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California Seismic Safety Commission

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1997
"Ban on High-Rise Construction Near Major Faults Urged" (May 9) exaggerated our testimony during a meeting of the California Seismic Safety Commission. The topic was the unusually large and rapid ground displacements that can be produced by a big earthquake at certain locations close the rupturing fault. One of us (Heaton) questioned the wisdom of constructing flexible buildings close to major faults, since flexible structures are more vulnerable to such ground motions than are stiff, strong ones.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2011 | Rong-Gong Lin II and Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
The 7.2 earthquake that rattled the U.S.-Mexico border in 2010 — the largest temblor to hit Southern California in nearly two decades — has exposed a hidden weakness in school seismic safety that officials are now trying to correct. The Easter Sunday temblor was centered south of Mexicali but was felt strongly in several Imperial County communities. Schools withstood the shaking structurally, but the damage was still extensive. Walkway coverings cracked and collapsed; light fixtures crashed to the floor; electrical wires were exposed; water and gas lines ruptured; and classroom ceilings and roofs were damaged.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2007 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
James E. Slosson, a former state geologist who helped establish the California Seismic Safety Commission, which provides guidelines for reducing earthquake hazards, has died. He was 84. Slosson died of congestive heart failure April 28 at Encino-Tarzana Regional Medical Center, his daughter-in-law, Lynn Slosson, said Friday. He was a longtime resident of Sherman Oaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2007 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
James E. Slosson, a former state geologist who helped establish the California Seismic Safety Commission, which provides guidelines for reducing earthquake hazards, has died. He was 84. Slosson died of congestive heart failure April 28 at Encino-Tarzana Regional Medical Center, his daughter-in-law, Lynn Slosson, said Friday. He was a longtime resident of Sherman Oaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2011 | Rong-Gong Lin II and Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
The 7.2 earthquake that rattled the U.S.-Mexico border in 2010 — the largest temblor to hit Southern California in nearly two decades — has exposed a hidden weakness in school seismic safety that officials are now trying to correct. The Easter Sunday temblor was centered south of Mexicali but was felt strongly in several Imperial County communities. Schools withstood the shaking structurally, but the damage was still extensive. Walkway coverings cracked and collapsed; light fixtures crashed to the floor; electrical wires were exposed; water and gas lines ruptured; and classroom ceilings and roofs were damaged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1994
If we needed any further stimulus to prepare for more earthquakes it came Sunday afternoon with the 5.3 aftershock. We live in a shaky basin that sometimes seems almost unsuited for human habitation. It has become the urbanized home of 15 million people through human dominion over a beautiful though sometimes terrible natural environment. We learned what happens when our economic lifeblood, the freeways, are cut, and about the benefits of mass transit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1994 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blaming shoddy design, construction and inspection for much of the damage in the Northridge earthquake, the California Seismic Safety Commission has called for new laws requiring additional training for architects, engineers, contractors and code enforcement officials. Meeting this week, the commission tentatively agreed on the education requirements and several other recommendations. But it postponed final action on an already overdue report that Gov. Pete Wilson requested on the adequacy of current seismic construction standards.
NEWS
January 21, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day started with an easy boat trip from Osaka to the partly reopened port of Kobe, a city once again teeming with activity. It ended after a 12-mile trek, with a grimly unsuccessful rescue attempt that left the executive director of California's Seismic Safety Commission, L. Thomas Tobin, saying he wished that some of Sacramento's politicians could see this place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2006 | Sharon Bernstein, Times Staff Writer
As San Francisco commemorated the 100th anniversary of the great quake of 1906, a drama of another sort was roiling the California seismic safety community. Shortly after Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger marked the anniversary by promising to improve seismic safety in the state, one of his aides told two outspoken members of the California Seismic Safety Commission that they were being removed from office -- effective immediately. One was Lucy Jones, the U.S.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blaming shoddy design, construction and inspection for much of the damage in the Northridge earthquake, the California Seismic Safety Commission has called for new laws requiring additional training for architects, engineers, contractors and code-enforcement officials. The commission, meeting this week, tentatively agreed on the educational requirements and several other recommendations. But it postponed final action on an already overdue report Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2006 | Sharon Bernstein, Times Staff Writer
As San Francisco commemorated the 100th anniversary of the great quake of 1906, a drama of another sort was roiling the California seismic safety community. Shortly after Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger marked the anniversary by promising to improve seismic safety in the state, one of his aides told two outspoken members of the California Seismic Safety Commission that they were being removed from office -- effective immediately. One was Lucy Jones, the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2004 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
In its final report on the deadly San Simeon earthquake, the state's Seismic Safety Commission on Friday called on Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and the Legislature to require that 8,700 unreinforced masonry buildings be retrofitted within five years. The commission's recommendation, if carried out, would mark a significant shift in state policy on seismic retrofitting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2004 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
The state Seismic Safety Commission, meeting here for a two-day hearing on the San Simeon earthquake of Dec. 22, has issued a strong denunciation of moves in the Legislature to scale back provisions of the state's Field Act, which requires school buildings to have seismic safeguards. The commission voted to oppose a bill by state Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1997
"Ban on High-Rise Construction Near Major Faults Urged" (May 9) exaggerated our testimony during a meeting of the California Seismic Safety Commission. The topic was the unusually large and rapid ground displacements that can be produced by a big earthquake at certain locations close the rupturing fault. One of us (Heaton) questioned the wisdom of constructing flexible buildings close to major faults, since flexible structures are more vulnerable to such ground motions than are stiff, strong ones.
NEWS
August 11, 1996 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The independent commission that recommends earthquake safety standards for California and conducts broad reviews of the state's largest quakes is battling with the Wilson administration. In its latest rebuff to the governor's office, the 17-member Seismic Safety Commission last month rejected both of the administration's recommendations for executive director and instead picked a staff member unpopular with Wilson aides.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Northridge earthquake would have inflicted far less damage if building codes had been rigorously enforced, according to a state Seismic Safety Commission report that castigates engineers, designers and building officials for failing to heed the lessons of other disastrous temblors. The commission found that California has slipped behind schedule in meeting goals established a decade ago to bolster the state's efforts to safeguard buildings, utilities and roadways from earthquake losses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Seismic Safety Commission's report to the governor on lessons learned from the Northridge earthquake has been delayed for months, in part because commissioners and staff members have disagreed about how hard-hitting the recommendations should be for reforming building codes and land-use planning.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Seismic Safety Commission on Wednesday halted publication of its long-delayed report to Gov. Pete Wilson on the Northridge earthquake, deciding instead to reopen debate on some key recommendations already made to the governor.
NEWS
March 4, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Seismic Safety Commission, rebuffed by the Legislature four years ago when it proposed a policy and timetable for alleviating earthquake hazards in state buildings, decided Friday to lead a new effort to reduce hazards in all the state's buildings, public and private. The commission decided to include in its report on the Northridge earthquake, now expected to be delivered to Gov.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Seismic Safety Commission on Wednesday halted publication of its long-delayed report to Gov. Pete Wilson on the Northridge earthquake, deciding instead to reopen debate on some key recommendations already made to the governor.
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