Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCalvin Trillin
IN THE NEWS

Calvin Trillin

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week Nov. 25 - Dec. 1 in PDF format This week's TV Movies   CBS This Morning (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Paul Rudd; Rod Stewart performs; chef Rui Correia; Ed Burns. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Chefs Marcus Samuelsson and Tim Love; a performance from “Elf.” (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Kelly and Michael Patricia Heaton; Scott Speedman. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Jim Belushi; Marc Summers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Once upong a time, before A&E had grown into the network that brings us "Hoarders" and "Storage Wars," it was a highbrow cable channel. A&E stood for "arts and entertainment" and showed things like operas and symphonies. In its most nascent form, it was Alpha Repertory Television Service, or ARTS. An evening of ARTS programming in 1981 included "an organ recital from Notre Dame Cathedral; an essay on the painter Edouard Manet; a ballet tribute to the sculptor Alexander Calder; a profile of Ernest Hemingway, narrated by Anthony Burgess, and a short film starring the mime Marcel Marceau.
Advertisement
BOOKS
April 10, 1994
I'm at my desk--not waiting for a muse But for the Times, the Post, The Daily News. For deadline poets, muses are much rarer Than tuning in MacNeil and his friend Lehrer. It's they who, perched like ravens on my sill, Deposit grist that's needed for my mill. I'm stuck. I'm blank. The dreaded deadline looms. I feel my brain is suited for legumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week Nov. 25 - Dec. 1 in PDF format This week's TV Movies   CBS This Morning (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Paul Rudd; Rod Stewart performs; chef Rui Correia; Ed Burns. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Chefs Marcus Samuelsson and Tim Love; a performance from “Elf.” (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Kelly and Michael Patricia Heaton; Scott Speedman. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Jim Belushi; Marc Summers.
BOOKS
November 11, 1990 | Charles Solomon
In these warmly funny recollections of places visited and meals eaten, Calvin Trillin contrasts European attitudes regarding travel with the American predilection for speed ("Americans drive across the country as if someone's chasing them"). But Trillin prefers good food--especially good French and Italian food--to scenic vistas, and he goes to great lengths to find it.
BOOKS
April 4, 1993 | RICHARD EDER
At the 1991 memorial service in the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies, some were there for the professor they knew as Roger D. Hansen. Others were there for the man they knew as Denny. The Roger people--Hansen's colleagues--recalled a tense, solitary figure who suffered from back pain, was prickly and intransigent, and had published a good book on economic development 20 years earlier but no longer wrote much.
NEWS
February 11, 2002 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's 11:30 a.m. and Calvin Trillin slides into a booth at the Fog City Diner and orders scotch and water. The waitress asks what kind of scotch he would like. "Any rotgut," he replies, before launching into a typical self-deprecating spiel. "People switched to white wine," he says. "I stuck with scotch. People switched to marijuana. I stuck with scotch. People switched to Perrier. I stuck with scotch. So now people can point to me sodden in the corner and say, 'There's a man of character.'
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2011 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
Trillin on Texas Calvin Trillin University of Texas Press: 184 pp, $22 Calvin Trillin is a man of principle. He can't stand, for instance, people who talk about themselves in the third person, which made things difficult back in the days of Dole and Dukakis. He once declared that people caught trying to sell macramé should be, themselves, "dyed a natural color. " And of writers, he once said: "There is no progress" — no corporate world to fall back on, no middle management.
NEWS
September 6, 2001
Calvin Trillin's writing is by turns insightful, warm and funny, no matter what mode it takes--journalism, novel, commentary, verse, monologue, biography or autobiography. A staff writer for the New Yorker since 1963, Trillin spent 15 of those years writing U.S. Journal, a series of stories that appeared from around the country.
BOOKS
June 16, 1996 | Marion Winik, Marion Winik is the author of "First Comes Love" (Pantheon) and a commentator for National Public Radio
My favorite lines in "Tessie and Pearlie" come from near the end of the book. "Beyond love and family, which must inevitably die," writes author and world-class granddaughter Joy Horowitz, "I now understand that there is only one thing that lasts: duty. It is a duty to go on, to observe our humanness in the face of suffering. And in this ordinary purpose, extraordinary things can happen."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2011
EVENTS Kern County Fair This old-fashioned fair kicks off 12 days of shows, contests, carnival rides, auctions and children's activities. The petting zoo is back by popular demand, and new attractions include a blacksmith show, Wool Riders, Eurobobbies and the Kinect/Xbox Mobile Tour. Through Oct. 2. Kern County Fairgrounds, 1142 S. P St., Bakersfield. 3-10 p.m. $8. (661) 833-4900; http://www.kerncountyfair.com. BOOKS Calvin Trillin with Kevin Nealon Not many writers have as much range of tone as Trillin.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2011 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
Trillin on Texas Calvin Trillin University of Texas Press: 184 pp, $22 Calvin Trillin is a man of principle. He can't stand, for instance, people who talk about themselves in the third person, which made things difficult back in the days of Dole and Dukakis. He once declared that people caught trying to sell macramé should be, themselves, "dyed a natural color. " And of writers, he once said: "There is no progress" — no corporate world to fall back on, no middle management.
BOOKS
December 31, 2006 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch is the author of, most recently, "A History of the End of the World: How the Most Controversial Book in the Bible Changed the Course of Western Civilization."
WHEN Alice Trillin died in 2001, the headline over the obituary in the New York Times identified her as "Educator, Author and Muse." Of the three roles, she is best known for the last one -- Alice was the inspiration for the work of author, columnist and veteran New Yorker contributor Calvin Trillin. "When I wrote in the dedication of a book 'For Alice,' I meant it literally," he affirms in "About Alice," which is a kind of belated obit of his own.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2006 | Deborah Netburn
What the literary folks will be talking about: "About Alice." The newest book from prolific New Yorker writer Calvin Trillin is a tribute to his late wife, Alice, whom the author frequently portrayed in his many essays. A book editor here describes it as "lovely and devastating." (Tuesday) What everyone's already been talking about: "Dreamgirls." L.A.
BOOKS
January 8, 2006 | David Freeman, David Freeman is a screenwriter and novelist. His most recent book is "It's All True."
JOHN GREGORY DUNNE, a modern man of letters, managed careers as a novelist, reporter, essayist and screenwriter. If there's poetry in his trunk or the odd translation from Middle German, it's not mentioned. Dunne, who died in December of 2003, was born in Hartford, Conn., in 1932 into the Irish American upper-middle class, the son of a surgeon. He was raised in the Catholic Church (though later lapsed) and educated at Portsmouth Priory and Princeton (class of 1954).
NEWS
February 11, 2002 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's 11:30 a.m. and Calvin Trillin slides into a booth at the Fog City Diner and orders scotch and water. The waitress asks what kind of scotch he would like. "Any rotgut," he replies, before launching into a typical self-deprecating spiel. "People switched to white wine," he says. "I stuck with scotch. People switched to marijuana. I stuck with scotch. People switched to Perrier. I stuck with scotch. So now people can point to me sodden in the corner and say, 'There's a man of character.'
BOOKS
February 10, 2002 | BRIGITTE FRASE
"Not to boast," Calvin Trillin told Book magazine last summer about his newest book, "Tepper Isn't Going Out," "but I think this is the first parking novel." I would add that it is unlikely to be superseded any time soon.
NEWS
September 6, 2001
Calvin Trillin's writing is by turns insightful, warm and funny, no matter what mode it takes--journalism, novel, commentary, verse, monologue, biography or autobiography. A staff writer for the New Yorker since 1963, Trillin spent 15 of those years writing U.S. Journal, a series of stories that appeared from around the country.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|