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NEWS
February 18, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suppose for a moment that you're the leader of a peaceable middle-sized power, and your approval rating is in the basement. Suppose you're facing the hideously real possibility that one of your largest, most important provinces will soon break away. And suppose your credibility is in such a shambles that you can do next to nothing about anything. That is the bind in which Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney has found himself.
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NEWS
January 8, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY and CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
China expelled three Canadian members of Parliament on Tuesday in apparent retaliation for their activities highlighting human rights abuses here. "I have never seen anyone . . . as unceremoniously and bodily manhandled and thrown around as I was--and my colleagues were--today," Geoffrey Scott, 53, a Progressive Conservative Party representative from Ontario, told reporters after arrival in the British colony of Hong Kong.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canada, a country that has always stressed what it is not, is having trouble finding what it is. Canada is not urban gang wars, or deranged loners shooting up cafeterias and bank lobbies with alarming regularity. It is not foreign adventures of the Vietnam or Nicaragua variety. It is not the Ku Klux Klan. Canada is not movie stars winning high office. It is not 30 million people making do without health insurance. In short, Canadians are eager to tell you, Canada is not the United States.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney has managed to survive a 16% popularity rating, a grueling recession, the rebirth of Quebec separatism and widespread calls for his resignation. But now, Canadians are wondering whether he can weather a weird but powerful attack by a lone, obsessed and bankrupt businessman.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The Canadian capital's best-known gadfly has succeeded in forcing authorities to charge a sports minister and 15 prominent police officials and politicians from Prime Minister Brian Mulroney's party with graft. Former businessman Glen Kealey battled for three years to have his allegations of corruption in the Progressive Conservative government taken seriously. On Wednesday, after a 17-day hearing, a justice of the peace gave him permission to press charges.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, threatened by growing pressure for Quebec's independence and shrinking public support, shuffled senior Cabinet ministers Sunday. The Conservative Party, in power since 1984, is mired in third place with 16% in opinion polls. Mulroney gave new jobs to half of the Cabinet's 40 members of Parliament.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Canada-watchers look north for clues on how well this vast, diverse nation is holding together, they usually set their sights on Quebec, the French-speaking province in the east that periodically makes noises about independence. These days, though, they might just as well turn their gaze west, toward Canada's prairie heartland.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH
The man who has channeled western Canadian disaffection into Canada's fastest-growing political party is Preston Manning, 48, the son of a prairie populist who governed the province of Alberta for a record 25 years. Manning grew up on a 70-Holstein dairy farm, read the Bible assiduously, studied economics at the University of Alberta and watched from the ringside as his father, the famous Ernest Manning, governed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990
Canadian Ambassador Derek Burney in Los Angeles Tuesday called for prompt approval by Congress of a new clear air act, including a provision on acid rain, which he described as "the most divisive issue" between the United States and his country. Burney told The Times that congressional failure to enact a clean air act or a presidential veto of the measure would be a setback for the environment and relations between the United States and Canada.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | From Associated Press
Troops backed by armored vehicles and helicopters on Saturday swept into a Mohawk community at the hub of a 53-day protest. Gen. Armand Roy, commander of the Canadian Forces 5th Brigade, said he decided to send in his troops after two Mohawk men were wounded in the factional fighting behind Indian barricades set up in a land dispute with government officials. "I decided to move my troops so as to guarantee the security of civilians and my soldiers," Roy said.
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