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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty, according to records and interviews. An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.
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BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
After years of delays, U.S. safety regulators have announced that backup cameras will be required in new U.S. vehicles by May 2018. The move comes just a day before a court of appeals was to hear arguments in a lawsuit brought against the government by safety groups and families of children injured and killed in back-over accidents. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced Monday that "rear-visibility technology" must be standard equipment in all vehicles under 10,000 pounds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
Lawmakers blocked a proposal Tuesday to allow Beverly Hills police officers to use cameras to catch speeders, saying it would put collecting fines above stopping dangerous drivers. State Sen. Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica) had written legislation for a test program in which Beverly Hills officers would hold a camera triggered by a radar gun that would record speeders. Tickets would be mailed to violators. But the Senate Transportation Committee deadlocked 5 to 5 on the bill. Sen. Jenny Oropeza (D-Long Beach)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
In a climactic car-chase scene in the new movie "Need for Speed," a race car barrels into the back of a police SUV, sending the truck flying through the air. To put viewers in the drivers' seats, director Scott Waugh placed cameras inside the SUV so they could feel the sensation of the truck rotating in the air. He positioned cameras on the head of the stunt driver maneuvering the vehicle that collides with the SUV, and in the car driven by Tobey...
SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Scientists have strapped cameras onto free-swimming sharks, capturing a shark's-eye view of their underwater world. The footage from 14 tiger sharks, six Galapagos sharks, five sandbar sharks, five bluntnose sixgill sharks and a prickly shark is the first to be taken of sharks, by sharks in their natural environment. One clip from a camera attached to a male sandbar shark show the pursuit of a female; another shows its wearer's point of view as it meets up with dozens of other sharks in a mixed group - including sandbars, oceanic blacktips and scalloped hammerheads - and swimming together for most of the day. The discoveries, presented last week at the 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting in Honolulu, reveal the complex daily lives of these fierce, sharp-toothed swimmers in their natural environment.  “I was really amazed by all the images we got back,” said lead author Carl Meyer, a marine biologist at the University of Hawaii.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
Cameras installed inside Los Angeles County jails have been a powerful tool in vetting allegations of deputies abusing inmates, according to a watchdog report released Thursday. For years, critics of the Sheriff's Department's jails pushed the department to install cameras in the lockups since independent witnesses are rarely present when deputies use force. In 2011, following an onslaught of inmate abuse allegations, the department began installing hundreds of cameras. The report released by the agency's civilian monitor Thursday found that the footage has helped to exonerate deputies who were falsely accused and build cases against those who break the rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
Since joining the Los Angeles Police Commission last month, Steve Soboroff has been making calls to some of the city's deepest pockets, asking them to pony up the $1 million he says he needs to jump-start an ambitious project: Outfitting LAPD officers with small video cameras that would record their encounters with people. His unorthodox approach to fundraising for the Los Angeles Police Department has paid dividends and got its latest boost Tuesday when the Dodgers and members of the team's ownership group announced a $250,000 donation to the effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010
Paul Greengrass' films are known for kinetic action and lightning-quick editing, and his latest, the Iraq war thriller "Green Zone," is no exception. Greengrass and cinematographer Barry Ackroyd shot the action sequences in long, continuous takes with multiple cameras that had staggered start times, so one camera would be filming while another was reloading. "This allowed the actors to inhabit their environments more fully," explained editor and co-producer Christopher Rouse, who had to then break the raw footage down into categories (coverage of a single character, for instance)
SCIENCE
January 16, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Alligators do their best hunting in the early morning hours, say scientists who tramped out into muddy Florida wetlands and strapped cameras onto the giant reptiles' backs. The findings, published in the journal PLOS One, reveals once-obscure aspects of the lives of the animals by taking the alligator's-eye view. Alligators and crocodiles, known together as crocodilians, are found throughout the southeastern United States. Scientists have studied their hunting and eating habits for years (a recent study even found that these cunning predators may actually use sticks to lure birds to their doom )
OPINION
November 24, 2004
Re "Nurses Find Hidden Cameras at Hospital," Nov. 18: I would like to ask the administrators at the Good Samaritan Hospital if it was their intention to post signs in the nurses break room to inform them they were under surveillance, then why did they feel the need to hide the cameras? GPS in our cars, cameras in our break rooms, what we record on TiVo sold to advertisers: Where will it all end? Maggie Hittinger RN Anaheim
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By David A. Keeps
