Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCalifornia Wages And Salaries
IN THE NEWS

California Wages And Salaries

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
A state commission voted narrowly Friday to raise California's minimum wage to $4.25 an hour, the highest in the nation, in an action that drew loud cheers from laborers who took an all-night bus ride from Los Angeles to be here for the decision. The 27% increase, approved by a 3-2 vote of the Industrial Welfare Commission, will take effect July 1. The rise will make the state's minimum wage higher than the federal minimum, which has been $3.35 an hour since 1981.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 27, 2000
Starting Jan. 1, the minimum wage in California will increase 50 cents to $6.25 per hour. The hike was approved in October, along with another 50-cent increase Jan. 1, 2002, to $6.75 an hour. Employers and employees can get information on the changes by calling the California Department of Industrial Relations at (888) 275-9243. The message is available in English, Spanish and Chinese. Those who do not receive the raise can file a wage claim with the Department of Industrial Relations.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state commission is expected Monday to raise California's minimum wage by $1 an hour over the next two years, starting with a 50-cent boost Jan. 1. The hike would directly benefit more than 1 million California workers who now earn the minimum of $5.75 per hour or close to it. The impact would be felt most deeply in Los Angeles, home to a large class of immigrant workers who are chronically employed in full-time minimum wage jobs, such as assembly and food processing.
NEWS
November 26, 2000
California ranked third in average annual pay increase last year. The nationwide average of 4.3% was down from 5.2% in 1998. Percentage increase for workers covered by state and federal unemployment insurance programs, U.S. and selected states in 1999: Washington: 8.0% Massachusetts: 6.8 California: 6.3 Colorado: 6.0 Virginia: 5.2 U.S.: 4.3 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
NEWS
March 27, 1988
Lawyers for workers affected by California's proposed new sub-minimum wage say the new category is a subterfuge to let employers pay tipped workers less. They are seeking a court ruling to block it. The proposed wage would pay waiters, waitresses and other tipped employees $3.50 an hour, or 75 cents less than the minimum pay for other workers. A restaurant industry spokesman said that tipped workers already are making more than the minimum wage.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1987 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
California's farm labor law, which once offered the promise of helping California farm workers out of poverty, has been dying a slow death since Gov. George Deukmejian took office in 1983. Latest data from the Agricultural Labor Relations Board that administers the law shows, as one board member said, "an incredible shrinkage in the amount of work we have to do."
BUSINESS
December 27, 2000
Starting Jan. 1, the minimum wage in California will increase 50 cents to $6.25 per hour. The hike was approved in October, along with another 50-cent increase Jan. 1, 2002, to $6.75 an hour. Employers and employees can get information on the changes by calling the California Department of Industrial Relations at (888) 275-9243. The message is available in English, Spanish and Chinese. Those who do not receive the raise can file a wage claim with the Department of Industrial Relations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1987
Several black community groups Monday urged the state Industrial Welfare Commission to increase the state minimum wage to $5.01 an hour from $3.35. "We all see the minimum wage as depriving blacks and other minorities and keeping them in a state of poverty," said the Rev. Bill Johnson of the South-Central Organizing Committee. "They are unable to eat nutritionally and not able to pay adequate rents and medical bills.
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state commission is expected Monday to raise California's minimum wage by $1 an hour over the next two years, starting with a 50-cent boost Jan. 1. The hike would directly benefit more than 1 million California workers who now earn the minimum of $5.75 per hour or close to it. The impact would be felt most deeply in Los Angeles, home to a large class of immigrant workers who are chronically employed in full-time minimum wage jobs, such as assembly and food processing.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A labor panel appointed by Gov. Gray Davis wants to raise California's minimum wage from $5.75 to $6.75 an hour by 2002, making it one of the nation's highest. The Industrial Welfare Commission on Thursday formally endorsed the proposal. The increase would consist of two 50-cent raises, one in January and another a year later, when Davis is running for reelection.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting on a centerpiece of organized labor's agenda, the state Assembly on Thursday night approved legislation requiring overtime pay to workers after an eight-hour workday. The measure by Assemblyman Wally Knox (D-Los Angeles), passed by a 48-30 margin, restores the eight-hour overtime rule that was repealed two years ago by Republican Gov. Pete Wilson's administration. Currently, overtime for millions of employees doesn't kick in until 40 hours are worked in a single week.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Millions of Americans are scheduled to get a raise today when the federally mandated minimum wage rises to $5.15 an hour. In California, the increase is 15 cents an hour, up from the state minimum of $5 an hour. But across most of the United States, fast-food workers, retail clerks, gas-station attendants and others will be earning 40 cents an hour more when they report to work as the second phase of a federal hike goes into effect. California and federal wage laws are leapfrogging each other.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The minimum hourly wage for hundreds of thousands of California workers rises today by 25 cents to $5. The increase stems from the overwhelming approval of union-backed Proposition 210 by voters in November. It marks the second rise in the minimum wage received by workers in the state in five months. In addition, two more increases--another federal increase and then a second state boost--will occur over the next 12 months, lifting the minimum wage to $5.75 in March 1998.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1997 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California will rack up double-digit growth in jobs, income and population in the next 10 years, outpacing the nation's economic expansion, a California economic institute reported Tuesday. California in the year 2005 will have 38.2 million people, a 10-year gain of 18.5%, according to the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy. Those Californians will be working at 17.4 million jobs, a 19% increase, the study said, and enjoy total income of $1.1 trillion, a 35% gain.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson declared his opposition Friday to demands from organized labor to raise the California minimum wage above $4.25 an hour, saying any increase would harm the people it is meant to help most: minorities, youngsters and first-time job-seekers. The Republican governor detailed his opposition at a press conference where he also announced the appointment of former state labor commissioner Lloyd Aubry, 40, as his director of industrial relations.
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | DAN MORAIN and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writers
A little-known but powerful state commission Friday recommended a 65-cent hike in the minimum wage to $4 an hour for many California workers, but gave large numbers of younger wage earners a raise of only a nickel over the current $3.35 minimum hourly rate. The Industrial Welfare Commission's proposed $4-an-hour wage would be make California's rate higher than all states but one--Connecticut will pay $4.25 next year--and would be the first increase in the state in more than six years.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raising the minimum wage, widely considered an issue with broad public appeal, has turned out to be a tougher-than-expected sell to voters across the country. That realization, political observers say, could chill some of the campaigns emerging from coast to coast to boost the wages of the working poor. Unions and their allies scored their biggest minimum wage victory in Tuesday's voting in California, where Proposition 210 captured nearly 62% of the vote.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1995 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Californians are getting their lowest raises in more than 25 years--an average of 3.7%--and, despite improving economic conditions, may face layoffs or disruptive reorganizations in the workplace this year, according to a survey by compensation consultant William M. Mercer Inc. The decline in pay raises for California employees, from 3.8% last year, continues the downward trend begun in 1990, according to Mercer.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|