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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1998 | SUE FOX
After a brief crisis that left sick and orphaned wildlife in the southwest Valley without anyone to rescue them, the California Wildlife Center in Calabasas has agreed to care for the animals for at least six weeks. The arrangement spares the wildlife--including two ducklings and a baby wren so far--from being euthanized.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2009 | Bob Pool
He's one traffic accident victim that from now on will be watching for oncoming cars like a hawk. That's because the Hollywood resident that returned home Saturday after being hospitalized more than a month with injuries from a presumed car collision is a hawk. Wildlife experts from a Calabasas animal rehabilitation center returned a red-tailed hawk that had been injured in November to the busy urban neighborhood it calls home. The bronze and white bird was found Dec.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998
The state Coastal Commission has approved the creation of a wildlife rehabilitation center on Piuma Road in Malibu Canyon. The facility would care for all wounded wild animals except sea mammals, said Rebecca Dmytryk, the co-director of the center. Dmytryk formed the nonprofit organization Wildlife Emergency Response two years ago as a paramedic service for animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2003 | Wendy Thermos, Times Staff Writer
Bill Kepler and his 10-year-old son, Remy, peered into a rustic birdcage crafted from small tree branches and watched glossy green hummingbirds flitting among red geraniums, a favorite food source of the tiny creatures. When they drove Saturday from their Pasadena home to the California Wildlife Center near Calabasas, they expected to see lots of other denizens of the wilderness at the animal rehabilitation facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS
There's no place like home. For a baby barn owl nicknamed Igor, home is the chimney he fell out of two weeks ago, suffering life-threatening injuries. After being nursed back to health by workers from the Monte Nido-based California Wildlife Center, Igor was returned to his nest and family Tuesday. He joined two siblings, one biological and the other adopted during Igor's convalescence. "We expect all three will survive," said Rebecca Dmytryk, president of the wildlife center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
About 60 people attended a "baby shower" Saturday at Malibu Creek State Park to raise funds for the care of young wildlife. "We thought it would attract people and remind them baby wildlife need help too," said Rebecca Dmytryk, founder and president of the California Wildlife Center. "We're trying to replenish baby animal supplies." The center's three staff members and about 30 volunteers go into the wild to treat injured animals or bring them back to the center for care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Songbirds slam into windows. Deer misjudge fences they're trying to hurtle. Pelicans gulp down wads of fishing line. Nature has a hard enough time managing on its own. Mix in highways, off-road vehicles, garden rakes, fishing nets--even plain old dogs and cats--and wildlife is bound to run into trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1999 | ART MARROQUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just after 2 a.m. when the emergency hotline rang. Rebecca Dmytryk woke from a deep sleep and clambered for the phone. "Hello," she mumbled. "There's a coyote that was hit by a car," a caller said. "It's lying in the road and he's barely moving." Dmytryk perked up, threw on a pair of jeans and grabbed some bags filled with medical equipment. She hopped into her car and drove from her Calabasas home about eight miles to Malibu, praying that the coyote was still alive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2003 | Wendy Thermos, Times Staff Writer
Bill Kepler and his 10-year-old son, Remy, peered into a rustic birdcage crafted from small tree branches and watched glossy green hummingbirds flitting among red geraniums, a favorite food source of the tiny creatures. When they drove Saturday from their Pasadena home to the California Wildlife Center near Calabasas, they expected to see lots of other denizens of the wilderness at the animal rehabilitation facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2009 | Bob Pool
He's one traffic accident victim that from now on will be watching for oncoming cars like a hawk. That's because the Hollywood resident that returned home Saturday after being hospitalized more than a month with injuries from a presumed car collision is a hawk. Wildlife experts from a Calabasas animal rehabilitation center returned a red-tailed hawk that had been injured in November to the busy urban neighborhood it calls home. The bronze and white bird was found Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Songbirds slam into windows. Deer misjudge fences they're trying to hurtle. Pelicans gulp down wads of fishing line. Nature has a hard enough time managing on its own. Mix in highways, off-road vehicles, garden rakes, fishing nets--even plain old dogs and cats--and wildlife is bound to run into trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
About 60 people attended a "baby shower" Saturday at Malibu Creek State Park to raise funds for the care of young wildlife. "We thought it would attract people and remind them baby wildlife need help too," said Rebecca Dmytryk, founder and president of the California Wildlife Center. "We're trying to replenish baby animal supplies." The center's three staff members and about 30 volunteers go into the wild to treat injured animals or bring them back to the center for care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1999 | ART MARROQUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just after 2 a.m. when the emergency hotline rang. Rebecca Dmytryk woke from a deep sleep and clambered for the phone. "Hello," she mumbled. "There's a coyote that was hit by a car," a caller said. "It's lying in the road and he's barely moving." Dmytryk perked up, threw on a pair of jeans and grabbed some bags filled with medical equipment. She hopped into her car and drove from her Calabasas home about eight miles to Malibu, praying that the coyote was still alive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS
There's no place like home. For a baby barn owl nicknamed Igor, home is the chimney he fell out of two weeks ago, suffering life-threatening injuries. After being nursed back to health by workers from the Monte Nido-based California Wildlife Center, Igor was returned to his nest and family Tuesday. He joined two siblings, one biological and the other adopted during Igor's convalescence. "We expect all three will survive," said Rebecca Dmytryk, president of the wildlife center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1998 | SUE FOX
After a brief crisis that left sick and orphaned wildlife in the southwest Valley without anyone to rescue them, the California Wildlife Center in Calabasas has agreed to care for the animals for at least six weeks. The arrangement spares the wildlife--including two ducklings and a baby wren so far--from being euthanized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998
The state Coastal Commission has approved the creation of a wildlife rehabilitation center on Piuma Road in Malibu Canyon. The facility would care for all wounded wild animals except sea mammals, said Rebecca Dmytryk, the co-director of the center. Dmytryk formed the nonprofit organization Wildlife Emergency Response two years ago as a paramedic service for animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
The rare, ribbon-shaped sea creature was far from home when it washed ashore in Malibu this week. Darrell Rae was on a Sunday morning stroll on Malibu Colony beach when he spotted the 12-foot-long silvery fish with a brilliant red mane and scarlet dorsal fin floundering in the water a few dozen feet from the shore. "I grew up on the beaches and I had never seen or even heard of anything like it," the 40-year-old marketing manager said, "so I knew it had to be something that came from far away and deep in the ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1999 | ART MARROQUIN
Injured wild animals will have a place to heal when the California Wildlife Center opens today in Calabasas. The center's founders received three acres of developed parkland from the state Department of Parks and Recreation and converted an old home on the property into a wildlife hospital. The center will be funded by donations and grants from private organizations. "A center like this is needed in Los Angeles," said Rebecca Dmytryk, the center's director of administration.
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