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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2005 | Jia-Rui Chong and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
A prominent activist in Southern California's Cambodian community has been indicted on charges that he masterminded a 2000 attack on several Cambodian government buildings. Yasith Chhun, 48, of Long Beach heads the Cambodian Freedom Fighters, a group based in Long Beach that is on the U.S. State Department's list of terrorist organizations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2005 | Jia-Rui Chong and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
Yasith Chhun was hailed in the national media as the "strip mall revolutionary" whose scrappy band of immigrants conspired against Cambodia's Communist government and raised money for their cause from his tax preparation business in Long Beach. But a week after he was charged with masterminding attacks on government buildings in Phnom Penh, documents filed in federal court present a decidedly different view of the 48-year-old man.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a 17-year-old student in Phnom Penh, Reach Sambath was roused from his classroom and forced to cheer for the Vietnamese army. Other than to wave a miniature Vietnamese flag, Reach was instructed not to move during the hollow tribute to the Communist force that occupied his country for a decade. * But during the spiritless parade in the Cambodian capital, Reach noticed a cadre of people, scrambling around, angling for photographs and talking to anyone they pleased. They were journalists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1997 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chea Sok Lim fled the killing fields of Cambodia only to discover violence in the middle of his new Orange County neighborhood. He vowed to fight it and is now being recognized for his efforts to keep Cambodian youths focused on education and away from gangs and violence. Lim, 40, was one of three people statewide named Tuesday by the California Wellness Foundation to receive its 1997 California Peace Prize, which includes a $25,000 award.
NEWS
February 16, 1999 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Adena Spingarn first volunteered at Cambodian Family, people at the Santa Ana organization that helps immigrants and refugees were puzzled by and wary of the white teenager. They couldn't figure out why someone who lived in a well-to-do area of north Tustin would want to help strangers in a poor neighborhood. A few distrusted her because she was not Cambodian. Yet, since spring 1996, Adena kept showing up every week, first to teach children how to dance, then to speak and read English.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2005 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Cambodian Americans gathered at Wat Khmer Temple near downtown Los Angeles on Sunday to celebrate the New Year, kneeling in prayer before a Buddha statue, dancing to a traditional live band and serving fish soup and noodles to the orange-clad monks. On the same day in Long Beach, survivors of the killing fields held a vigil at a local park to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the start of the brutal communist Khmer Rouge regime that took the lives of more than 1 million Cambodians.
OPINION
February 27, 2014 | By Elizabeth Becker
Being nominated for an Oscar is always a big deal, lifting someone's career or a movie's fortunes at the box office. In Cambodia, an Oscar nomination is proving to be a big deal for an entire nation, crystallizing how important reviving the arts has been for a country devastated by decades of war, genocide and corruption. One of the movies nominated for best foreign film this year is "The Missing Picture," by Cambodia's master filmmaker Rithy Panh. His movie tells the story of the unspeakable horrors perpetrated by the Khmer Rouge and its leader, Pol Pot, who turned Cambodia into a mass labor camp.
NEWS
December 5, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 17-year-old member of a Cambodian street gang called the Tiny Rascal Gangsters has pleaded guilty in the 1995 murders of five members of a Vietnamese family in San Bernardino. Vinh "Scrappy" Tran, one of five gang members charged in the slayings, pleaded guilty Tuesday to five counts of murder in exchange for a sentence of up to 50 years to life in state prison. If convicted, Tran could have been sentenced to life in prison without parole. Tran and the others are charged with the Aug.
WORLD
May 21, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
About 2,000 Cambodians marked the annual "Day of Anger" to remember Khmer Rouge victims, reenacting torture and distributing new textbooks about an era still largely ignored by schools and quickly fading from memory. A small number of the radical communist regime's leaders are on trial for war crimes, but popular interest in the reign is limited, especially among the millions of Cambodians born after the fall of the Khmer Rouge and others scrambling to make a living in one of Asia's poorest countries.
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