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NEWS
April 12, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY and JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writers
The sun, who is the King of the Universe, once visited Earth with his pregnant queen, and she gave birth here to a son, Preas Ko Bot. The adventures of that son--rescuing a royal family from an ogre that intended to eat them, fighting a monkey king, battling the father of the princess he loved--form the plot of a popular Cambodian folk opera performed Saturday in Long Beach.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1997 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The music and dance were Cambodian. The turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy were pure American. But the values--ranging from family to freedom--were universal Saturday as the Cambodian Family outreach organization sponsored its annual Thanksgiving event meant to bridge the gap between two cultures. "We've all had some heritage of seeking freedom and success," said Claudia Lamb, the resource coordinator for the Cambodian Family, a social services agency for immigrants based in Santa Ana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The power of Cambodian dance can hit a Westerner like a thunderbolt. That's what happened to Toni Shapiro when she worked among survivors of the genocidal years of the Pol Pot regime, 1975-79, in a refugee camp in Indonesia. And that's what happened to filmmaker Janet Gardner when she visited Phnom Penh in 1990 as part of the U.S.-Indochina Reconciliation Project delegation.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writers
Tears in her eyes, In Or bitterly recalled the day her husband, then a rebel Cambodian soldier, was reported killed in a fire fight with forces supporting the murderous Khmer Rouge that once ruled that country. Alone with two young children, she made the brave but risky decision to flee. "I wanted to be in a place of peace and freedom--the United States," the slightly built Or, 36, recalled Wednesday.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | KARI RENE HALL
These are not the "killing fields," but Lisa Bohm knows they can be deadly nonetheless. As 1992 dawns along Thailand's border with Cambodia, hundreds of thousands of Cambodians--those who have lived in political limbo since fleeing the murderous Khmer Rouge--are burdened with the horror of the past and now, perhaps more than ever, fear for the future. At last the time has come to return home, after the signing of a peace treaty last October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1986 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Sobs of joy filled a waiting room at Los Angeles International Airport Wednesday as a crippled orphan boy rejoined his family for the first time in a decade, and became one of the first Cambodians allowed into America under a special program. Phidel Hun, 12, who was separated from his family as an infant in the Communist overthrow of Cambodia in 1975, stepped timidly from a Northwest Orient plane into a tumult of television cameras and microphones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2004 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
Ra Pok's mother always told her to never talk to men, never argue with those in authority and never get involved in politics. Pok, 20, did the opposite. At 16, she joined Khmer Girls in Action, an all-female Cambodian organization. The group's goals: preventing unjust deportation of Cambodian immigrants, sponsoring leadership workshops for women and organizing cultural events.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2008 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
The story of how a man named Johnny Rhondo, the self-titled grand master of the Church of the Revelation, came to hold the charter to Long Beach's oldest Cambodian Buddhist temple is a curious one. The Buddhist wat on East 20th Street is the beloved, if dilapidated, nucleus for the nation's largest Cambodian community, co-founded by the late actor Haing S. Ngor and served by monks known to hew closely to ancient tradition.
SCIENCE
August 3, 2005 | Alex Raksin, Times Staff Writer
More than two decades after resettling in the United States, Cambodian refugees still suffer high rates of mental illness related to the civil war in their home country, researchers report in a study published in today's edition of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The study found that the refugees had six times the rate of major depression and 17 times the rate of post-traumatic stress disorder compared with the general population. Most of the 150,000 refugees admitted to the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1996 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Minnie-Standard neighborhood tossed together its Cambodian and Mexican roots Saturday, and the result was pure American. The area's second annual street party drew about 400 people for an afternoon mix of the neighborhood's predominant cultures. It was an only-in-America sort of affair: Cambodians chatted in Spanish, Buddhists mingled with Catholics, and children stirred lemon chicken into their refried beans.
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