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Calories

HEALTH
February 22, 2010 | Jeannine Stein
Americans are eating out more and more: According to the National Restaurant Assn., 49% of every food dollar in the U.S. is now spent in restaurants, up from 25% in 1955. What that means is we have less and less control over just what goes into our food — and the numbers, now available per California law, are sometimes shocking. Even healthful-seeming selections can pack a calorie-, fat-, salt- or sugar-laden punch. Salads, long touted as a virtuous choice, are a prime example.
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FOOD
June 9, 1994 | BRUCE HENSTELL
When running a mile, a 132-pound woman will burn between 90 to 95 calories but a 175-pound man will drop 125 calories. The reason seems to be evolution. In the dim mists of pre-history, food was hard to come by and every calorie had to be conserved--particularly if a woman was to conceive and bear a child; a successful pregnancy requires about 80,000 calories. So women should keep exercising, but if they want to lose weight, calorie-counting is still the way to go.
HEALTH
June 9, 2008 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
MOST people who maintain a substantial weight loss work to keep their calories low -- between 1,200 and 1,700 a day for women, and 1,800 to 2,200 for men (depending on factors such as metabolism and amounts of exercise). That's far fewer calories than the amount consumed by most people who have never lost a great deal of weight. So what does a 1,600-calorie diet look like compared with what can be a typical day's worth of food?
HEALTH
May 10, 2004
Your April 26 article "Snack Machines Try to Shake Junk-Food Image" reports on an interesting marketing gimmick (manufacturers' response to the public's perception that unhealthy vending machine snacks are contributing to obesity), but fails to consider how that response might, in fact, affect the problem of rising obesity rates that it purports to address. First, with the exception of yogurt and fresh fruit, nearly all the foods mentioned as examples of healthy substitutes for the traditional candy/salty snack offerings provide as many calories as, if not more calories than, the traditional choices, while contributing relatively little in the way of needed vitamins, minerals or fiber.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For the second time in less than a year, researchers have pinpointed a genetic flaw that makes people fat. Three international teams of researchers reported Thursday that they have identified a common defect in a gene that regulates how fast the body burns calories. Those with the bad gene tend to grow potbellies and develop diabetes earlier in adulthood.
FOOD
July 23, 1987 | TONI TIPTON
During the summer lots of space in newspaper food pages is devoted the food of the season--salads. They are lauded for their ease of preparation. They free the cook for activities out of doors, and a hot stove is not required in most cases. Whether fruit, vegetables, rice, poultry, meat or fish is chosen as the main ingredient, a salad is a healthful foundation upon which to build a menu.
FOOD
June 30, 1985
Savvy Americans are eating lighter. They know they can still enjoy their traditional favorites and cut down on calories and fat, and holidays are no exception. Offered here is a slimmed down July 4th picnic. It features a tasty version of coleslaw made with a dressing of grapefruit juice, oil, mustard and caraway seeds. A cup of regular slaw with a mayonnaise dressing has about 175 calories; our version boasts a slim 100. A quarter of a three-pound fried chicken carries a 968-calorie tag.
NEWS
June 1, 2010 | Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Hold on to your stomachs—the Center for Science in the Public Interest has come out with its Xtreme Eating awards, giving dubious honors to restaurant fare that maxes out on fat and calories. Among the winners (or should that be losers?) is the pasta carbonara at Cheesecake Factory; when served with chicken this dish comes in at 2,500 calories and 85 grams of saturated fat. Also on the list is the New Zealand rack of lamb at Outback Steakhouse. The lamb alone (no sides) is 1,300 calories and 60 grams of saturated fat, plus 1,340 milligrams of sodium (recommended daily allowance of sodium is from 2,400 milligrams for a healthy adult, although some health experts think it should be far lower)
HEALTH
September 28, 2009 | Judy Foreman, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
As a nation, we are obviously getting fatter and fatter. Not only are we ever more confused about how to lose weight, we're particularly fuzzy on the question of how big a role exercise plays and whether we just have to count calories. So, here's the deal. Yes, you can count calories or weigh yourself every day. If your weight is up today compared with yesterday, you ate more calories than you burned. If it's less, you burned more than you ate -- provided you didn't drink gallons of liquid the day before, which could throw the scale off. It comes down to simple arithmetic, and you've heard it before: Calories in, calories out. You will absolutely, inevitably, sadly, this-could-not-be-clearer gain weight if you eat more calories than you expend in basic metabolism -- breathing, digesting, sleeping, etc. -- plus whatever else you do, such as chasing the kids, walking, vacuuming or going to the gym. But most of us can't, or won't, do the math, probably because it's so depressing.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Earlier this week, researchers reported that skipping breakfast was linked to heart disease. A few days later comes word that skipping breakfast could be a good weight-loss strategy because people don't make up for all those calories later in the day. Should we tear our hair out in frustration? Or cozy up to the scrambled eggs? “I'm very concerned about that. We in nutrition seem to put out contradictory diet messages,” said David Levitsky, a Cornell professor of nutritional sciences and psychology and the senior author of the breakfast and calories study.
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