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NEWS
October 22, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Quebec's separatist government, warning of dire consequences, is urging Canada to think twice before legislating on the rules under which the province could secede. The Canadian government is considering legislation to establish a set of rules on Quebec secession in an effort to be prepared for another referendum. Ottawa was roundly criticized for being caught off guard by the 1995 referendum that the separatists came close to winning.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1998 | Religion News Service
One of the largest Christian ministries in North America has been rebuked by Canada's broadcast ethics watchdog for airing allegedly questionable commentary about homosexuals. The Focus on the Family show, which airs on hundreds of radio stations in Canada and more than 2,300 in the United States, has been found in violation of the human rights code of the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council.
NEWS
January 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Canadian government extended a hand Wednesday in apology for more than a century of mistreatment of aboriginal peoples--but the gesture was rebuffed by some as not going far enough. A "statement of reconciliation" was the centerpiece of Ottawa's response to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. It was accompanied by a pledge of $420 million for native peoples over the next four years on top of current funding.
NEWS
September 20, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Summers are fleeting in Canada, and so are respites from the great national debate over whether Quebec's separatists can rend the country by leading their French-speaking province to independence. Already last Sunday, it was gray and damp and the temperature was in the 40s when the elected leaders of the nation's 11 English-speaking provinces and territories gathered here at the foot of the Rocky Mountains.
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien was reelected Monday with a reduced majority in Parliament after an election campaign that deepened the regional animosities pulling this country. Late returns showed Chretien's centrist Liberal Party, running on its economic record, winning 155 of the 301 seats in the House of Commons by piling up votes in central Canada, particularly the populous province of Ontario.
NEWS
May 11, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting up a new confrontation with Quebec's separatists, the Canadian government announced Friday that it will take them on in court. Justice Minister Allan Rock said the federal government will intervene in a Montreal civil lawsuit and challenge separatist doctrine that Quebec voters alone can decide on the independence of the French-speaking province--without regard to Canada's constitution and without the consent of the rest of the country.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Prince of Wales toured this wintry gateway to Canada's agricultural heartland Thursday during a weeklong trip to Canada that many are treating as a Canadian audition by the heir to the throne. Media treatment of the visit repeatedly has referred to Prince Charles as "the man who would be king of Canada," and more than a few Canadians are ready to put a question mark at the end of that phrase.
NEWS
February 24, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That cracking sound coming from north of the U.S. border isn't ice breaking in the spring thaw. It's the splintering of Canada's body politic. Members of Parliament return to work in Ottawa on Tuesday after an extended mid-winter recess and are still without a consensus on the best strategy for battling Quebec's resurgent separatists. Is it time to get tough with the secessionists, even at the risk of violence? Should the government draw a line in the snow and dare the separatists to cross it?
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canada is jettisoning its decades-old image as an international conciliator and defender of human rights, reshaping its foreign policy to try to rake in more trade--including a slice of the burgeoning world arms market.
NEWS
January 26, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Aiming to weaken a separatist drive in Quebec, Prime Minister Jean Chretien named two Quebeckers to his Cabinet in the first ministerial shake-up of his term. Chretien changed 17 positions among 24 ministers, and the Cabinet now has six ministers from Quebec. Chretien has been widely criticized for not doing more to prevent a breakup of Canada. In October, federalists defeated a separatist referendum in Quebec by 50.6% to 49.4%.
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