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BUSINESS
June 19, 2002 | From Associated Press
The California Power Authority announced a program Tuesday to pay large industrial power users to cut consumption. Those customers will be paid less than the cost for actual electricity. The program has several advantages over building new power plants, said Power Authority Chief Executive Laura Doll, and companies won't have to shut down completely to meet their obligation.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
California needs a $3-billion investment in new high-voltage transmission lines to avert electricity shortages and reduce costs before a wholesale market can work, State Treasurer Phil Angelides said Tuesday. "We don't have a grid that can support a truly competitive market," Angelides said, stressing that California imports 30% of its power supplies and needs new connections to other states.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
California needs a $3-billion investment in new high-voltage transmission lines to avert electricity shortages and reduce costs before a wholesale market can work, State Treasurer Phil Angelides said Tuesday. "We don't have a grid that can support a truly competitive market," Angelides said, stressing that California imports 30% of its power supplies and needs new connections to other states.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2003 | Nancy Rivera Brooks, Times Staff Writer
S. David Freeman, the cowboy-hat-wearing former general manager of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, has made a career out of wrangling electrons. Now Freeman has set his sights on gas guzzlers -- including Gov.-elect Arnold Schwarzenegger's Hummer.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2003 | Nancy Rivera Brooks, Times Staff Writer
S. David Freeman, the cowboy-hat-wearing former general manager of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, has made a career out of wrangling electrons. Now Freeman has set his sights on gas guzzlers -- including Gov.-elect Arnold Schwarzenegger's Hummer.
OPINION
August 27, 2003
"Davis Still Can Ease Power Rates," by Harvey Rosenfield (Commentary, Aug. 21), is misleading about what happened and what could have happened during California's energy crisis, and what is happening now. Rosenfield accuses the governor of "capitulat[ing] to the blackout blackmail." It is outrageous to suggest that California should have invited power outages. The recent East Coast blackout made clear the consequences resulting from widespread blackouts. Gov. Gray Davis took necessary steps in the face of well-documented manipulation of the energy market to keep the lights on. Davis implemented the nation's most successful conservation program, speeded the licensing of new power plants and entered into long-term contracts at prices one-fifth of what we were then paying, contracts that supported the construction of new power plants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1994
City Controller Rick Tuttle called Wednesday for an audit of a regional utility agency with $3.7 billion in bond debt for which the city is partially liable. An audit of the Southern California Public Power Authority would coincide with ongoing efforts to streamline the Department of Water and Power, Tuttle said in a letter to the City Council. "I urge the council to take swift and aggressive action to assure the public . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2000 | PETER NAVARRO, Peter Navarro, an associate professor of economics and public policy at UC Irvine, is the author of "The Dimming of America" (Ballinger, 1984). E-mail: pnavarro@uci.edu
If irony were electricity, the state wouldn't have a shortage. Witness that Southern California Edison is demanding a 10% rate hike after promising us a 10% rate decrease; that the legislative architect of the state's deregulation fiasco wants to take $2 billion of the state's budget surplus to correct his mistake; and that Gov. Gray Davis is now promising to deliver us all from the deregulation dragon after ignoring the problem for his term so far.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2005 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power has led a group of cities in buying natural gas reserves in Wyoming for $300 million to help ensure a stable supply for its power plants, officials announced Wednesday. The DWP signed a purchase agreement with Anschutz Pinedale Corp. in Denver to buy a portion of the company's natural gas reserves in Sublette County, officials said.
OPINION
August 21, 2003
The Bush administration isn't shy about using a crisis to advance a political agenda. It parlayed fear in the wake of terrorist attacks into the broad intrusions and civic roadblocks of the USA Patriot Act. It turned worries over the stalled economy into big tax cuts for the rich.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2002 | From Associated Press
The California Power Authority announced a program Tuesday to pay large industrial power users to cut consumption. Those customers will be paid less than the cost for actual electricity. The program has several advantages over building new power plants, said Power Authority Chief Executive Laura Doll, and companies won't have to shut down completely to meet their obligation.
OPINION
March 25, 2002
Not so long ago, natural gas was the darling fuel of California's electric power industry. There was lots of it. It was cheap. And much cleaner to burn than the fuel oil that then powered most generating plants. Older plants switched to it. Now California needs to begin weaning itself from its heavy reliance on natural gas, which fires roughly half the electric power generated in the state. The state needs to diversify by developing more renewable energy sources.
OPINION
June 24, 2001
For six months, Californians have been riding an energy crisis that is like some movie monster--a weird, hard-to-comprehend creature that morphs and fragments day by day. Now, finally, the state is gaining a measure of control. The threat of near-constant rolling blackouts through the summer is fading, though not gone, and Washington has halfheartedly come to the rescue. What's still needed is a long-term plan, a way to turn this monstrous puzzle into a coherent whole.
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