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Calvin Peete

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April 2, 1985 | Associated Press
Calvin Peete turned his life around on the pro golf tour. "If it hadn't been for golf, I'd probably still be peddling jewelry or be in the sugar mills somewhere," he said. As it is, he's a respected, highly successful practitioner of a sport for which he has two handicaps, his color and his left arm. Peete is black. And there have been only a few black players--Charlie Sifford and Lee Elder are the most prominent--who have made a success of professional tournament golf.
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SPORTS
March 12, 1998 | J.A. ADANDE
For African-American kids growing up in the 1980s, there was no shortage of heroes in football and basketball. When we were on the playground, we never wanted to be ourselves. We were Lynn Swann or Tony Dorsett or Herschel Walker on the football field, Magic Johnson or Dr. J or Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on the basketball court. Golf? Not even an option. The closest I came to playing as a kid was miniature golf.
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SPORTS
April 11, 1985 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Approaching the first tee for a practice round Wednesday at Augusta National, Calvin Peete was interrupted almost every other step by autograph seekers. Finally, he gave up and was quickly surrounded. Observing the scene from a distance was a group of middle-aged golf fans. "You never would have seen that 10 years ago," one of them said, alluding to the popularity of a black golfer in a Southern society setting. He was probably right.
SPORTS
April 14, 1995 | From Associated Press
Calvin Peete took advantage of a fast start Thursday to shoot a four-under-par 68 for a share of the first-round lead in the PGA Seniors Championship at Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Peete was four under after eight holes and at day's end was tied with Harry Toscano and DeWitt Weaver. Weaver birdied five of his first seven holes but was one over on the closing nine on the Champions course at the PGA Resort. "Those last nine holes are hard," Weaver said. "They're intimidating. Every one of them."
SPORTS
January 23, 1985 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Calvin Peete doesn't expect much from himself this week in the Los Angeles Open, which may serve as a word of warning for the rest of the touring professionals at Riviera. He didn't expect much last week at Phoenix, either, but he wound up winning $81,000 after playing four rounds of golf at 14 strokes under par--despite a painful eye irritation that nearly caused him to withdraw Saturday. "I normally never play this well so early in the year, so winning at Phoenix was a little unexpected."
SPORTS
April 12, 1985 | Scott Ostler
The uniformed law officer guarding the door to the dining room at Augusta National held out a hand when Calvin Peete reached the entrance. Only a Northerner who gained much of his insight into Southern law enforcement from such 1960s movies as "Easy Rider" and "Heat of the Night" could appreciate the potential for confrontation here between the white cop and the black golfer. "Cal," said the officer, extending paper and pen, "could you sign this?" Peete smiled and signed his autograph.
SPORTS
April 12, 1986
As an avid reader of the Los Angeles Times for many years and a devoted golf player, I look forward to reading your description of the golf tournaments and the winners on Mondays. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that winning and doing it the hard way is not enough. What, short of a new paint job, does Calvin Peete have to accomplish to get the same coverage in The Times (picture and several page coverage) as the senior citizens, South Africans, Germans, Australians and white would-be or has-been winners who have not compiled a record that can remotely be compared to Peete's?
SPORTS
April 6, 1986 | United Press International
Never you mind that Calvin Peete is 42, going on 43. The way he sees it, he's still just a youngster on the pro golf tour. "Sure, I'm 42, but I feel a young 42," says Peete. "I've been playing competitive golf for only about 13 years so the fire's still burning. I figure I've still got five or six good years left in my game."
SPORTS
April 14, 1995 | From Associated Press
Calvin Peete took advantage of a fast start Thursday to shoot a four-under-par 68 for a share of the first-round lead in the PGA Seniors Championship at Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Peete was four under after eight holes and at day's end was tied with Harry Toscano and DeWitt Weaver. Weaver birdied five of his first seven holes but was one over on the closing nine on the Champions course at the PGA Resort. "Those last nine holes are hard," Weaver said. "They're intimidating. Every one of them."
SPORTS
April 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Calvin Peete, who struggled with back problems the past three years, shot a five-under-par 66 Friday to tie Steve Pate for the second-round lead in the Heritage tournament at Hilton Head Island, S.C. Peete and Pate were tied at six-under-par 136 after two rounds at the Harbour Town Golf Links. Pate led until bogeying two of the last five holes. Peete, 46, had the best round of the day on the 6,657-yard course, making six birdies and suffering a lone bogey on the par-three, 180-yard seventh hole.
