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NEWS
December 23, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ahmed Ressam arrived at the Montreal airport in 1994, he applied for political asylum, claiming he was in danger in his country because Algerian authorities mistakenly believed him to be a terrorist. Canada gave him the benefit of the doubt.
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BUSINESS
December 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
The government of Canada sued R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Holdings Inc. for $1 billion Tuesday, charging that it and related companies conspired to smuggle tobacco products into Canada to avoid millions of dollars in taxes. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Syracuse, N.Y., alleges the companies set up an elaborate network of smugglers and offshore companies to flood Canada with cheap cigarettes after the government doubled taxes and duties on tobacco in 1991.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Canadian government said it has hired Jeffrey Wigand, the man who blew the whistle on the U.S. tobacco industry and inspired the movie "The Insider," as a special health consultant on national tobacco policies. Wigand is a former vice president and head of research for U.S. tobacco company Brown & Williamson, a unit of British American Tobacco. "The Insider" is based in part on his struggle several years ago to reveal the inside workings of the industry.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Quebec's separatist government, warning of dire consequences, is urging Canada to think twice before legislating on the rules under which the province could secede. The Canadian government is considering legislation to establish a set of rules on Quebec secession in an effort to be prepared for another referendum. Ottawa was roundly criticized for being caught off guard by the 1995 referendum that the separatists came close to winning.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Canada's finance minister is expected to block two proposed bank unions, which would have ranked among the largest transactions in Canadian history, because of concern they would erode competition, sources said Sunday. Finance Minister Paul Martin will deliver a decision on merger proposals by four of the country's Big Six banks this morning, a Finance Department spokesman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1998 | Religion News Service
One of the largest Christian ministries in North America has been rebuked by Canada's broadcast ethics watchdog for airing allegedly questionable commentary about homosexuals. The Focus on the Family show, which airs on hundreds of radio stations in Canada and more than 2,300 in the United States, has been found in violation of the human rights code of the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council.
NEWS
January 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Canadian government extended a hand Wednesday in apology for more than a century of mistreatment of aboriginal peoples--but the gesture was rebuffed by some as not going far enough. A "statement of reconciliation" was the centerpiece of Ottawa's response to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. It was accompanied by a pledge of $420 million for native peoples over the next four years on top of current funding.
NEWS
September 20, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Summers are fleeting in Canada, and so are respites from the great national debate over whether Quebec's separatists can rend the country by leading their French-speaking province to independence. Already last Sunday, it was gray and damp and the temperature was in the 40s when the elected leaders of the nation's 11 English-speaking provinces and territories gathered here at the foot of the Rocky Mountains.
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien was reelected Monday with a reduced majority in Parliament after an election campaign that deepened the regional animosities pulling this country. Late returns showed Chretien's centrist Liberal Party, running on its economic record, winning 155 of the 301 seats in the House of Commons by piling up votes in central Canada, particularly the populous province of Ontario.
NEWS
May 11, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting up a new confrontation with Quebec's separatists, the Canadian government announced Friday that it will take them on in court. Justice Minister Allan Rock said the federal government will intervene in a Montreal civil lawsuit and challenge separatist doctrine that Quebec voters alone can decide on the independence of the French-speaking province--without regard to Canada's constitution and without the consent of the rest of the country.
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