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NEWS
May 16, 1990 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's astonishing growth during the 1980s--the biggest human surge by any state in U.S. history--has made it home to more than 30 million people, including every sixth baby born within the nation's borders, a private population study reported Tuesday. California added 6 million people in the '80s, "more than any state has or ever will gain in one decade," the Palo Alto-based Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy said.
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OPINION
December 26, 2007
Re "More flee state than move in," Dec. 20 The Times underplays California's population growth from immigration by stating that growth over the last year rested on "births and the arrival of more than 200,000 immigrants." Who gave birth to all those children? In fact, almost half of California's babies are born to immigrant mothers. By reducing immigration, California (and the nation) could reduce births as well.
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OPINION
December 26, 2007
Re "More flee state than move in," Dec. 20 The Times underplays California's population growth from immigration by stating that growth over the last year rested on "births and the arrival of more than 200,000 immigrants." Who gave birth to all those children? In fact, almost half of California's babies are born to immigrant mothers. By reducing immigration, California (and the nation) could reduce births as well.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2002
James Flanigan treats California's budget deficit as a failure of political courage to raise taxes, although it actually reflects the state's growing overpopulation ["Government Debt, Not Policies, Could Threaten Business Climate," Sept. 25]. He criticizes inadequate spending on roads, schools, water and housing. These infrastructure shortages reveal how California's population has outgrown economies of scale and reached the point of diminishing returns. As Flanigan himself archly observes, even the state's high home prices, high taxes and "poor business climate" never stopped its population growth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2001
Re "And Then There Were 33.9 Million of Us," Census 2000, March 30: As Peter King pointed out, California is not growing, California's population is. As the nation's leader in total population, population growth and the No. 1 destination for immigrants, nowhere is change as dramatically evident as it is here. "Growth is good" has long been the mantra of both politicians seeking to bolster constituency and employers seeking to reduce labor costs, but it should start to ring hollow with those of us who have to live with it. High immigration levels over the last two decades have translated into a much poorer quality of life for Californians.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2002
James Flanigan treats California's budget deficit as a failure of political courage to raise taxes, although it actually reflects the state's growing overpopulation ["Government Debt, Not Policies, Could Threaten Business Climate," Sept. 25]. He criticizes inadequate spending on roads, schools, water and housing. These infrastructure shortages reveal how California's population has outgrown economies of scale and reached the point of diminishing returns. As Flanigan himself archly observes, even the state's high home prices, high taxes and "poor business climate" never stopped its population growth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1989
A state study ranks Riverside and San Bernardino as the first- and second-fastest growing counties when measured against other of the larger counties in California. Overall, counties in Southern California continue to grow faster than those in the northern part of the state. Los Angeles, of course, remains the state's largest county while the five counties in the area account for 49% of California's population. RANK OUT OF 58 COUNTIES POPULATION POPULATION INCREASE COUNTY 1980 1988 APRIL 1980 APRIL 1988 1980-1988 Los Angeles 1 1 7,477,421 8,604,300 1,126,879 Orange 2 3 1,932,921 2,261,100 328,179 San Bernardino 6 5 895,016 1,284,900 389,884 Riverside 9 7 663,199 977,400 314,201 Ventura 12 11 529,174 846,700 117,526 PERCENTAGE COUNTY INCREASE Los Angeles 15.1% Orange 17.0 San Bernardino 43.6 Riverside 47.4 Ventura 22.2 Source: State Department of Finance
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1993
Clinton's economic stimulus package was defeated because a Senate rule allows debate on an issue to continue indefinitely unless 60 senators vote to end it. Maybe it's time to scrap not only this undemocratic rule but the undemocratic Senate itself, in which a state like Wyoming gets two senators, the same as California, even though California's population is about 65 times larger. JON SCHULTZ Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1988
Parker assumes the strangest reason for the shortages of schools, jobs and homes during his lifetime when he blames the no-growth movement. In fact the reason is the opposite. It was growth that caused the shortages. He forgot to check the population figures. From 1950 to 1980 California's population more than doubled, from 10.5 million to 23.6 million. WENDELL W. NORRIS Del Mar
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California added 793,000 residents in 1990, breaking a 47-year record for population growth, a state report says. The state Department of Finance report estimates California's population as of Jan. 1 at 30,351,000, an increase of 512,000 since the national census last spring. The one-year increase of 793,000 breaks the record of 771,000 new residents set in 1943, during World War II. But on a percentage basis, the population boom of 1943, when California had only 8.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2001
Re "And Then There Were 33.9 Million of Us," Census 2000, March 30: As Peter King pointed out, California is not growing, California's population is. As the nation's leader in total population, population growth and the No. 1 destination for immigrants, nowhere is change as dramatically evident as it is here. "Growth is good" has long been the mantra of both politicians seeking to bolster constituency and employers seeking to reduce labor costs, but it should start to ring hollow with those of us who have to live with it. High immigration levels over the last two decades have translated into a much poorer quality of life for Californians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1998
Re "Line Drawn in 1848 Shaped Who We Are," by Frank del Olmo, Commentary, March 1: In 1848 Mexico lost its vast northern territories to the United States and there should be no surprise that Mexicans saw (and perhaps continue to see) their northern neighbor as an imperialistic bully. But to suggest (as Del Olmo does) that in 1848 the United States got also "a whole lot of Mexican Americans," which, in turn, shaped who we are today is simply laughable. It is time to realize that for all practical purposes California had never really been Mexican.
