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BUSINESS
February 17, 1994 | Greg Johnson / Times staff writer
Head-Turning Gimmick: The California Restaurant Assn. will use a giant "upside-down chef" to send a message to President Clinton. Attendees at the CRA's Southern California Foodservice Exposition at the Anaheim Convention Center on March 20 and 21 will write their opinion of Clinton's health care plan on a giant figure of an upside-down chef.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2008 | Daniela Perdomo, Times Staff Writer
Curry Mendes moved to Los Angeles last week from New York, where he had picked restaurants based on word of mouth and Zagat reviews. But he quickly learned that many people in L.A. choose restaurants based on the big letter grade affixed by the L.A. County Department of Public Health to the front of nearly 38,000 restaurants and other businesses that sell food ready to eat.
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BUSINESS
March 18, 1993 | Greg Johnson / Times staff writer
They Don't Cater to Kids: The California Restaurant Assn. doesn't say what will happen to violators, but a recent press release makes very clear that youngsters won't be welcome at the organization's upcoming Southern Counties Foodservice Expo that opens April 18 in San Diego. "No one under 16 years of age, including infants in strollers or backpacks, will be admitted under any circumstances," the press release says.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2002 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Restaurant Assn. is unveiling a program today for its 18,000 member restaurants that will screen potential hires by using, among other things, reports from credit bureaus and the Department of Motor Vehicles. The association says the service is aimed at addressing the industry's long-standing problem with high turnover as well as more recent concerns about food and water safety since Sept. 11. The checks require consent from prospective employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his starched white chef's hat and jacket, Pierre Pelech fretted over renewed talk about banning all cigarette smoking in restaurants in Los Angeles. "It would be catastrophic for the restaurant business," said Pelech, co-owner of Pierre's restaurant in Los Feliz. "There would be a drop in business, and that would put people out of work." A raspy voice from the restaurant bar added: "I don't mind cigarette smoke."
BUSINESS
October 28, 1990 | BRADLEY INMAN
For years, proposals to ban smoking in public places have incensed the California Restaurant Assn. Then, this summer, the 3,000-member trade group came out with a surprise announcement: It would support a ban on smoking in all public places. But there was a catch: The support would come only if "such regulation is rendered on a statewide basis."
BUSINESS
July 26, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Michael Rhodes, 34, entered the restaurant business at age 16 as a cook. He managed his first restaurant at 19 and worked for a Los Angeles-based chain before founding Orange-based Frontier Restaurants Inc., which owns eight Russell's Famous Hamburgers locations and five Knollwood family restaurants. Another Knollwood is scheduled to open early in 1994. In May, Rhodes was elected president of the Orange County chapter of the California Restaurant Assn.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what it says is a significant change of heart and not a change in tactics, the California Restaurant Assn. declared Tuesday that it would support an outright, statewide smoking ban in restaurants--but only if smoking is also banned in all other public places. The organization, representing owners of about 10,000 restaurants, said its decision is largely an acknowledgment of new data on the risks of secondhand smoke.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2002 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Restaurant Assn. is unveiling a program today for its 18,000 member restaurants that will screen potential hires by using, among other things, reports from credit bureaus and the Department of Motor Vehicles. The association says the service is aimed at addressing the industry's long-standing problem with high turnover as well as more recent concerns about food and water safety since Sept. 11. The checks require consent from prospective employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2008 | Daniela Perdomo, Times Staff Writer
Curry Mendes moved to Los Angeles last week from New York, where he had picked restaurants based on word of mouth and Zagat reviews. But he quickly learned that many people in L.A. choose restaurants based on the big letter grade affixed by the L.A. County Department of Public Health to the front of nearly 38,000 restaurants and other businesses that sell food ready to eat.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1994 | Greg Johnson / Times staff writer
Head-Turning Gimmick: The California Restaurant Assn. will use a giant "upside-down chef" to send a message to President Clinton. Attendees at the CRA's Southern California Foodservice Exposition at the Anaheim Convention Center on March 20 and 21 will write their opinion of Clinton's health care plan on a giant figure of an upside-down chef.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Michael Rhodes, 34, entered the restaurant business at age 16 as a cook. He managed his first restaurant at 19 and worked for a Los Angeles-based chain before founding Orange-based Frontier Restaurants Inc., which owns eight Russell's Famous Hamburgers locations and five Knollwood family restaurants. Another Knollwood is scheduled to open early in 1994. In May, Rhodes was elected president of the Orange County chapter of the California Restaurant Assn.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1993 | Greg Johnson / Times staff writer
They Don't Cater to Kids: The California Restaurant Assn. doesn't say what will happen to violators, but a recent press release makes very clear that youngsters won't be welcome at the organization's upcoming Southern Counties Foodservice Expo that opens April 18 in San Diego. "No one under 16 years of age, including infants in strollers or backpacks, will be admitted under any circumstances," the press release says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his starched white chef's hat and jacket, Pierre Pelech fretted over renewed talk about banning all cigarette smoking in restaurants in Los Angeles. "It would be catastrophic for the restaurant business," said Pelech, co-owner of Pierre's restaurant in Los Feliz. "There would be a drop in business, and that would put people out of work." A raspy voice from the restaurant bar added: "I don't mind cigarette smoke."
BUSINESS
October 28, 1990 | BRADLEY INMAN
For years, proposals to ban smoking in public places have incensed the California Restaurant Assn. Then, this summer, the 3,000-member trade group came out with a surprise announcement: It would support a ban on smoking in all public places. But there was a catch: The support would come only if "such regulation is rendered on a statewide basis."
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what it says is a significant change of heart and not a change in tactics, the California Restaurant Assn. declared Tuesday that it would support an outright, statewide smoking ban in restaurants--but only if smoking is also banned in all other public places. The organization, representing owners of about 10,000 restaurants, said its decision is largely an acknowledgment of new data on the risks of secondhand smoke.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
And the Lifetime Achievement award goes to...Susan Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken. That would be the Elizabeth Burns Lifetime Achievement Award, to be exact, presented by the Los Angeles chapter of the California Restaurant Association at Hotel Casa del Mar on June 7th. Some 30 years ago Feniger and Milliken were the new kids on the block, cooking from a small storefront on Melrose Avenue next to the L.A. Eyeworks store. The two young cooks met in a tough French kitchen in Chicago at a time when a woman in a professional kitchen was still a rarity - and in a French kitchen practically unheard of. But the two stuck it out, formed a friendship and eventually ended up in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1992 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cheesecake Factory, a Calabasas-based restaurant chain and bakery known for its stylish and high volume restaurants, plans a $35-million stock offering to raise cash for the company to expand. But the initial public stock offering by the 20-year-old company will enrich its owners nearly as much as it will provide the company capital for expansion. Almost half of the net proceeds from the stock offering are set to go to current owners--including $13.
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