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Caller Id

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BUSINESS
June 20, 2013 | David Lazarus
Ed Stoecker's brief, unintended and unhappy stint as a telemarketer occurred recently when he spent several days receiving angry calls from people who didn't appreciate his bothering them. "They all saw my number on their caller ID screen," Stoecker, 58, told me. "They were upset that I seemed to have called them and then hung up just as they picked up the phone, like I was a robo-caller. " Needless to say, he wasn't the culprit. Stoecker was a victim of a growing problem called spoofing, a telephone sleight of hand that allows a scammer, telemarketer or debt collector to trick a caller ID system.
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BUSINESS
February 21, 2014 | David Lazarus
Maybe Capital One should take a course in remedial English. The credit card issuer seems to be having a tough time communicating relatively simple ideas. Betty Rome, for example, would be thousands of dollars wealthier now had Cap One expressed itself clearly. Instead, she says, the company spent months trying to trick her into opening an account she didn't want. Yet that corporate misdirection pales in comparison to the Cap One contract update I wrote about Tuesday. The company recently informed its millions of cardholders that "we may contact you in any manner we choose," including a "personal visit" to your home or workplace.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1992
This Caller ID controversy ("Telephone Line With a Hook," July 15) has me a bit annoyed. If I wish to subscribe to a call-screening service and you feel your privacy is being violated or if you have an unlisted number you wish to keep private, I have a perfect solution for your problem. Just do not call me. Isn't that simple? Since you have my phone number and are able to call me, aren't I entitled to the same privilege of knowing your phone number? Also I certainly should have the opportunity to screen the phone calls I receive if I so desire.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2013 | David Lazarus
Ed Stoecker's brief, unintended and unhappy stint as a telemarketer occurred recently when he spent several days receiving angry calls from people who didn't appreciate his bothering them. "They all saw my number on their caller ID screen," Stoecker, 58, told me. "They were upset that I seemed to have called them and then hung up just as they picked up the phone, like I was a robo-caller. " Needless to say, he wasn't the culprit. Stoecker was a victim of a growing problem called spoofing, a telephone sleight of hand that allows a scammer, telemarketer or debt collector to trick a caller ID system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1998
Your Sept. 23 editorial, "Confusion Calling," is confusing itself. There has been a near-hysterical bias in California against caller ID, to the extent that many Californians blindly signed up for complete blocking without understanding the issues. The FCC has mandated that your number go out on every call, blocked or not. The blocked number isn't displayed to the people being called, but they know that you've put your electronic "thumb" over their residential telephonic "peep-hole."
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | Dave Wilson
In the movie "Along Came a Spider," currently showing at your local googleplex, police psychologist Alex Cross has a tape recorder hooked up to his home phone, which lets him capture the telephonic rantings of the homicidal maniacs he pursues. This slightly flabby thriller has Cross listening to a recording over and over in an attempt to locate a psycho who's kidnapped a little girl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1996 | ED BOND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On June 1, California could become the last state in the nation to allow Caller ID, making it possible for those being called to see the originating phone number. Critics say the feature helps telemarketers build a database of numbers. Supporters say it gives customers more flexibility in answering calls while still allowing numbers to be blocked.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1997
Privacy-conscious Californians appear to be giving thumbs down to caller ID. In the seven months since Pacific Bell began offering the service, only 5% of 9.6 million residential customers have requested it, Pac Bell parent Pacific Telesis Group said. Caller ID lets customers screen calls by displaying the caller's number. Ten percent of residential customers nationwide subscribe. Despite the low response, Pac Bell plans to introduce a feature later this year that displays the caller's name
BUSINESS
August 23, 1992
Perhaps those on both sides of the fuss over caller ID could take a tip from the DMV, "Pac Bell May Hang Up on Caller ID" (July 14). Although cars don't display the owner's addresses or phone number, they do display a unique ID that allows the authorities to identify the owner should the need arise. So why not offer caller ID with the option of displaying a name or "handle" instead of your number? If the display showed something like "213 BUBBLES" or "818 SF FAN 3," your friends and family could recognize you without you giving away your actual number.
