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April 21, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
With open enrollment for Obamacare wrapped up, insurance giant Anthem Blue Cross stayed ahead of the pack in California and widened its lead over rival Blue Shield of California. Anthem signed up 425,058 people through April 15, or 30% of Covered California's exchange market under the Affordable Care Act, new data show. Anthem is a unit of Indianapolis-based WellPoint Inc., the nation's second-largest health insurer. San Francisco insurer Blue Shield of California trails Anthem with a 27% share, or 381,457 enrollees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By a Times Staff Writer
For the first time,  the number of Latinos from California offered freshman admission to the University of California was larger than that for whites. Reflecting demographic trends, 28.8% of those admitted to at least one UC campus were Latino, compared with 26.8% white. At 36.2%, Asian Americans again made up the largest ethnic group among admitted students from California. Blacks from California were just 4.2%, a number that officials said was disturbingly low. "It remains a difficult issue for the university," said Stephen Handel, UC's associate vice president for undergraduate admissions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Sichen Hernandez-Martinez is the type of undergraduate who is increasingly in demand at four-year colleges: She had been a community college honors student, a member of campus government and was active in school clubs. After three years at Chaffey College in Rancho Cucamonga, she was admitted to USC, UC Riverside and Cal State San Bernardino. She accepted a scholarship to Pomona College, a selective, private school in Claremont, which she entered as a junior this year. The Pomona admissions committee was as impressed with her academics as it was with her community involvement.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
The job : Bill Dombrowski is president of the California Retailers Assn., a trade group based in Sacramento that includes most of the country's largest store chains, including 7-Eleven Inc., Safeway Inc., Macy's Inc., Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Home Depot Inc. For the last 20 years, he's crafted political and legislative strategies for the association, whose members generate more than $570 billion in annual sales and employ nearly 2.8 million people....
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
Southern California's office market has improved ever so slightly - once again for landlords. In the just-finished first quarter of 2014, the overall vacancy rate fell less than a percentage point and monthly rents ticked up a nickel per square foot. The slight upward shift in occupancy was typical of the last several quarters. The region's office rental market stabilized after the recession, but has not picked up steam the way it did during previous economic recoveries. Nevertheless, vacancy is reaching its lowest level since 2008, when the Great Recession hit and prompted a downward trend in office use that finally is turning around, albeit at a glacial pace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | Larry Gordon and Carla Rivera
California high school seniors faced a tougher time winning a freshman spot at most of the UC campuses for the fall, with their chances at UCLA and UC Berkeley now fewer than one in five, according to a report released Friday. Six of UC's nine undergraduate campuses accepted a smaller number of California students than last year even though the number of applicants rose. Competition was fiercest at UCLA, where only 16.3% of state students were admitted, down from 17.4% last year, and at UC Berkeley, where 18.8% were accepted, compared with 21.4% last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
A controversy-riddled water district involved in a federal corruption investigation is in danger of losing its insurance, a political black eye that could have implications for the agency and its 2 million customers. The Assn. of California Water Agencies Joint Powers Insurance Authority has recommended to its board that it drop the employment liability insurance for Central Basin Municipal Water District, citing the circus-like atmosphere at the agency. The authority insures hundreds of water districts across the state, and this would be only the second time in its 35-year history that it canceled coverage for a water district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
The State Water Project, which helps supply a majority of Californians, will make small deliveries this year, officials said Friday as they increased the system's allocation to 5% from the historic zero announced in January. February and March storms in Northern California raised the levels of the state's two largest reservoirs enough to allow federal water managers to also significantly boost deliveries to wildlife refuges and irrigation districts with the most senior water rights in the Sacramento Valley.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
A magnitude 7.2 temblor hit Mexico on Friday, with shaking felt across much of the country. Is it just me, oh fellow residents of La La Land, or does it feel like - in earthquake-speak  - the Big One is getting just a little too close for comfort? No, no, I'm not basing this on some new scientific theory. Conversely, no, my cat has not been acting oddly. It's just that, well, there's been a whole lot of shaking going on lately.    Friday's Mexico quake came on the heels of the magnitude 8.2 temblor that rocked Chile on April 1. And then there's the recent swarm of quakes in central Utah , the largest being a magnitude 4.9 on April 13. Plus, of course, Los Angeles' own “little” shaker on March 28, a magnitude 5.1 quake that rattled buildings - and nerves - across the region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - Soon after Jerry Brown was elected governor in 2010, he invited the state's top budget official, Ana Matosantos, to lunch at his office. He had just two months to prepare his first plan for tackling California's $26-billion deficit. He asked his assistant to fetch the budget director a sandwich. Then, Matosantos said, the incoming governor of one of the world's largest economies ate a single hard-boiled egg, sprinkled with salt. Brown's dietary discipline was a hint of the regimented approach he would take to California's staggering financial problems, which he had promised to fix by pushing the state back into the black.
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