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California Solid Waste Management Board

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
Despite Los Angeles city officials' claims that the action could shut down their only city-owned trash dump, the California Waste Management Board voted Friday to affirm a staff order calling for stricter limits on dumping at the Lopez Canyon landfill. Appearing before the state board, Los Angeles officials reiterated their warnings that they will be forced to close Lopez Canyon landfill within days if the state restrictions are enforced.
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NEWS
September 30, 1989 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to turn around California's dubious distinction as the nation's top producer of garbage, Gov. George Deukmejian on Friday signed an eight-bill package to promote recycling and reduce by half the amount of trash going into landfills by the year 2000. The new program is expected to drive up garbage collection fees for most Californians and require the curbside separation of garbage in many communities.
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NEWS
August 31, 1989 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian and legislative leaders have agreed to create a powerful new state agency to oversee solid waste disposal but still are negotiating over the makeup of the new board and whether incineration should be a part of the package, sources said Wednesday. Major strides toward an agreement were made during a closed-door meeting Tuesday when the Republican governor gave in on some key points and offered legislative leaders a compromise plan to create the new board, sources said.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian and legislative leaders tentatively agreed Tuesday to include incineration as part of a long-term strategy to reduce solid waste in California by 50% before the year 2000. The plan that emerged from a closed-door meeting in Deukmejian's Capitol office would place the major emphasis for solid waste reduction on recycling and other methods of reusing refuse, such as turning leaves into compost.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian and legislative leaders tentatively agreed Tuesday to include incineration as part of a long-term strategy to reduce solid waste in California by 50% before the year 2000. The plan that emerged from a closed-door meeting in Deukmejian's Capitol office would place the major emphasis for solid waste reduction on recycling and other methods of reusing refuse, such as turning leaves into compost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1989 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
The California Waste Management Board unanimously voted Thursday to strip Los Angeles County officials of their powers to enforce health and safety standards at 83 county trash dumps and transfer stations if county health officials do not toughen their approach during the next month. If the state board follows through with its action, it will be the first time since the board's 1973 formation that it has stripped an agency of local control, said board spokesman Chris Peck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1989 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge--saying she fears that Los Angeles could be buried in garbage--issued an order Wednesday preventing the California Waste Management Board from limiting trash dumping at the Lopez Canyon Landfill for at least four weeks. The city Bureau of Sanitation had said it would have to close the dump within days--at least temporarily--if the state were successful in imposing limits on the height of garbage mounds at the municipal landfill.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to turn around California's dubious distinction as the nation's top producer of garbage, Gov. George Deukmejian on Friday signed an eight-bill package to promote recycling and reduce by half the amount of trash going into landfills by the year 2000. The new program is expected to drive up garbage collection fees for most Californians and require the curbside separation of garbage in many communities.
NEWS
July 15, 1989 | MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writer
The state agency that regulates waste dumping has imposed restrictions on the operation of the Lopez Canyon Landfill where about 66% of Los Angeles' household trash is dumped. City officials predicted that the order could force the closure of the dump, at least temporarily, putting pressure on other dumps and forcing the city to use costly private landfills scattered around the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1996 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO
Thousand Oaks is offering several new nature-friendly activities and events as an expansion of its environmental education program. TOTV, the city's government channel, has begun airing a weekly cable television program focusing on creative ways to protect the environment. "Children's Corner for the Environment" airs Saturdays from 10 a.m to noon.
NEWS
August 31, 1989 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian and legislative leaders have agreed to create a powerful new state agency to oversee solid waste disposal but still are negotiating over the makeup of the new board and whether incineration should be a part of the package, sources said Wednesday. Major strides toward an agreement were made during a closed-door meeting Tuesday when the Republican governor gave in on some key points and offered legislative leaders a compromise plan to create the new board, sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1989 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge--saying she fears that Los Angeles could be buried in garbage--issued an order Wednesday preventing the California Waste Management Board from limiting trash dumping at the Lopez Canyon Landfill for at least four weeks. The city Bureau of Sanitation had said it would have to close the dump within days--at least temporarily--if the state were successful in imposing limits on the height of garbage mounds at the municipal landfill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
Despite Los Angeles city officials' claims that the action could shut down their only city-owned trash dump, the California Waste Management Board voted Friday to affirm a staff order calling for stricter limits on dumping at the Lopez Canyon landfill. Appearing before the state board, Los Angeles officials reiterated their warnings that they will be forced to close Lopez Canyon landfill within days if the state restrictions are enforced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1989 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
The California Waste Management Board unanimously voted Thursday to strip Los Angeles County officials of their powers to enforce health and safety standards at 83 county trash dumps and transfer stations if county health officials do not toughen their approach during the next month. If the state board follows through with its action, it will be the first time since the board's 1973 formation that it has stripped an agency of local control, said board spokesman Chris Peck.
NEWS
July 15, 1989 | MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writer
The state agency that regulates waste dumping has imposed restrictions on the operation of the Lopez Canyon Landfill where about 66% of Los Angeles' household trash is dumped. City officials predicted that the order could force the closure of the dump, at least temporarily, putting pressure on other dumps and forcing the city to use costly private landfills scattered around the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1989 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
The California Solid Waste Management Board has directed the Los Angeles County Health Department to order the Lopez Canyon Landfill to discontinue, within 10 days, several "unlawful practices", including piling garbage too high, a board spokesman said Monday. It was the state board's first acknowledgement that the Los Angeles city-run dump was operating illegally, as has long been claimed by some neighbors of the East San Fernando Valley facility.
NEWS
August 30, 1989 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Assembly Speaker Willie Brown said Tuesday that counties--rather than the state--may be asked to administer family planning programs under a compromise plan aimed at restoring $24 million vetoed from the programs by Gov. George Deukmejian. But Brown said the governor wants to release the money in such a way that none of it would be used for abortion counseling.
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