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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
Lawmakers blocked a proposal Tuesday to allow Beverly Hills police officers to use cameras to catch speeders, saying it would put collecting fines above stopping dangerous drivers. State Sen. Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica) had written legislation for a test program in which Beverly Hills officers would hold a camera triggered by a radar gun that would record speeders. Tickets would be mailed to violators. But the Senate Transportation Committee deadlocked 5 to 5 on the bill. Sen. Jenny Oropeza (D-Long Beach)
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OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
The recent revelation that the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department secretly conducted aerial surveillance of the entire city of Compton for nine days in 2012 prompted outrage from the city's mayor, its residents and civil liberties groups. The Sheriff's Department justified the surveillance by saying it was only a brief test of a program provided by a private security company. A small, manned Cessna plane equipped with an array of cameras flew six hours a day and only in daylight, beaming video information back to the local sheriff's station.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
In a climactic car-chase scene in the new movie "Need for Speed," a race car barrels into the back of a police SUV, sending the truck flying through the air. To put viewers in the drivers' seats, director Scott Waugh placed cameras inside the SUV so they could feel the sensation of the truck rotating in the air. He positioned cameras on the head of the stunt driver maneuvering the vehicle that collides with the SUV, and in the car driven by Tobey...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Angel Jennings, Richard Winton and James Rainey
After learning this week of a nine-day aerial surveillance program conducted in 2012, Compton Mayor Aja Brown proposed a policy that would require authorities to notify the public before installing monitoring equipment. “There is nothing worse than believing you are being observed by a third party unnecessarily,” Compton Mayor Aja Brown said Wednesday. “We want to assure the peace of mind of our citizens.” The proposal for the so-called “citizen privacy protection policy” came amid public outrage among Compton residents who were never notified of the pilot surveillance program and said it amounted to an invasion of privacy.  For nine days in early 2012, a small Cessna plane recorded low-resolution images of every corner of the 10.1-square-mile city and beamed them to the local Sheriff's Department station, where deputies observed incidents including fender benders, a string of necklace snatchings and a shooting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
Cameras installed inside Los Angeles County jails have been a powerful tool in vetting allegations of deputies abusing inmates, according to a watchdog report released Thursday. For years, critics of the Sheriff's Department's jails pushed the department to install cameras in the lockups since independent witnesses are rarely present when deputies use force. In 2011, following an onslaught of inmate abuse allegations, the department began installing hundreds of cameras. The report released by the agency's civilian monitor Thursday found that the footage has helped to exonerate deputies who were falsely accused and build cases against those who break the rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010
Paul Greengrass' films are known for kinetic action and lightning-quick editing, and his latest, the Iraq war thriller "Green Zone," is no exception. Greengrass and cinematographer Barry Ackroyd shot the action sequences in long, continuous takes with multiple cameras that had staggered start times, so one camera would be filming while another was reloading. "This allowed the actors to inhabit their environments more fully," explained editor and co-producer Christopher Rouse, who had to then break the raw footage down into categories (coverage of a single character, for instance)
OPINION
November 24, 2004
Re "Nurses Find Hidden Cameras at Hospital," Nov. 18: I would like to ask the administrators at the Good Samaritan Hospital if it was their intention to post signs in the nurses break room to inform them they were under surveillance, then why did they feel the need to hide the cameras? GPS in our cars, cameras in our break rooms, what we record on TiVo sold to advertisers: Where will it all end? Maggie Hittinger RN Anaheim
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1999
In your March 10 article about cameras at railroad crossings, you stated that a train going 79 miles per hour would take three seconds to travel the length of three football fields. At that speed it would take 7.7 seconds to do it. To travel three football fields in three seconds, the train must be traveling at 204.55 mph. CARLOS J. ROZO, La Palma
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Men interested in a permanent form of birth control are turning to an unlikely source for medical advice - "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" correspondent Jason Jones, who televised his vasectomy on Thursday night's program. As Jones describes it, he went to the doctor after suffering for five years from a mysterious malady that caused him to feel lethargic, gain weight and hear voices at night. The stunning diagnosis: "You have children. " And the condition was contagious, Jones explained: "Tragically, through unprotected intercourse, I had spread children to my wife," fellow "Daily Show" correspondent Samantha Bee . “Similar to herpes, you are stuck with children for the rest of you life.” The children the couple already had could not be “cured,” Jones said, but the simple procedure could prevent future “outbreaks.” So he went to Dr. David M. Weiner (yes, that's his real name)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1999
