Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCambodia Foreign Aid
IN THE NEWS

Cambodia Foreign Aid

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives of 19 nations, including the United States, signed an international peace agreement on Wednesday, ending 21 years of conflict in Cambodia and placing the Southeast Asian country under U.N. administration until general elections can be held in 1993. The assignment, with a cost estimated at $2 billion, is the biggest, most expensive ever for the United Nations. Under the agreement, U.N.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Hun Sen said that damage from Cambodia's worst flooding in history has reached $79 million, and he appealed again for international aid. The prime minister said that 2.7 million people were affected and that 1.3 million of those were in urgent need of food, housing and medicine. In all, 252 people have died in the flooding, he said.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 12, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friday was a day of reckoning for Sebastian Marot. The 32-year-old Frenchman, who feeds 500 Cambodian street children each day, has been informed that the Australian aid agency that funds his program is freezing aid to this beleaguered country in the wake of last weekend's coup. Unless other donors rally to the rescue, Marot said, his money will run out within three months. Other aid groups were also reeling Friday after the U.S.
NEWS
July 12, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friday was a day of reckoning for Sebastian Marot. The 32-year-old Frenchman, who feeds 500 Cambodian street children each day, has been informed that the Australian aid agency that funds his program is freezing aid to this beleaguered country in the wake of last weekend's coup. Unless other donors rally to the rescue, Marot said, his money will run out within three months. Other aid groups were also reeling Friday after the U.S.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a massive response to the agony of Cambodia, international donors Monday pledged more than $880 million to rebuild the ravaged nation but made it clear that aid will hinge on strict adherence to the United Nations peace process. The sum pledged by 26 nations and six organizations at an international conference here dwarfed the $595 million requested by the United Nations in May for Cambodia's immediate needs, such as refugee repatriation, infrastructure repair and education and training.
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Hun Sen said that damage from Cambodia's worst flooding in history has reached $79 million, and he appealed again for international aid. The prime minister said that 2.7 million people were affected and that 1.3 million of those were in urgent need of food, housing and medicine. In all, 252 people have died in the flooding, he said.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite his often defiant public words, Cambodian strongman Hun Sen is showing signs of flexibility on key principles required for a settlement of the Cambodian crisis, the U.S. special envoy to Cambodia told Secretary of State Madeleine Albright here Saturday. The apparent softening in the Cambodian leader's stance has triggered the first tentative optimism among U.S.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a massive response to the agony of Cambodia, international donors Monday pledged more than $880 million to rebuild the ravaged nation but made it clear that aid will hinge on strict adherence to the United Nations peace process. The sum pledged by 26 nations and six organizations at an international conference here dwarfed the $595 million requested by the United Nations in May for Cambodia's immediate needs, such as refugee repatriation, infrastructure repair and education and training.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives of 19 nations, including the United States, signed an international peace agreement on Wednesday, ending 21 years of conflict in Cambodia and placing the Southeast Asian country under U.N. administration until general elections can be held in 1993. The assignment, with a cost estimated at $2 billion, is the biggest, most expensive ever for the United Nations. Under the agreement, U.N.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|