many events that traffic jams and lack of parking could adversely affect attendance at the adjacent Exposition Park museums.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1987 | STEVE HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Sure, airliners often arrive late these days, but . . . a DC-8 in a three-year-long holding pattern south of USC? The retired jet, donated by United Airlines, is Los Angeles' Aluminum Goose, the front-yard showpiece of the California Museum of Science and Industry. And passers-by still register surprise over the sight of a 118-foot-long plane at the corner of Figueroa and Exposition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1987 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
As is often the case with truly monumental discoveries, the exact origin of ice cream has been lost to history. No anthropologist has detected traces of hot fudge on the pots found in the ancients' graves. No etymologist can say with certainty who first uttered the term ice cream , let alone who first ate it. So, anyone searching for the cold, hard facts will have to sift through legends of the past as well as the advertising slogans of the present.
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