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Cambodia Elections

NEWS
June 16, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will Por Bun Sroeu please come back to Cambodia? Bun Sroeu was one of 120 candidates who won a parliamentary seat during Cambodia's national elections, held in the last week of May. He was on the ballot for the opposition royalist party known as FUNCINPEC in the province of Kompong Cham. But before the results were published, Bun Sroeu returned to Southern California, where friends said he has spent the past several years living in Long Beach. Now FUNCINPEC wants him to come back.
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NEWS
June 11, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations on Thursday officially declared the opposition royalist party the winner of Cambodia's national elections, but the Phnom Penh regime said it still could not accept the results.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | From Reuters
The chief U.N. peacekeeper in Cambodia declared the results of the country's elections fair Wednesday and rejected demands by the defeated government party for an independent inquiry into alleged fraud. "Having . . . already certified the polling as free and fair, I am in a position to certify and declare the results of these elections as fair and acceptable," Yasushi Akashi said in a letter to the government party. Akashi's verdict on last month's U.N.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Khmer Rouge said it will renew fighting if the Phnom Penh government does not yield power to the winner of Cambodia's general elections. At its first news conference since the May 23-28 U.N.-organized elections, the guerrilla group hinted that it would support the opposition party headed by Prince Norodom Ranariddh, which won the vote. However, it did not directly endorse the outcome of the elections, which it boycotted.
NEWS
June 5, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cambodian politics, full of blood and treachery, have always seemed reminiscent of a Shakespearean tragedy. But Friday, the collapse of efforts to form a coalition government was more suggestive of a television soap opera rich in family psychodrama.
NEWS
June 4, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts to resolve Cambodia's decades of political bickering appeared to have stumbled badly today when Prince Norodom Sihanouk, the man chosen to lead a new, national unity government, announced that the plan had collapsed. Sihanouk, 72, said Thursday that he had agreed to serve as chief of state, prime minister and commander in chief of the armed forces.
NEWS
June 1, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pall of uncertainty clouded Cambodia's national elections Monday when the ruling party asked the United Nations to suspend announcement of results because of what it called "irregularities" in the voting. But the United Nations, which conducted the six-day elections last week, rejected the call and published new figures that showed the Phnom Penh administration in a neck-and-neck race with the opposition royalist party. According to the figures, U.N. officials had counted 1.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early returns in Cambodia's first free elections in decades today indicated that the Phnom Penh government and the opposition royalist party were running virtually neck and neck. A United Nations spokesman released figures from the six days of voting for 10 of the country's 21 provinces based on early partial returns. The Phnom Penh regime had won 41.1% of the overall vote, while the royalist party known as FUNCINPEC had 40.1%.
NEWS
May 29, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polls closed Friday after a dramatically heavy turnout in six days of voting for a new Cambodian government, with the United Nations warning that it expects all the parties to honor a promise to accept the results. A U.N. spokesman said that about 90% of the country's 4.6 million registered voters had gone to the polls since voting started Sunday. Vote counting will start today and is expected to be finished next week.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, Cambodia's nominal head of state, said Wednesday that he is abandoning plans to include the Khmer Rouge guerrilla faction in a government of national unity. Sihanouk's statement reflected the sharply declining fortunes of the Maoist rebels after their failure to live up to reported threats to disrupt this week's Cambodian national elections. The elections, six days of U.N.
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