Re "Cameras at Intersections Erode Right to Privacy," Ventura County Perspective, Jan. 31. Apparently Kent Williams has never been in an accident caused by someone running a red light. About a year ago, a person ran a red light and severely damaged the front of my automobile. Fortunately, no one was injured. A little mathematics shows that if the accident had occurred 0.4 seconds later, my car would have been hit in the passenger door. A broadside collision would certainly have resulted in severe injuries, even death.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Jay Jones, reporting from Las Vegas, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Those instant cameras that Polaroid popularized in the mid-20th century (“Meet the Swinger! The Polaroid Swinger!”) are now right where they belong: in a museum in Las Vegas. You'll find the museum in the two-story Polaroid Fotobar shop at the Linq, the new entertainment and retail complex along the Strip. The Fotobar stores - there are four in Florida besides the Vegas location - offer photo gifts created from your own photography. Polaroid, its museum website says, was the Apple of its day. Its foldable SX-70, the low-cost Swinger ($19.95)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Kate Mather
Two former L.A. County sheriff's deputies allegedly turned off the electricity and a security camera system inside a medical marijuana dispensary as they planted guns they used to justify two arrests, according to court documents. Julio Cesar Martinez, 39, and Anthony Manuel Paez, 32, have been charged with two felony counts of conspiring to obstruct justice and altering evidence, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. Martinez faces two additional felony counts of perjury and filing a false report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Kate Mather
Two former Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies have been charged with planting guns at a medical marijuana dispensary to arrest two men, one of whom prosecutors said was sentenced to a year in jail before the bad evidence was discovered. Julio Cesar Martinez, 39, and Anthony Manuel Paez, 32, face two felony counts of conspiracy to obstruct justice and altering evidence, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced Wednesday. Martinez was charged with two additional felony counts of perjury and one count of filing a false report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By A Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department acknowledged this week that Compton residents were not notified of an airborne video-surveillance program that was tested in 2012. "No notification to the residents was made because this system was being tested in a city where cameras were already deployed and the system was only being evaluated," the department said in a statement released Tuesday. Officials said the department decided the program was not useful and dropped it after the test period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Richard Winton
Los Angeles County sheriff's officials said Wednesday there were no "Big Brother" aspects to an airborne video-surveillance program over Compton that was tested in 2012. Under the nine-day trial program in January 2012, a video camera was mounted on a small plane that was deployed for six-hour periods during the day, the department said. The plane, which flew out of Long Beach Airport, was operated by a private company that provides airborne surveillance technology. Nicole Nishida, a sheriff's spokeswoman, said the program was limited in scope and the department did not see a need to announce it because the city already used ground surveillance cameras in any areas.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has applied for a patent that details a way to fit a camera into a contact lens. The patent has to do with the tech giant's smart contact lens project, which was first announced earlier this year . By fitting a camera into a contact lens, users could process all kinds of data that could then be relayed to a connected smartphone. The patent, which was reported by Patent Bolt , outlines a way that Google could fit a camera into a contact lens without drastically increasing its thickness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001
Three cheers for Ventura for adding red lights with cameras to catch traffic violators. We have written to Thousand Oaks City Council members for more than two years asking them to install camera lights at the intersection of Westlake and Thousand Oaks boulevards. As usual, they are not only slow-growth, but no-growth in knowledge. They are still studying it. Hopefully we can encourage the Thousand Oaks City Council to move into the 21st century with this letter to the editor. Bernard Merkle Westlake Village
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Samsung Electronics Co. has produced the most formidable rival yet to the iPhone 5s: the Galaxy S5. The device, released over the weekend, is the fifth edition of the company's successful line of Galaxy S smartphones. Its predecessor, the Galaxy S4, sold more than 10 million units worldwide just one month after being launched last year. The GS5 may be more of an incremental step forward from its predecessor and will face more competition from capable, lower-cost devices. But the new Galaxy is expected to be one of the highest-selling phones in the U.S. this year.
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