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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1997 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The music and dance were Cambodian. The turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy were pure American. But the values--ranging from family to freedom--were universal Saturday as the Cambodian Family outreach organization sponsored its annual Thanksgiving event meant to bridge the gap between two cultures. "We've all had some heritage of seeking freedom and success," said Claudia Lamb, the resource coordinator for the Cambodian Family, a social services agency for immigrants based in Santa Ana.
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NEWS
January 19, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writers
Tears in her eyes, In Or bitterly recalled the day her husband, then a rebel Cambodian soldier, was reported killed in a fire fight with forces supporting the murderous Khmer Rouge that once ruled that country. Alone with two young children, she made the brave but risky decision to flee. "I wanted to be in a place of peace and freedom--the United States," the slightly built Or, 36, recalled Wednesday.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | KARI RENE HALL
These are not the "killing fields," but Lisa Bohm knows they can be deadly nonetheless. As 1992 dawns along Thailand's border with Cambodia, hundreds of thousands of Cambodians--those who have lived in political limbo since fleeing the murderous Khmer Rouge--are burdened with the horror of the past and now, perhaps more than ever, fear for the future. At last the time has come to return home, after the signing of a peace treaty last October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1986 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Sobs of joy filled a waiting room at Los Angeles International Airport Wednesday as a crippled orphan boy rejoined his family for the first time in a decade, and became one of the first Cambodians allowed into America under a special program. Phidel Hun, 12, who was separated from his family as an infant in the Communist overthrow of Cambodia in 1975, stepped timidly from a Northwest Orient plane into a tumult of television cameras and microphones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2004 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
Ra Pok's mother always told her to never talk to men, never argue with those in authority and never get involved in politics. Pok, 20, did the opposite. At 16, she joined Khmer Girls in Action, an all-female Cambodian organization. The group's goals: preventing unjust deportation of Cambodian immigrants, sponsoring leadership workshops for women and organizing cultural events.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1996 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Minnie-Standard neighborhood tossed together its Cambodian and Mexican roots Saturday, and the result was pure American. The area's second annual street party drew about 400 people for an afternoon mix of the neighborhood's predominant cultures. It was an only-in-America sort of affair: Cambodians chatted in Spanish, Buddhists mingled with Catholics, and children stirred lemon chicken into their refried beans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a 17-year-old student in Phnom Penh, Reach Sambath was roused from his classroom and forced to cheer for the Vietnamese army. Other than to wave a miniature Vietnamese flag, Reach was instructed not to move during the hollow tribute to the Communist force that occupied his country for a decade. * But during the spiritless parade in the Cambodian capital, Reach noticed a cadre of people, scrambling around, angling for photographs and talking to anyone they pleased. They were journalists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1997 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chea Sok Lim fled the killing fields of Cambodia only to discover violence in the middle of his new Orange County neighborhood. He vowed to fight it and is now being recognized for his efforts to keep Cambodian youths focused on education and away from gangs and violence. Lim, 40, was one of three people statewide named Tuesday by the California Wellness Foundation to receive its 1997 California Peace Prize, which includes a $25,000 award.
NEWS
February 16, 1999 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Adena Spingarn first volunteered at Cambodian Family, people at the Santa Ana organization that helps immigrants and refugees were puzzled by and wary of the white teenager. They couldn't figure out why someone who lived in a well-to-do area of north Tustin would want to help strangers in a poor neighborhood. A few distrusted her because she was not Cambodian. Yet, since spring 1996, Adena kept showing up every week, first to teach children how to dance, then to speak and read English.
NEWS
December 5, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 17-year-old member of a Cambodian street gang called the Tiny Rascal Gangsters has pleaded guilty in the 1995 murders of five members of a Vietnamese family in San Bernardino. Vinh "Scrappy" Tran, one of five gang members charged in the slayings, pleaded guilty Tuesday to five counts of murder in exchange for a sentence of up to 50 years to life in state prison. If convicted, Tran could have been sentenced to life in prison without parole. Tran and the others are charged with the Aug.
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