SPORTS
August 12, 1990 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he was 2, Frederick Chew III was given a set of miniature golf clubs and plastic balls. The back yard became his driving range, the living room rug his putting green. Chew, a small, delicate child, whacked each ball until it was lost. That done, he started hitting marbles. When he was 5, Chew, using a set of mix-and-match clubs bought at the local Goodwill for $3 and cut down at a hardware store, finished last in his first tournament.
SPORTS
April 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Calvin Peete, who struggled with back problems the past three years, shot a five-under-par 66 Friday to tie Steve Pate for the second-round lead in the Heritage tournament at Hilton Head Island, S.C. Peete and Pate were tied at six-under-par 136 after two rounds at the Harbour Town Golf Links. Pate led until bogeying two of the last five holes. Peete, 46, had the best round of the day on the 6,657-yard course, making six birdies and suffering a lone bogey on the par-three, 180-yard seventh hole.
SPORTS
May 11, 1988 | MARYANN HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
Mention the name Rodney Peete, and you think touchdowns, not home runs. But playing third base for USC isn't just a springtime hobby for the Trojan quarterback. Though his .339 batting average won't help him in football, it could land him a job as a professional baseball player. "I don't think people realize Rodney is a legitimate major league prospect," USC baseball Coach Mike Gillespie said. "People lose track of that fact, because of football.
SPORTS
April 10, 1987 | MIKE DOWNEY
"Yes, I did have negative feelings about the Masters," said Calvin Peete. "To me, it was just another golf tournament. "But now I feel like I'm not just out here . . . " He hesitated and measured his words. " . . . in the way," he said. Peete felt more at home at the Masters, particularly after Thursday's one-under-par 71 had put him among the first-day leaders, two shots off the pace. "The tradition is sort of rubbing off on me," he said in the Augusta National clubhouse afterward.
SPORTS
April 28, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Curtis Strange, who started the final round of the $500,000 Houston Open three strokes behind, shot a 66 to force a sudden-death playoff with Calvin Peete, then sank a 20-foot putt on the third extra hole to win the $90,000 first prize Sunday at The Woodlands, Tex. After Strange made his putt, Peete, who led or shared the lead through all four rounds, missed a 20-footer that would have forced a fourth extra hole. Peete, who had a final-round 69, lost a playoff for the first time in his career.
SPORTS
April 26, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Calvin Peete shot a two-under-par 70 Friday to take sole possession of first place in the $500,000 Houston Open with a 135 total. Wayne Grady, who shared the lead with Peete after Thursday's first round, was tied for second with Nick Faldo and Tom Watson, two strokes behind the leader. At 138 were Mike Sullivan, who shot a course-record 63 Friday, and Jay Haas. They were one stroke ahead of Craig Stadler, Mike Hulbert and Loren Roberts.
SPORTS
April 1, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Calvin Peete figured a moderately good final round would enable him to capture the $900,000 Tournament Players Championship, but D.A. Weibring forced him to exceed his expectations. Peete added luster Sunday to his reputation as one of the best players on the PGA Tour by winning the prestigious tournament by three shots--but he had to shoot a 6-under-par 66 to accomplish that.
SPORTS
April 10, 1987 | MIKE DOWNEY
"Yes, I did have negative feelings about the Masters," said Calvin Peete. "To me, it was just another golf tournament. "But now I feel like I'm not just out here . . . " He hesitated and measured his words. " . . . in the way," he said. Peete felt more at home at the Masters, particularly after Thursday's one-under-par 71 had put him among the first-day leaders, two shots off the pace. "The tradition is sort of rubbing off on me," he said in the Augusta National clubhouse afterward.
SPORTS
April 25, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Wayne Grady of Australia birdied six of the final nine holes Thursday in the first round of the $500,000 Houston Open to finish in a tie for the lead with Calvin Peete at seven-under-par 65. Grady and Peete bettered the course record of 66 shot by Payne Stewart in last year's tournament on the 7,042-yard TPC course at The Woodlands, Tex. Grady had 10 birdies and held a one-shot lead over Peete going to the final hole. But Grady three-putted from 35 feet for a bogey.
SPORTS
April 12, 1986
As an avid reader of the Los Angeles Times for many years and a devoted golf player, I look forward to reading your description of the golf tournaments and the winners on Mondays. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that winning and doing it the hard way is not enough. What, short of a new paint job, does Calvin Peete have to accomplish to get the same coverage in The Times (picture and several page coverage) as the senior citizens, South Africans, Germans, Australians and white would-be or has-been winners who have not compiled a record that can remotely be compared to Peete's?
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