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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court indicated Wednesday that federal law appeared to prevent immigrants without green cards from obtaining licenses to practice law. During a hearing in a packed courtroom, several justices suggested they were bound to follow a law passed by Congress that denies professional licenses to immigrants who are in the country illegally. The state high court is considering a bid by Sergio C. Garcia, 36, a Mexican immigrant who has spent most of his life in California, passed the state bar examination and has been waiting 18 years to obtain a green card.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- The California Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday on whether a Mexican immigrant in the United States without legal permission who graduated from law school and passed the bar should be licensed as a lawyer. Sergio C. Garcia , 36,  has been trying to get his California law license for fours years. The State Bar of California and Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris support his bid. But the Obama administration has told the state high court that federal law prohibits giving a license or “public benefit” to “an unlawfully present alien.” The court is expected to decide Garcia's fate within 90 days after Wednesday's hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2013 | By Jack Leonard
The California Supreme Court on Wednesday denied a last-ditch bid to stop the release of a serial rapist to Los Angeles County, clearing the way for Christopher Hubbart to be freed once suitable housing has been found. The justices rejected without comment Dist. Atty. Jackie Lacey's request for a new hearing on whether Hubbart, 62, should be released in Santa Clara County, where he committed his most recent crimes, rather than Los Angeles. Hubbart, who has spent nearly two decades in a state mental hospital, admitted sexually assaulting more than three dozen women throughout California between 1971 and 1982, according to the district attorney's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2013 | By Jack Leonard
The California Supreme Court on Wednesday denied a last-ditch bid to stop the release of a serial rapist to Los Angeles County, clearing the way for Christopher Hubbart to be freed once suitable housing has been found. The justices rejected without comment Dist. Atty. Jackie Lacey's request for a new hearing on whether Hubbart, 62, should be released in Santa Clara County, where he committed his most recent crimes, rather than Los Angeles. Hubbart, who has spent nearly two decades in a state mental hospital, admitted sexually assaulting more than three dozen women throughout California between 1971 and 1982, according to the district attorney's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court unanimously rejected an attempt Wednesday to revive Proposition 8, ending the pending legal challenges over the 2008 ballot initiative that banned same-sex marriage. The state high court's decision, made in closed conference, does not foreclose future attempts in other courts to stop the marriages, though the chance of any new bid succeeding appeared dim. The court issued its decision in a brief order that did not explain the justices' reasoning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Schools may provide trained employees instead of licensed nurses to administer insulin injections and other medications to students, the California Supreme Court decided unanimously Monday. In a defeat for the California Nurses Assn., the state high court overturned a  ruling in favor of the nurses by Chief Justice Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye when she was on an appeals court. The chief justice did not participate in the case once it reached the high court. "California law expressly permits trained, unlicensed school personnel to administer prescription medications such as insulin in accordance with the written statements of a student's treating physician and parents," Justice Kathryn Mickle Werdegar wrote for the court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - California schools may give students insulin injections and other medications without having to call in licensed nurses, the state's highest court ruled Monday. "California law expressly permits trained, unlicensed school personnel to administer prescription medications such as insulin in accordance with the written statements of a student's treating physician and parents," Justice Kathryn Mickle Werdegar wrote for the California Supreme Court. The unanimous decision was a defeat for the powerful California Nurses Assn., which had argued that only licensed healthcare workers could administer medicine under a state law that bars the unauthorized practice of nursing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2013 | By Lee Romney
BERKELEY, Calif. -- Advocacy groups on Thursday filed a class-action federal lawsuit against Contra Costa County's juvenile hall, alleging that some youths with disabilities are being denied educational services and held in solitary confinement for 23 hours per day -- in some cases for months. The Los Angeles-based Public Counsel and Berkeley-based Disability Rights Advocates teamed with a private law firm to bring the lawsuit, contending that while one-third of students at the county juvenile hall are deemed by authorities to have disabilities requiring special education, many do not receive those or related services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- The California Supreme Court rejected a citizen group's challenge Monday of a planned light rail system from Culver City to Santa Monica, ruling that an environmental review provided the public with sufficient information. In a fractured decision, four members of the state high court found that the review should have contained an analysis of the project's near-term impact on traffic and air quality. Six of the seven justices nevertheless agreed the review was legally valid, and one justice would have rejected it. The Exposition Metro Line Construction Authority approved the rail project even though the review of traffic and air quality impacts relied on a baseline of conditions in the year 2030.
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