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Camille Pissarro

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BOOKS
December 1, 1985
I read with interest Daniel Fuchs' review of Irving Stone's circumstantial novel on Camille Pissarro and the Impressionists, "Depths of Glory" (Sunday, Oct. 20). The review was thorough, scholarly and . . . flawed. Fuchs placed the isle of St. Thomas "on the Dutch West Indies"! St. Thomas was part of the Danish West Indies at the time of Pissarro's birth. The island was purchased by the United States in 1917 and is one of today's U.S. Virgin Islands. Be informed that, to this day, Camille Pissarro continues to be the island's favored son (so says the plaque on the front porch of his birthplace . . . now Sears & Roebuck)
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
July 3, 2010 | By Sam Watters, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Tucked away at the Sierra Madre Historical Preservation Society is an intriguing photo of a young woman sitting in a leafy, patchy garden. A man with folded arms stands quietly behind her as she paints. Photographs like this made their way from West to East at the close of the 19th century, conjuring up an imagined land where roses scented the family parlor and every garden was picture-perfect. When this image reached Aunt May in snowy Minneapolis and Cousin Bob in steamy New Orleans, its meaning was hazy.
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TRAVEL
April 21, 1985
I have been sternly reproved by Doubleday's French editor, Beverly Gordey, for misremembering the name of my hotel on the Left Bank of Paris (Traveling in Style, March 17). The charming suite Gordey found for us was in the Hotel St. Simon on the Rue St. Simon, our headquarters while we did the research for our forthcoming book, "Depths of Glory," about Camille Pissarro and the French Impressionists. I wouldn't want the readers of the Los Angeles Times magazine to end up at the wrong Parisian hotel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams
After a lunch of chopped egg and crackers, Claude Cassirer plants his walker on the worn floorboards of his tiny living room, rhythmically inching his way down the hall to his study. It is a short constitutional he takes each day to regard a gilt-framed memento of a lost life of privilege. The frame holds a copy of an Impressionist masterpiece, " Rue Saint-Honore, Apres Midi, Effet de Pluie," by Camille Pissarro, which takes him back to his grandmother's lavishly furnished Berlin parlor in the 1920s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams
After a lunch of chopped egg and crackers, Claude Cassirer plants his walker on the worn floorboards of his tiny living room, rhythmically inching his way down the hall to his study. It is a short constitutional he takes each day to regard a gilt-framed memento of a lost life of privilege. The frame holds a copy of an Impressionist masterpiece, " Rue Saint-Honore, Apres Midi, Effet de Pluie," by Camille Pissarro, which takes him back to his grandmother's lavishly furnished Berlin parlor in the 1920s.
HOME & GARDEN
July 3, 2010 | By Sam Watters, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Tucked away at the Sierra Madre Historical Preservation Society is an intriguing photo of a young woman sitting in a leafy, patchy garden. A man with folded arms stands quietly behind her as she paints. Photographs like this made their way from West to East at the close of the 19th century, conjuring up an imagined land where roses scented the family parlor and every garden was picture-perfect. When this image reached Aunt May in snowy Minneapolis and Cousin Bob in steamy New Orleans, its meaning was hazy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1985 | JOHN M. LEIGHTY, United Press International
Novelist Irving Stone, 82, looked over a vista of his hometown of San Francisco and said he was inspired at a young age by the great writers who emerged from the Bay Area. However, he said he does not know where his talent derived that has resulted in 25 books selling 30 million copies worldwide, the latest being "Depths of Glory," the story of the French Impressionist artist Camille Pissarro. (Doubleday, $19.95).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2005 | Barbara Isenberg, Special to The Times
PAUL CEZANNE was clearly intrigued by his friend Camille Pissarro's painting "Louveciennes." He needed more time with it. So one day he borrowed it from Pissarro, took it home and began to study it. Then he copied it. Exhibited together at the Museum of Modern Art, Pissarro's "Louveciennes" of 1871 and Cezanne's of 1872 are the most obvious example of a creative exchange between Cezanne and Pissarro that spanned more than two decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
THERE are two ways to look at "Pioneering Modern Painting: Cezanne and Pissarro 1865-1885," the engrossing new exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art that turns a bright spotlight on the friendly working relationship between two late-19th century French artists. One way is as a competition; the other is as a conversation. As a competition, it's not a fair fight. Poor Camille! Camille Pissarro (1830-1903) was a charmer.