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the great privacy wars of the information age, California is about to add a deceptively simple, hotly controversial piece of telephone technology known as Caller ID. Its function could hardly be more straightforward: Phone lines equipped with Caller ID make it possible to see the originating phone number of an incoming call. It's not exactly an untested technology.
SPORTS
November 2, 2009 | Mike Penner
Regardless of what former referee Tim Donaghy might say in a book that remains unpublished, preferential treatment for NBA superstars from officials is a tradition and a culture that has existed for decades. Kevin McHale, now a TNT studio analyst, remembers breaking in with the Boston Celtics, with Larry Bird as a teammate. "I go up to do what I think is a good block, and they blow the whistle," said McHale, whose first season was 1980-81. "They yell, 'Foul on No. 32.' I said, '32?
OPINION
November 10, 2008
Re "Palin returns home to a chillier Alaska," Nov. 7, and "She shops here? You betcha," Nov. 7 Regarding Sarah Palin's approval ratings having "tumbled" from 80% to 65%, I wonder how many other governors have an approval rating that high? And since the campaign is over, isn't it about time to end your "destroy Sarah Palin" campaign -- time to end the divisiveness you progressives so abhor? How about more articles about the person who will become vice president -- you know, the guy who thinks "jobs" is a three-letter word, thinks President Franklin Roosevelt came on TV in 1929, and guarantees an international crisis to test Barack Obama?
BUSINESS
July 17, 2007 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Millions of Californians will start paying several dollars a month more for land-line phone service after AT&T's second price increase for custom-calling features since the state lifted rate caps last year. The nation's biggest phone carrier this week boosted the cost of caller ID, call waiting and a host of other features for a la carte phone service.
NEWS
September 24, 2006 | Becky Yerak, Chicago Tribune
Caller ID isn't the crystal ball that it used to be. Revered for years by persnickety consumers who like to screen their telephone calls, the premium service is being appropriated by identity thieves. Such scams are made possible by technology that enables con artists to manipulate the phone number and even the name that shows up on the unsuspecting recipient's caller ID, allowing scammers to masquerade as officials of churches, banks and courthouses.
NEWS
March 5, 2006 | Peter Svensson, Associated Press Writer
Last fall, U.S. Rep. Tim Murphy's office started getting phone calls from constituents who complained about receiving recorded phone messages that bad-mouthed Murphy. The constituents were especially upset that the messages appeared to come from the congressman's office. At least, that's what caller ID said. "People thought we were making the calls," Murphy said. The calls, which the Pennsylvania Republican estimated in the thousands, were apparently placed with fake caller ID.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2006 | Jan Stuart, Newsday
The fabulous Modernist house that is the unbilled star of "When a Stranger Calls" is supposed to be in Colorado, but only someone who has attended lots of jet-set movie industry parties in Los Angeles could cook it up. Nothing in this droopy remake of the 1979 thriller starring Carol Kane could possibly be as frightening as the Windex bill for those two-story picture windows, not to mention the ones that surround the indoor arboretum and fish pond.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1990 | S.J. DIAMOND
At first, the flap over Caller ID, which reveals a caller's number to the party telephoned, seems just a disagreement about the value of a minor new phone device. But it may be the opening salvo in a battle over the nature of today's phone companies. Because the service guards the privacy of the person called while destroying the caller's privacy, Caller ID will immediately affect even those who don't subscribe. It may also cost them several billion dollars a year to regain their privacy.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1990 | S.J. DIAMOND
On first impression, it's just another little techie device from a phone system desperate to leave simple communications behind and enter the lucrative "information age." Known as Caller ID in the residential market and Automatic Number Identification (ANI) to big telemarketers with 800 and 900 numbers, it displays the number of a caller as the call is coming in.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2004 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates said Tuesday that the company was implementing a system akin to caller ID for e-mail to stem the flood of spam pitching blind dates and discounted medications. The system aims to weed out e-mails that falsify their point of origin, a trick used by spammers to fool recipients into accepting their messages by making them look like they come from a reputable source.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2004 | From Reuters
Telemarketers will be required to transmit their phone numbers and other caller-ID information to the phones of the people being called under rules that took effect Thursday. The regulation should make it easier for consumers with caller-ID equipment to screen out unwanted telephone sales calls and report marketers that are ignoring requests to be left alone, the Federal Trade Commission said.
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