In "Behind Closed Doors: The Private Homes of 25 of the World's Most Creative People" (Hardie Grant, $29.95), London-based journalist Rob Meyers has assembled the interior-design version of those stars-without-their-makeup slide shows that never fail to fascinate. The book revolves around a simple premise: Meyers sent disposable cameras to dozens of celebrities, designers and fellow journalists with one simple instruction: Whatever else you photograph, you must shoot the inside of your icebox.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Robert Abele
A race-against-time thriller set in a crowded concert hall, director Eugenio Mira's "Grand Piano" may never match the silky suspense of Hitchcock's classic of sinister decorum, "The Man Who Knew Too Much," but it has a certain virtuosic joie de vivre. Elijah Wood stars as a celebrated pianist who, five years after a notorious fiasco of a performance, is making a nervous, much-hyped return to the stage. As he begins to play for the eager audience, however, his score reveals a scrawled note from a hidden sniper (a mostly unseen John Cusack)
SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Scientists have strapped cameras onto free-swimming sharks, capturing a shark's-eye view of their underwater world. The footage from 14 tiger sharks, six Galapagos sharks, five sandbar sharks, five bluntnose sixgill sharks and a prickly shark is the first to be taken of sharks, by sharks in their natural environment. One clip from a camera attached to a male sandbar shark show the pursuit of a female; another shows its wearer's point of view as it meets up with dozens of other sharks in a mixed group - including sandbars, oceanic blacktips and scalloped hammerheads - and swimming together for most of the day. The discoveries, presented last week at the 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting in Honolulu, reveal the complex daily lives of these fierce, sharp-toothed swimmers in their natural environment.  “I was really amazed by all the images we got back,” said lead author Carl Meyer, a marine biologist at the University of Hawaii.
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Surreptitiously recorded videos of Supreme Court proceedings that surfaced on YouTube last week aren't much of a viewing experience. The most revealing video, which captures a few moments from two oral argument sessions, is a jerky affair that makes Abraham Zapruder's amateur footage of the Kennedy assassination look like the work of an auteur. And the justices are bit players: The star of the video is Noah Kai Newkirk, a Los Angeles man who stood up during arguments Wednesday to denounce the court's 2010 Citizens United decision allowing corporations to spend money on politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - The City Council is set to spend $2 million for clip-on cameras for police officers so that officials can monitor the officers' interactions with the public. The move comes amid two high-profile cases of allegations that on-duty officers abused women.  One officer has been charged with two felonies and three misdemeanors and has resigned; a second officer has been suspended and is under investigation, although no charges have yet been filed. The use of video cameras is supported by Mayor-elect Kevin Faulconer, Acting Mayor Todd Gloria, City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer and Ari Bloomekatz
The two 10-month-old mountain lion cubs caught by a remote camera feeding on a mule deer carcass in Malibu Creek State Park last week provided welcome relief to researchers who hadn't seen them since they were just 3 weeks old. Biologist Jeff  Sikich  with the National Park Service called the cubs, designated P-30 and P-28, "nice and fat. " "Mom seems to be finding deer and prey for them," he said. Four years ago, "mom" was hailed by  the Park Service as an unknown mountain lion discovered in the Hidden Valley area of the Santa Monica Mountains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1999
In your March 10 article about cameras at railroad crossings, you stated that a train going 79 miles per hour would take three seconds to travel the length of three football fields. At that speed it would take 7.7 seconds to do it. To travel three football fields in three seconds, the train must be traveling at 204.55 mph. CARLOS J. ROZO, La Palma
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1999
Re "Cameras at Intersections Erode Right to Privacy," Ventura County Perspective, Jan. 31. Apparently Kent Williams has never been in an accident caused by someone running a red light. About a year ago, a person ran a red light and severely damaged the front of my automobile. Fortunately, no one was injured. A little mathematics shows that if the accident had occurred 0.4 seconds later, my car would have been hit in the passenger door. A broadside collision would certainly have resulted in severe injuries, even death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A remote camera snapped more than 350 high-quality images of mountain lion P-13 and her kittens as they fed on a mule deer over two nights in Malibu Creek State Park last week.  The cameras were set up to check on the male and female kittens, P-30 and P-28, who biologists haven't seen since they were tagged when they were about three weeks old, said biologist Jeff Sikich with the National Park Service. The kittens are now 10 months old, and though they have trackers that pinpoint their locations, Sikich said he was interested in how healthy they look.
HOME & GARDEN
February 22, 2014 | By Scarlet Cheng
For a decade, while traveling to perform in concerts, Moby was looking for a new place to call home. His longtime city of choice, New York, had become so gentrified and expensive that artists - his spiritual kin - were being driven out. "I was looking for a city that was warm in the winter, had access to nature and was primarily filled with weird artists," Moby says, seated in the guest house of his Beachwood Canyon estate. "Honestly, this is the only place that satisfied all the criteria.
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