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California State Prison At Chowchilla

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August 31, 1997 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heroin underground here at the largest women's prison in America never stops scheming, a nimble supplier of drugs and hypodermic needles and butane lighters, each commanding a swindler's price. Officials at the Central California Women's Facility say they have tried to upset the flow, but the drugs--black tar heroin, crack, speed, marijuana--keep finding a way past the walls of this sprawling compound amid the farm fields of the San Joaquin Valley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three female inmates were charged with second-degree murder in the October beating death of another inmate at a women's prison in Chowchilla. Tonea Ashline, 32, Alejandra Calderon, 27, and Leticia Velasquez, 36, were also charged with involuntary manslaughter and assault, Madera County Dist. Atty. Ernest LiCalsi said. The three are accused of beating Patricia Ann Toledo, 36, in a prison yard fight at Valley State Prison for Women.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three female inmates were charged with second-degree murder in the October beating death of another inmate at a women's prison in Chowchilla. Tonea Ashline, 32, Alejandra Calderon, 27, and Leticia Velasquez, 36, were also charged with involuntary manslaughter and assault, Madera County Dist. Atty. Ernest LiCalsi said. The three are accused of beating Patricia Ann Toledo, 36, in a prison yard fight at Valley State Prison for Women.
NEWS
August 31, 1997 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heroin underground here at the largest women's prison in America never stops scheming, a nimble supplier of drugs and hypodermic needles and butane lighters, each commanding a swindler's price. Officials at the Central California Women's Facility say they have tried to upset the flow, but the drugs--black tar heroin, crack, speed, marijuana--keep finding a way past the walls of this sprawling compound amid the farm fields of the San Joaquin Valley.
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