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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1998 | SUE FOX
After a brief crisis that left sick and orphaned wildlife in the southwest Valley without anyone to rescue them, the California Wildlife Center in Calabasas has agreed to care for the animals for at least six weeks. The arrangement spares the wildlife--including two ducklings and a baby wren so far--from being euthanized.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Songbirds slam into windows. Deer misjudge fences they're trying to hurtle. Pelicans gulp down wads of fishing line. Nature has a hard enough time managing on its own. Mix in highways, off-road vehicles, garden rakes, fishing nets--even plain old dogs and cats--and wildlife is bound to run into trouble.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998
The state Coastal Commission has approved the creation of a wildlife rehabilitation center on Piuma Road in Malibu Canyon. The facility would care for all wounded wild animals except sea mammals, said Rebecca Dmytryk, the co-director of the center. Dmytryk formed the nonprofit organization Wildlife Emergency Response two years ago as a paramedic service for animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
About 60 people attended a "baby shower" Saturday at Malibu Creek State Park to raise funds for the care of young wildlife. "We thought it would attract people and remind them baby wildlife need help too," said Rebecca Dmytryk, founder and president of the California Wildlife Center. "We're trying to replenish baby animal supplies." The center's three staff members and about 30 volunteers go into the wild to treat injured animals or bring them back to the center for care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS
There's no place like home. For a baby barn owl nicknamed Igor, home is the chimney he fell out of two weeks ago, suffering life-threatening injuries. After being nursed back to health by workers from the Monte Nido-based California Wildlife Center, Igor was returned to his nest and family Tuesday. He joined two siblings, one biological and the other adopted during Igor's convalescence. "We expect all three will survive," said Rebecca Dmytryk, president of the wildlife center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
About 60 people attended a "baby shower" Saturday at Malibu Creek State Park to raise funds for the care of young wildlife. "We thought it would attract people and remind them baby wildlife need help too," said Rebecca Dmytryk, founder and president of the California Wildlife Center. "We're trying to replenish baby animal supplies." The center's three staff members and about 30 volunteers go into the wild to treat injured animals or bring them back to the center for care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Songbirds slam into windows. Deer misjudge fences they're trying to hurtle. Pelicans gulp down wads of fishing line. Nature has a hard enough time managing on its own. Mix in highways, off-road vehicles, garden rakes, fishing nets--even plain old dogs and cats--and wildlife is bound to run into trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1999 | ART MARROQUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just after 2 a.m. when the emergency hotline rang. Rebecca Dmytryk woke from a deep sleep and clambered for the phone. "Hello," she mumbled. "There's a coyote that was hit by a car," a caller said. "It's lying in the road and he's barely moving." Dmytryk perked up, threw on a pair of jeans and grabbed some bags filled with medical equipment. She hopped into her car and drove from her Calabasas home about eight miles to Malibu, praying that the coyote was still alive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1999 | ART MARROQUIN
Injured wild animals will have a place to heal when the California Wildlife Center opens today in Calabasas. The center's founders received three acres of developed parkland from the state Department of Parks and Recreation and converted an old home on the property into a wildlife hospital. The center will be funded by donations and grants from private organizations. "A center like this is needed in Los Angeles," said Rebecca Dmytryk, the center's director of administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO
Like many newborns, these babies need bottle warmers, towels, bed sheets and Pedialyte infant supplements. But unlike their tiny human counterparts, wild baby critters also have much more specialized needs--from rodent food to trout chow and dove seed. The public is invited to bring these and other gifts to assist the California Wildlife Center at a Wildlife Baby Shower today at Malibu Creek State Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1999 | ART MARROQUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just after 2 a.m. when the emergency hotline rang. Rebecca Dmytryk woke from a deep sleep and clambered for the phone. "Hello," she mumbled. "There's a coyote that was hit by a car," a caller said. "It's lying in the road and he's barely moving." Dmytryk perked up, threw on a pair of jeans and grabbed some bags filled with medical equipment. She hopped into her car and drove from her Calabasas home about eight miles to Malibu, praying that the coyote was still alive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS
There's no place like home. For a baby barn owl nicknamed Igor, home is the chimney he fell out of two weeks ago, suffering life-threatening injuries. After being nursed back to health by workers from the Monte Nido-based California Wildlife Center, Igor was returned to his nest and family Tuesday. He joined two siblings, one biological and the other adopted during Igor's convalescence. "We expect all three will survive," said Rebecca Dmytryk, president of the wildlife center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1998 | SUE FOX
After a brief crisis that left sick and orphaned wildlife in the southwest Valley without anyone to rescue them, the California Wildlife Center in Calabasas has agreed to care for the animals for at least six weeks. The arrangement spares the wildlife--including two ducklings and a baby wren so far--from being euthanized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998
The state Coastal Commission has approved the creation of a wildlife rehabilitation center on Piuma Road in Malibu Canyon. The facility would care for all wounded wild animals except sea mammals, said Rebecca Dmytryk, the co-director of the center. Dmytryk formed the nonprofit organization Wildlife Emergency Response two years ago as a paramedic service for animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2009 | Martha Groves
For the fourth time, the city of Malibu has helped secure a federal grant for the California Wildlife Center in Calabasas. The money -- $80,520 -- will aid the facility's mission of rescuing and rehabilitating seals, sea lions and dolphins along the Malibu coastline. The John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Grant is awarded annually by the National Marine Fisheries Service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Department of Commerce. "These funds will significantly help us continue our efforts in improving rescue programs, upgrading the center's equipment and promoting protection of wildlife," said Cynthia Reyes, the center's director of marine mammal response.
OPINION
December 9, 2012
Re "Malibu's great blight whale," Dec. 7 Once again we're reminded of the dangers that large whales face along the West Coast. Whales are forced to dodge ships traveling into port. Many don't make it. Ship strikes are one of the biggest remaining threats to the recovery of whales, and in the last decade they have become all too common. Our busy shipping lanes on the West Coast overlap with important foraging habitat for whales. The federal government, charged with protecting endangered species, needs to impose mandatory speed limits on vessels in whale habitats.
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