Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCalifornia Primary Elections 2000
IN THE NEWS

California Primary Elections 2000

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Last fall, when California moved its presidential primary to March 2000, state political insiders fairly rubbed their hands in glee at their sheer cleverness. No longer would the nation's biggest, most important state watch as tiny domains like Iowa and New Hampshire hogged all the candidates' attention. For once, White House hopefuls would have to come to California to address the "big picture," instead of the trifling concerns of those parochial provinces. Or so it was said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2000 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
It is the first California election of the century, a door opening to the future. And it certainly represents a break from the past: The presidential contests for both major parties are alive, to one degree or another. Many adult Californians, for the first time in their lives, will be voting in a presidential primary that matters. For months, Democrats Al Gore and Bill Bradley, and Republicans George W. Bush, John McCain and Alan Keyes, have crossed the state, searching for votes.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 2, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Come next March, millions of Californians will do something they've never done before: vote in a presidential primary that matters. Thanks to its earliest date ever--March 7--and a drastically truncated nominating process, the California primary is shaping up as the decisive event of the early 2000 campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2000 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Locked in a bitter fight to win the Democratic Party nomination in the 29th state Senate District, candidates Richard Melendez and Steve Herfert reflect a new wave of grass-roots politics stretching across a swath of east Los Angeles County from Sierra Madre to La Mirada. Both serve on the City Council in West Covina, a diverse city that reflects the changing demographics of the San Gabriel Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2000
Monday is the last day to register to vote for the March 7 primary election. Who Can Register: Under California election laws, people entitled to vote must be U.S. citizens, at least 18 years old at the time of election and a California resident for 29 days before the election. If you move within 28 days of the election, you can vote by returning to your former precinct or by obtaining an absentee ballot for that precinct.
NEWS
March 2, 2000
Election day is Tuesday. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Absentee ballots must be received at the registrar of voters office by 8 p.m. election day, or they may be dropped off at any polling location on election day. How to Find Your Polling Place * Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters (800) 815-2666 http://rrcc.co.la.ca.us/ppq * Orange County Registrar of Voters (714) 567-7600 http://www.oc.ca.gov/election * Riverside County Registrar of Voters (909) 486-7200 http://www.co.riverside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2000 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Locked in a bitter fight to win the Democratic Party nomination in the 29th state Senate District, candidates Richard Melendez and Steve Herfert reflect a new wave of grass-roots politics stretching across a swath of east Los Angeles County from Sierra Madre to La Mirada. Both serve on the City Council in West Covina, a diverse city that reflects the changing demographics of the San Gabriel Valley.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of Californians either registered to vote or switched their party affiliations on Monday's deadline--an above-average surge that may boost turnout for the state's unusual March 7 presidential primary, election officials said. Californians can vote for any presidential candidate in the primary, but to earn nominating delegates for that candidate, they must belong to his party.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging that his campaign for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate is imperiled by lack of money, state Sen. Ray Haynes of Riverside has made an urgent appeal for contributions from about 30,000 potential donors. "Honestly stated, things are desperate," Haynes said in an e-mail to the conservative faithful this week. "You are my only hope to pull this one off."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2000 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
It is the first California election of the century, a door opening to the future. And it certainly represents a break from the past: The presidential contests for both major parties are alive, to one degree or another. Many adult Californians, for the first time in their lives, will be voting in a presidential primary that matters. For months, Democrats Al Gore and Bill Bradley, and Republicans George W. Bush, John McCain and Alan Keyes, have crossed the state, searching for votes.
NEWS
March 2, 2000
Election day is Tuesday. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Absentee ballots must be received at the registrar of voters office by 8 p.m. election day, or they may be dropped off at any polling location on election day. How to Find Your Polling Place * Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters (800) 815-2666 http://rrcc.co.la.ca.us/ppq * Orange County Registrar of Voters (714) 567-7600 http://www.oc.ca.gov/election * Riverside County Registrar of Voters (909) 486-7200 http://www.co.riverside.
NEWS
March 2, 2000
Californians will vote Tuesday in a blanket primary. Any registered voter can cast a ballot for any candidate from any party. The names of all the candidates will appear together on a single ballot. In the presidential race, Secretary of State Bill Jones' office will tally the popular vote, but only votes cast by members of a candidate's party will count in awarding delegates to the national conventions. Democrats will decide which candidate gets the Democratic delegates, for example.
NEWS
March 2, 2000
Candidates for president as they appear on the California ballot. The order is determined by a random drawing.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | GEORGE SKELTON
Gov. George W. Bush has been fretting that Democratic voters are going to crash the Republican party in South Carolina on Saturday and create mischief. Maybe they'll later act out in other states too, he suggests. The Texan professes to worry that Democrats--who he seems to think spend their leisure time digesting political polls and watching C-SPAN--are cynically plotting to help nominate the Republican presidential candidate most likely to get beaten in November.
NEWS
February 15, 2000 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hello, California. The nation's costliest political ad wars begin here today, with Texas Gov. George W. Bush and Sen. John McCain of Arizona set to blitz viewers with millions of dollars worth of TV commercials in key markets across the state. Bush, using a one-two punch, will air one ad harshly criticizing McCain for an ad he has already pulled in South Carolina and a second seeking to position himself rather than McCain as the genuine Washington outsider.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of Californians either registered to vote or switched their party affiliations on Monday's deadline--an above-average surge that may boost turnout for the state's unusual March 7 presidential primary, election officials said. Californians can vote for any presidential candidate in the primary, but to earn nominating delegates for that candidate, they must belong to his party.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging that his campaign for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate is imperiled by lack of money, state Sen. Ray Haynes of Riverside has made an urgent appeal for contributions from about 30,000 potential donors. "Honestly stated, things are desperate," Haynes said in an e-mail to the conservative faithful this week. "You are my only hope to pull this one off."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2000
Monday is the last day to register to vote in the March 7 primary. Eligible voters: U.S. citizens who are at least 18 by election day and California residents for 29 days before the election. If you move within 28 days of the election, you can vote at your former precinct or obtain an absentee ballot for that precinct. Individuals who are in prison or on parole for a felony are ineligible. Reasons to register or re-register: You have never registered. You have moved since the last election.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|