BOOKS
October 20, 1985 | Daniel Fuchs, Fuchs is a movie writer and novelist and has written biographical pictures
The old-time sailing vessels, coming across the Atlantic from New York and South America, were obliged to stop for provisions. The new steamships, as they appeared on the scene and proliferated, took the crossing in an unbroken jump, thereby making obsolete the ship chandlering businesses on the way. One of these businesses, on the Dutch West Indies island of St.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
THERE are two ways to look at "Pioneering Modern Painting: Cezanne and Pissarro 1865-1885," the engrossing new exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art that turns a bright spotlight on the friendly working relationship between two late-19th century French artists. One way is as a competition; the other is as a conversation. As a competition, it's not a fair fight. Poor Camille! Camille Pissarro (1830-1903) was a charmer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2005 | Barbara Isenberg, Special to The Times
PAUL CEZANNE was clearly intrigued by his friend Camille Pissarro's painting "Louveciennes." He needed more time with it. So one day he borrowed it from Pissarro, took it home and began to study it. Then he copied it. Exhibited together at the Museum of Modern Art, Pissarro's "Louveciennes" of 1871 and Cezanne's of 1872 are the most obvious example of a creative exchange between Cezanne and Pissarro that spanned more than two decades.
BOOKS
December 1, 1985
I read with interest Daniel Fuchs' review of Irving Stone's circumstantial novel on Camille Pissarro and the Impressionists, "Depths of Glory" (Sunday, Oct. 20). The review was thorough, scholarly and . . . flawed. Fuchs placed the isle of St. Thomas "on the Dutch West Indies"! St. Thomas was part of the Danish West Indies at the time of Pissarro's birth. The island was purchased by the United States in 1917 and is one of today's U.S. Virgin Islands. Be informed that, to this day, Camille Pissarro continues to be the island's favored son (so says the plaque on the front porch of his birthplace . . . now Sears & Roebuck)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1985 | JOHN M. LEIGHTY, United Press International
Novelist Irving Stone, 82, looked over a vista of his hometown of San Francisco and said he was inspired at a young age by the great writers who emerged from the Bay Area. However, he said he does not know where his talent derived that has resulted in 25 books selling 30 million copies worldwide, the latest being "Depths of Glory," the story of the French Impressionist artist Camille Pissarro. (Doubleday, $19.95).
BOOKS
October 20, 1985 | Daniel Fuchs, Fuchs is a movie writer and novelist and has written biographical pictures
The old-time sailing vessels, coming across the Atlantic from New York and South America, were obliged to stop for provisions. The new steamships, as they appeared on the scene and proliferated, took the crossing in an unbroken jump, thereby making obsolete the ship chandlering businesses on the way. One of these businesses, on the Dutch West Indies island of St.
TRAVEL
April 21, 1985
I have been sternly reproved by Doubleday's French editor, Beverly Gordey, for misremembering the name of my hotel on the Left Bank of Paris (Traveling in Style, March 17). The charming suite Gordey found for us was in the Hotel St. Simon on the Rue St. Simon, our headquarters while we did the research for our forthcoming book, "Depths of Glory," about Camille Pissarro and the French Impressionists. I wouldn't want the readers of the Los Angeles Times magazine to end up at the wrong Parisian hotel.
TRAVEL
October 21, 1990 | PETER MIKELBANK, Mikelbank is a free-lance writer based in Paris
The Seine rarely dances in Paris. Surrounded by city, unconnected to nature, it's a sullen, dark river, industrially trafficked and plowed to an incessant tourist highway. A green river; sometimes, a gray-blue shade like steel, along a high corridor of stone. Only as the Seine approaches suburban precincts does the river's lively brasher color, the silver of sunlight played on water, return.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1996 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Celebrating Renoir: Pierre-Auguste Renoir's masterpiece, "Luncheon of the Boating Party," will be the centerpiece of a major French Impressionist exhibition opening Sept. 21 at the Phillips Collection in Washington.
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