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Cambodia Revolts

NEWS
August 20, 1997 | From Reuters
Cambodian government forces said Tuesday that they have seized the last town held by loyalists of ousted First Prime Minister Prince Norodom Ranariddh, but the prince and his followers disputed the report. Government officials said the town of O'Smach fell Tuesday afternoon and that royalists were retreating from the area. A senior military official said the government forces, under the control of coup leader Hun Sen, seized seven royalist tanks. There was no word on prisoners or casualties.
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NEWS
July 24, 1997 | Reuters
An about-face by strongman Hun Sen on mediation in Cambodia's troubles raised hopes Wednesday of a breakthrough in the crisis sparked by the ouster of the country's royalist co-premier. Last week, Second Prime Minister Hun Sen rejected a proposal for mediation by the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations, or ASEAN. Hun Sen, who ousted First Prime Minister Prince Norodom Ranariddh in a July 6 coup, said foreigners should stay out of Cambodia's business.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright chose former Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) to help deal with the crisis in Cambodia, where Second Prime Minister Hun Sen has taken power by ousting First Prime Minister Norodom Ranariddh. The State Department said Solarz, who once chaired the House East Asia Subcommittee, would hold talks in Japan, China, Thailand and Indonesia before visiting Cambodia. Solarz will report his findings to Albright before she meets with leaders of the Assn.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite his often defiant public words, Cambodian strongman Hun Sen is showing signs of flexibility on key principles required for a settlement of the Cambodian crisis, the U.S. special envoy to Cambodia told Secretary of State Madeleine Albright here Saturday. The apparent softening in the Cambodian leader's stance has triggered the first tentative optimism among U.S.
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Factions loyal to prime ministers Hun Sen and Prince Norodom Ranariddh battled with mortars and rocket launchers near the capital, Phnom Penh, in their second armed clash in two weeks. Rising tensions between the premiers have paralyzed the government and derailed peace talks with Khmer Rouge rebels, who reportedly have captured their longtime leader, Pol Pot. The clash began at a naval base about 20 miles north of the capital.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks after Prince Norodom Ranariddh went from royalty to refugee in a bloody ouster, the bit of Cambodia still under his control can fit into a hotel room. Cambodia's deposed first prime minister has become the crown of a mobile kingdom in exile, a suitcase sovereign, hurtling from country to country pleading for support for a return to power. So far, he has failed to persuade the United Nations, Washington and even his father, King Norodom Sihanouk, to fight for his restoration.
NEWS
July 3, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The four warring factions in Cambodia failed Thursday to settle a dispute that has prompted the notorious Khmer Rouge guerrillas to refuse to implement the key second phase of the U.N.-sponsored peace agreement. At the same time, an advance party of Japanese officials arrived here to discuss the first overseas deployment of Japanese soldiers since the end of World War II. The group included three army officers.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | From Reuters
A meeting of Cambodia's reconciliation council, the body that is supposed to help the United Nations steer the country to a durable peace, foundered Saturday after three of its members failed to attend. "It was awful, tedious," said one independent observer at the meeting who did not want to be identified. "It just went round in circles. There was no agreed agenda. It was quite unstructured. "It was not acrimonious, they just did not make a great deal of headway.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | From Reuters
The Phnom Penh government called Tuesday for a U.N.-brokered disarmament plan in Cambodia to be scrapped so its soldiers can go back in the field to counter attacks by Khmer Rouge guerrillas. "We want the U.N. to declare an official end to Phase 2 of the cease-fire," government spokesman Khieu Khanarith said. "We want troops that have been cantoned to go back to their positions." The second phase of the accord signed last year requires fighters from the four Cambodian factions to enter U.N.
NEWS
April 14, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
The Khmer Rouge guerrillas apparently broke with Cambodia's peace process Tuesday, U.N. officials said, raising fears that months of mounting tensions will reignite civil war. They said that all Khmer Rouge officials in the capital appeared to have left Tuesday and that the group sent a letter of withdrawal to U.N. officials. The officials, who declined to be named, said the letter did not indicate whether the Khmer Rouge was severing all relations with the U.N.
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