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Canada Government Officials

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990
Canadian Ambassador Derek Burney in Los Angeles Tuesday called for prompt approval by Congress of a new clear air act, including a provision on acid rain, which he described as "the most divisive issue" between the United States and his country. Burney told The Times that congressional failure to enact a clean air act or a presidential veto of the measure would be a setback for the environment and relations between the United States and Canada.
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NEWS
September 2, 1990 | From Associated Press
Troops backed by armored vehicles and helicopters on Saturday swept into a Mohawk community at the hub of a 53-day protest. Gen. Armand Roy, commander of the Canadian Forces 5th Brigade, said he decided to send in his troops after two Mohawk men were wounded in the factional fighting behind Indian barricades set up in a land dispute with government officials. "I decided to move my troops so as to guarantee the security of civilians and my soldiers," Roy said.
NEWS
September 1, 1990 | From Reuters
Mohawks and Canadian soldiers worked Friday to clear blockades from a major Montreal bridge, but troops maintained their siege around a small but defiant band of Indians at a nearby resort. Talks between Quebec officials and Mohawks to end a long standoff at Oka, a lakeside resort where the conflict erupted in July, collapsed Thursday night, prompting the province to revive an earlier order to have the army clear the barricades there.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than two weeks ago, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney could argue that he had it all sewn up: The political elite of the country had signed a constitutional deal that would avert the threatened breakup of English- and French-speaking Canada. No more. In a remarkable political upset, public opinion has swept Mulroney's arduously crafted plans into complete disarray. The constitutional deal that looked like a juggernaut just one week ago now looks as though it will die Saturday.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newfoundland Premier Clyde Wells said Monday that he will put a controversial package of constitutional amendments to a vote in the provincial legislature sometime in the next two weeks. The Newfoundland legislators will vote on whether to ratify amendments, coupled with a political accord hammered out last week, that give special powers to the French-speaking province of Quebec. The possibility of amending the constitution in this way has touched off a bitter debate all across Canada.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canada's leaders signed a tentative agreement to amend the constitution and grant special status to the French-speaking province of Quebec in an attempt to head off a brewing constitutional and linguistic crisis.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mood in Canada has swung from hope to discouragement and even cynicism as the nation's top leaders Friday wrapped up a full week of closed-door talks on its constitution with little yet to show for their efforts. Late Friday evening, premiers emerged from yet another marathon session claiming they had an agreement in principle--but they added that there were still some stumbling blocks, and hopes were dashed once again, as they already have several times this week.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Key talks on reshaping the Canadian constitution were on the brink of collapse at the end of a marathon session Thursday, as Quebec's provincial Premier Robert Bourassa announced that he would no longer participate in any discussion of Quebec's "distinct" role within the nation. The so-called distinct-society constitutional clause has been a central element of this week's talks, and it is hard to see how the other negotiators can proceed without Bourassa.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No solution to Canada's growing constitutional and linguistic problems emerged Monday as Prime Minister Brian Mulroney completed a second day of make-or-break talks with this country's 10 provincial premiers. Months of debate over a package of constitutional amendments has awakened such sharp bitterness over language issues in Canada that some analysts fear the country could finally split into French and English-speaking sub-states, as it last threatened to do 10 years ago.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Brian Mulroney was embroiled in the worst crisis of his six years in power Tuesday after his top Quebec minister resigned in a dispute over French-speaking Quebec's future in Canada. Environment Minister Lucien Bouchard, who was the leader of Mulroney's pivotal Quebec caucus, quit the Cabinet on Monday after sending a telegram hailing this week's 10th anniversary of Quebec's separatist referendum.
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