NEWS
January 27, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California was a big loser of residents to other states between July 1994 and July 1995, but immigration and births kept the state population growing modestly, the Census Bureau reported Friday. California had 31,589,000 residents on July 1, an increase of 181,000 for the year, a gain of just 0.6% compared with the national growth rate of 0.9%. In the 12-month period, 383,000 people moved to other states, fewer than in the peak period in 1993-94 but still substantial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1994
Demographers tell us they make projections, not predictions. Your editorial ("A Demographic Lesson: Warnings about state population explosion missed the mark," Feb. 13) stated that demographer Leon Bouvier in 1991 projected a state population of 50 million by 2011. Bouvier actually made three projections--high, medium, and low. The figures you cited were from his high-level projections. His medium-level projection showed California reaching 50 million by 2016 and the low projection showed the state attaining that figure by 2040.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1993
Clinton's economic stimulus package was defeated because a Senate rule allows debate on an issue to continue indefinitely unless 60 senators vote to end it. Maybe it's time to scrap not only this undemocratic rule but the undemocratic Senate itself, in which a state like Wyoming gets two senators, the same as California, even though California's population is about 65 times larger. JON SCHULTZ Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1992
Is anyone really surprised by SCAG's new population growth projections for Southern California (July 23)? They shouldn't be. California's population has doubled roughly every 25 years for the last century, a growth rate that more closely resembles Third World countries than a developed nation. And we have the highest fertility rate of any state in the nation. The predictions of persistent high unemployment, infrastructure problems and declining standard of living shouldn't surprise anyone either.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1992
Is anyone really surprised by SCAG's new population growth projections for Southern California (July 23)? They shouldn't be. California's population has doubled roughly every 25 years for the last century, a growth rate that more closely resembles Third World countries than a developed nation. And we have the highest fertility rate of any state in the nation. The predictions of persistent high unemployment, infrastructure problems and declining standard of living shouldn't surprise anyone either.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
California's population grew last year by a record 772,400, fueled by the highest net migration total since World War II, state population experts said Friday. The state's estimated population, according to the Demographic Research Unit of the Department of Finance, hit 29,473,400 on Jan. 1, 1990. That was a 2.7% increase in a year. California's growth included a record number of births, minus deaths, of 333,990, plus net migration of 438,410.
OPINION
December 22, 1991 | Tony Quinn, Tony Quinn, vice president of Braun Ketchum Public Relations, was the principal author of "An Analysis of the 1990 Census in California," prepared for the Governor's Office of Planning and Research
Pete Wilson has bad political luck: Vast changes in the profile of California's population in the 1980s have given him a set of problems that would challenge any governor's leadership talent, let alone his composure. By bringing attention to how foreign immigration strains California's ability to deliver services, for example, Wilson hit on what will probably be a prominent theme in state politics in the '90s. For this he was roundly condemned for playing David Duke politics. Too bad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California added 793,000 residents in 1990, breaking a 47-year record for population growth, a state report says. The state Department of Finance report estimates California's population as of Jan. 1 at 30,351,000, an increase of 512,000 since the national census last spring. The one-year increase of 793,000 breaks the record of 771,000 new residents set in 1943, during World War II. But on a percentage basis, the population boom of 1943, when California had only 8.
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