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Callaway Golf Co

BUSINESS
July 8, 2001 | James F. Peltz
Ely Callaway, a feisty, daring former textile executive and vintner who revolutionized golf for pros and duffers alike with oversized metal clubs and in the process built an $840-million company while in his 70s, died Thursday of pancreatic cancer. He was 82. Callaway, whose Big Bertha driver quickly became a staple in golfers' bags after its debut a decade ago, had retired as Callaway Golf Co.'s chief executive after the cancer was found in April but had remained chairman of the board.
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BUSINESS
August 18, 1999 | A Times Staff Writer
Ely Callaway, the colorful founder of Callaway Golf Co., designated a successor to take over for him as chief executive of the golf club maker when he retires, which could be between now and next year. Chuck Yash, who has been president and chief executive of Callaway's subsidiary, Callaway Golf Ball Co., will serve as president of the Carlsbad-based parent in the meantime. Yash, 50, will also continue to head the golf ball unit, which will introduce its first product in January.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Callaway Golf Co. on Wednesday posted a narrower third-quarter loss as a 72% jump in sales exceeded Wall Street expectations, but earnings were hampered by restructuring costs. Carlsbad-based Callaway said it lost $4.8 million, or 7 cents a share, compared with a loss of $35.9 million, or 53 cents, a year earlier. Revenue rose to $220.6 million.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Callaway Golf Co. said it filed a lawsuit against Spalding & Evenflo Cos.' Sports Worldwide Inc., alleging that Spalding intends to mislead consumers by selling golf balls in packaging that uses Callaway's name. In the suit filed in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, Callaway alleges Spalding is claiming its new ball is designed to be the longest-driving and most accurate golf ball a player can use with three different Callaway clubs. Carlsbad, Calif.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2002 | From Reuters
Callaway Golf Co. appeared to be nearing the rough after warning Thursday that its third-quarter and full-year revenue and profit will fall short of targets. Sales of its new titanium driver, it said, may not offset softness in the golf equipment business. Citing weak consumer spending in the United States, Japan and elsewhere, Callaway sees third-quarter sales of $155 million to $160 million and earnings per diluted share of 13 cents to 15 cents.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1998 | Bloomberg News
A U.S. district judge denied a motion by Callaway Golf Co. to prevent Evenflo & Spalding Holding Corp.'s Spalding Sports Worldwide Inc. from selling golf balls in packaging that uses Callaway Golf's name. After a one-hour hearing, Judge Alicemarie Stotler in Santa Ana dismissed Callaway's lawsuit that sought a temporary injunction to prevent Spalding from shipping the Top-Flite Ball/Club System C golf ball, which it says is designed to match Callaway's clubs.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1998 | Bloomberg News
A U.S. District Court judge denied a motion by Callaway Golf Co. to prevent Evenflo & Spalding Holding Corp. from selling golf balls in packaging that uses Callaway Golf's name. After a one-hour hearing, U.S. District Judge Alicemarie Stotler dismissed a lawsuit by Carlsbad-based Callaway that sought a temporary injunction to prevent Spalding from shipping the Top-Flite Ball / Club System C golf ball, which it says is designed to match Callaway's clubs.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2003 | From Reuters
Golf equipment maker Callaway Golf Co. on Wednesday posted strong quarterly earnings but cautioned that it did not expect the traditional start of the golf season to provide the usual lift to sales in the current quarter. The Carlsbad-based maker of Big Bertha drivers and woods stuck to its full-year forecast despite the higher-than-expected first-quarter profit, warning that a range of factors, including the war in Iraq and the SARS virus, had battered consumer confidence.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Callaway Golf Co. of Carlsbad, Calif., said second-quarter profit jumped 23% but fell short of Wall Street expectations. Callaway said it earned $22.5 million, or 33 cents a share, compared with $18.4 million, or 27 cents, a year earlier. Results include 3 cents a share in stock-option costs and 2 cents in one-time charges. Excluding items, Callaway earned 38 cents a share, less than the 45 cents expected by analysts polled by Thomson Financial. Revenue grew 5.8% to $341.8 million.
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