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NEWS
October 7, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They rarely gripe about NAFTA, never invaded Mexico and paint themselves as similarly threatened by the U.S. giant. Unfailingly diplomatic, Canadians have long been the northern neighbors that Mexicans could love. But Monday, it was the Canadian government that was in hot water with Mexico. The Canadian ambassador here was forced to step down after granting an interview in which he labeled Mexico corrupt and described this country's war on drugs as a "joke."
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NEWS
March 19, 2000 | Reuters
The rivalry between Canadian Finance Minister Paul Martin and Prime Minister Jean Chretien boiled into the open once more Saturday as Martin publicly declared his interest in eventually replacing Chretien. It was the first time Ottawa political veterans could recall him openly launching a challenge for the top spot, although he couched it in a declaration of continued loyalty to Chretien.
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NEWS
February 18, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suppose for a moment that you're the leader of a peaceable middle-sized power, and your approval rating is in the basement. Suppose you're facing the hideously real possibility that one of your largest, most important provinces will soon break away. And suppose your credibility is in such a shambles that you can do next to nothing about anything. That is the bind in which Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney has found himself.
NEWS
December 25, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adrienne Clarkson may seem an unlikely choice for Canada's governor-general, the representative of Queen Elizabeth II. An immigrant from Hong Kong who arrived here in 1942 without papers, Clarkson has a background that's not British, not French, not native Canadian. At 60, she is a well-known TV journalist and author who has spent a lifetime crossing boundaries, not a member of the political establishment that created them. But that, she argues, is exactly what makes her perfect for the job.
NEWS
December 25, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adrienne Clarkson may seem an unlikely choice for Canada's governor-general, the representative of Queen Elizabeth II. An immigrant from Hong Kong who arrived here in 1942 without papers, Clarkson has a background that's not British, not French, not native Canadian. At 60, she is a well-known TV journalist and author who has spent a lifetime crossing boundaries, not a member of the political establishment that created them. But that, she argues, is exactly what makes her perfect for the job.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | Reuters
The rivalry between Canadian Finance Minister Paul Martin and Prime Minister Jean Chretien boiled into the open once more Saturday as Martin publicly declared his interest in eventually replacing Chretien. It was the first time Ottawa political veterans could recall him openly launching a challenge for the top spot, although he couched it in a declaration of continued loyalty to Chretien.
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney called kickback allegations against him a "grotesque lie" as he testified in his $38-million libel suit against the federal government. The allegations are contained in a letter to Swiss authorities from Canada's Justice Department. The letter alleges that he received kickbacks on a $1.3-billion contract to sell Airbus jets to then-government-owned Air Canada in 1988.
NEWS
May 2, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Deputy Prime Minister Sheila Copps resigned from Parliament, fulfilling a 1993 campaign promise to quit if the government failed to abolish an unpopular tax on all goods and services. Prime Minister Jean Chretien's government had pledged in its campaign platform to "replace" the 7% tax adopted by the government of former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, but instead last month moved to merge the federal tax with provincial sales taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1992
Canada's so-called "Green Plan," a wide-ranging strategy adopted to protect its environment and natural resources, will be discussed tonight at UC Irvine. Brian Emmett, Canada's assistant deputy minister for the environment and one of the authors of the Green Plan, will discuss how the plan was developed, and how the government achieved consensus among a wide range of residents, from environmentalists to business and commercial interests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1992 | Barbara McDougall, Canadian foreign minister, addressed the Los Angeles World Affairs Council on Wednesday. From her prepared text:
Global Cooperation and Security "There are notions around that the end of the Cold War is a signal that we can withdraw from the world, as if what happens in other places is now of concern only to the people who live there. This is seen in the rise of political fundamentalism in Canada, and it is certainly true in the current election race here in the United States.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | From Reuters
Canada warned Yugoslavia's leaders Saturday that they will be held responsible for any war crimes committed in Kosovo, and vowed to enforce international justice. "Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic must understand that political and military leaders will be held personally accountable for all violations of international humanitarian law, war crimes and crimes against humanity," Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister Lloyd Axworthy said in a statement.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1999 | JAMES BATES
It's ironic that Canada's Sheila Copps was in Los Angeles last weekend for Hollywood's biggest event, the Oscars, given that she is regularly at odds with the U.S. entertainment industry. As that country's heritage minister, Copps, who was in town to celebrate Canadian director Norman Jewison's Irving G. Thalberg Award, is an outspoken proponent of aggressive government actions that aid Canadian books, magazines, music, TV shows and movies, sometimes at the expense of American product.
NEWS
January 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Louise Frechette of Canada was named deputy secretary-general of the United Nations. It is the first time the world body has had such a position in its 52-year history. U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan, who had let it be known that he sought a woman for the job, nevertheless told a news conference: "I was looking for the best person to take the job, and it happens to be a woman." Annan worked closely with Frechette, 51, when she served as Canada's U.N.
NEWS
October 7, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They rarely gripe about NAFTA, never invaded Mexico and paint themselves as similarly threatened by the U.S. giant. Unfailingly diplomatic, Canadians have long been the northern neighbors that Mexicans could love. But Monday, it was the Canadian government that was in hot water with Mexico. The Canadian ambassador here was forced to step down after granting an interview in which he labeled Mexico corrupt and described this country's war on drugs as a "joke."
BUSINESS
January 22, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Canadian Foreign Minister Lloyd Axworthy began a visit to Havana that underscored Ottowa's difference with Washington over Cuba policy. Axworthy's trip, which has been criticized by the U.S., is the highest-level visit to the island by a Canadian official in two decades. Canadian officials have stressed that Ottawa seeks to encourage change in Cuba through dialogue rather than isolation, as Washington has done.
NEWS
October 5, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien abruptly forced the resignation Friday of his beleaguered defense minister, David M. Collenette, ostensibly for having inappropriately interfered with an immigration case. Chretien said he was extremely sorry to accept the resignation of his longtime friend and political ally but added: "I told him that I hope soon I'll be in a position to take him back into my Cabinet."
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | Reuters
Gen. John de Chastelain, chief of Canada's defense staff, has been named ambassador to the United States, the government announced Wednesday. De Chastelain, 55, will replace Derek Burney.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH and CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Canadians went to the polls Monday and drastically redrew their country's political map, throwing out Prime Minister Kim Campbell and electing a majority Liberal Party government led by Jean Chretien, a 59-year-old French-speaking lawyer from Quebec. Voters delivered an astonishing rebuke to the Progressive Conservative Party, which has governed since 1984, first under Brian Mulroney and for the last five months under Campbell.
NEWS
August 9, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Canadian Prime Minister Kim Campbell, 49, the first woman to lead her nation, was named Thursday as Canada's consul general in Los Angeles, effective Sept. 16. Campbell, who has been a lecturer at UC Irvine since February, was selected for the post by Prime Minister Jean Chretien, who dealt Campbell a crushing 1993 election defeat. The consulate in Los Angeles represents the Canadian government in trade, immigration, cultural affairs and other issues in California and four other states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996
Former Canadian Prime Minister Kim Campbell, 49, the first woman to lead her nation, was named Thursday as Canada's consul general in Los Angeles, effective Sept. 16. Campbell, who has been a lecturer at UC Irvine since February, was selected for the post by Prime Minister Jean Chretien, who dealt Campbell a crushing election defeat in October 1993.
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