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Cam Ranh Bay

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NEWS
January 19, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Soviet Union announced it has withdrawn some of its military aircraft from the Cam Ranh Bay base in Vietnam as part of overall defense cuts. Foreign Ministry spokesman Vadim Perfilyev told a news briefing in Moscow that MIG-23 fighters and TU-16 bombers were pulled out of Cam Ranh Bay.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1991
If we are determined to maintain a military base in the region, one place welcoming such a military base and probably offering cheaper rent is Cam Ranh Bay--a former U.S. military base before 1973. Such a presence will help one of the poorest nations in the world--Vietnam. This would solve the two goals that failed during the Vietnam War: promoting a free-market economic and a political change in this Stalin model regime. The U.S. should go where the people need us and whose government welcomes us. DOAN VAN TOAI The Institute for Democracy in Vietnam Washington
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NEWS
March 1, 1987 | From Reuters
The Soviet base at Cam Ranh Bay in southern Vietnam would not last more than a day if war broke out between the United States and the Soviet Union, Australian Defense Minister Kim Beazley said Friday. Beazley made the statement in Parliament after several opposition and government members expressed concern over the growing Soviet presence in the Pacific and in the bay. "The Soviet Union does not deploy front-line craft in Cam Ranh Bay.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A delegation from the U.S. Congress was refused permission to visit a former U.S. military base now used by the Soviet Union at Cam Ranh Bay in southern Vietnam, delegation leader Rep. Patricia Schroeder (D-Colo.) said here today. Schroeder, whose delegation is assessing possible sites for U.S. bases in Asia, met here with Foreign Minister Nguyen Co Thach for talks that centered on the Soviet presence in Vietnam and the situation in Cambodia.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A delegation from the U.S. Congress was refused permission to visit a former U.S. military base now used by the Soviet Union at Cam Ranh Bay in southern Vietnam, delegation leader Rep. Patricia Schroeder (D-Colo.) said here today. Schroeder, whose delegation is assessing possible sites for U.S. bases in Asia, met here with Foreign Minister Nguyen Co Thach for talks that centered on the Soviet presence in Vietnam and the situation in Cambodia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1990 | NAYAN CHANDA, Nayan Chanda, on leave from the Far Eastern Economic Review, is a senior associate of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. and
A delegation from the House Arms Services Committee has set out for Southeast Asia to look at the alternatives for the bases in the Philippines. Among their destinations is an unusual place--Hanoi. Will the Americans return to Cam Ranh Bay, the naval base they built and left to be taken over by the Soviets? The question may not be as absurd as it sounds.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | Associated Press
Vietnamese officials privately suggested allowing the U.S. military to return to Cam Ranh Bay if relations between the countries continue to warm, says a congressman who recently met with them. Rep. Tom Ridge (R-Pa.) said the extraordinary possibility was raised at a forum in Bali, Indonesia, attended by several congressmen and a group of top-ranking officials of Vietnam's Communist regime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1991
If we are determined to maintain a military base in the region, one place welcoming such a military base and probably offering cheaper rent is Cam Ranh Bay--a former U.S. military base before 1973. Such a presence will help one of the poorest nations in the world--Vietnam. This would solve the two goals that failed during the Vietnam War: promoting a free-market economic and a political change in this Stalin model regime. The U.S. should go where the people need us and whose government welcomes us. DOAN VAN TOAI The Institute for Democracy in Vietnam Washington
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1988
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev's offer to eliminate the military installation in Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam, if the United States agrees to dismantle the U.S. bases it operates in the Philippines is a step in a positive direction in shaping a neutral future for Southeast Asia (Part I, Sept. 17). The world economy is shifting towards the region, and a continued military buildup in the area will only increase the tensions which abound there and around the world. The U.S. government should view this offer as an extension of the "historic arms agreement" of 1987.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1986
David Lamb's article (Nov. 23), "Vietnam Correspondents Gather for Reunion," reveals quite a lot about the slants and misperceptions of those who reported on the war. The failures of some reporters to understand what was at stake is illustrated by a quote attributed to former New York Times reporter Gloria Emerson: ". . . And I look back and I wonder, if indeed we had won the war, what is it exactly that we would have won?" Surely it is time for reporter Emerson to look at some of the evidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1990 | NAYAN CHANDA, Nayan Chanda, on leave from the Far Eastern Economic Review, is a senior associate of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. and
A delegation from the House Arms Services Committee has set out for Southeast Asia to look at the alternatives for the bases in the Philippines. Among their destinations is an unusual place--Hanoi. Will the Americans return to Cam Ranh Bay, the naval base they built and left to be taken over by the Soviets? The question may not be as absurd as it sounds.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | Associated Press
Vietnamese officials privately suggested allowing the U.S. military to return to Cam Ranh Bay if relations between the countries continue to warm, says a congressman who recently met with them. Rep. Tom Ridge (R-Pa.) said the extraordinary possibility was raised at a forum in Bali, Indonesia, attended by several congressmen and a group of top-ranking officials of Vietnam's Communist regime.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Soviet Union announced it has withdrawn some of its military aircraft from the Cam Ranh Bay base in Vietnam as part of overall defense cuts. Foreign Ministry spokesman Vadim Perfilyev told a news briefing in Moscow that MIG-23 fighters and TU-16 bombers were pulled out of Cam Ranh Bay.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union held out the prospect today of a unilateral pullout from Vietnam's Cam Ranh Bay, dropping demands for a matching U.S. withdrawal from Subic and Clark bases in the Philippines. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, on a 24-hour visit to Manila, also pledged that Moscow would not provide support for communist insurgents in the Philippines and announced the setting up of a committee to boost bilateral trade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1988
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev's offer to eliminate the military installation in Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam, if the United States agrees to dismantle the U.S. bases it operates in the Philippines is a step in a positive direction in shaping a neutral future for Southeast Asia (Part I, Sept. 17). The world economy is shifting towards the region, and a continued military buildup in the area will only increase the tensions which abound there and around the world. The U.S. government should view this offer as an extension of the "historic arms agreement" of 1987.
NEWS
September 17, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev announced Friday that the Soviet Union will give up a key naval base in Vietnam if the United States will withdraw from its bases in the Philippines. Gorbachev also proposed that a controversial Siberian radar station be turned into a jointly operated Soviet-American space center in an effort to meet U.S. demands that the facility be dismantled under terms of the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty.
NEWS
September 17, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev announced Friday that the Soviet Union will give up a key naval base in Vietnam if the United States will withdraw from its bases in the Philippines. Gorbachev also proposed that a controversial Siberian radar station be turned into a jointly operated Soviet-American space center in an effort to meet U.S. demands that the facility be dismantled under terms of the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty.
NEWS
March 1, 1987 | From Reuters
The Soviet base at Cam Ranh Bay in southern Vietnam would not last more than a day if war broke out between the United States and the Soviet Union, Australian Defense Minister Kim Beazley said Friday. Beazley made the statement in Parliament after several opposition and government members expressed concern over the growing Soviet presence in the Pacific and in the bay. "The Soviet Union does not deploy front-line craft in Cam Ranh Bay.
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