Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCanada Laws
IN THE NEWS

Canada Laws

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 6, 1993 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed a real leap forward for women: In a unanimous opinion, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that materials "degrading" to women could be classified as obscene, and be banned. "If true equality between male and female persons is to be achieved," concluded the court, "we cannot ignore the threat to equality resulting from exposure . . . to certain types of violent and degrading material." That was in February, 1992, and across Canada, many women cheered.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013
Dr. Henry Morgentaler, 90, an abortion rights activist who helped overturn Canada's abortion law 25 years ago, died Wednesday at his Toronto home, according to Carolyn Egan, director and founding member of the Ontario Coalition of Abortion Clinics. The Polish-born Morgentaler emerged in 1967 as an advocate for a woman's right to have an abortion, at a time when attempting to induce one was a crime punishable by life in prison. Morgentaler later said his five-year stay in the Nazi concentration camps of Auschwitz and Dachau prepared him for his showdown with Canada's legal system, saying that in his mind, laws can be wrong.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadians who are terminally ill or suffering from certain chronic illnesses may grow and smoke their own marijuana under new rules that went into effect Monday. Despite protests from doctors, who argue that they will now be under pressure to prescribe a substance of unproven medical value, the Canadian government greatly expanded a program that previously limited medical marijuana to about 300 people nationwide.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-awaited decision by Canada's Supreme Court on Friday clarified what is and isn't child pornography, upholding a law that bans possession of child pornography but creating exceptions that child advocacy groups decried as "opening the doors to pedophiles." In resolving a yearlong challenge, the court tried to strike a balance between protecting children from sexual exploitation and preserving the freedom of thought, belief and expression.
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
In the face of overwhelming public opinion in favor of capital punishment, the Canadian Parliament on Tuesday rejected an effort to restore it. The vote, 148 to 127, came early in the morning and after three months of debate. It was the first time since 1976 that members of Parliament were allowed a free vote--to act according to their own interests rather than the dictates of party leaders. As the voting began, spokesmen on both sides had said they could not forecast the outcome.
NEWS
February 23, 1993 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Bangladeshi mother gone to ground in a Montreal battered-women's shelter is fast becoming the latest test case in a growing Canadian debate over how to handle female asylum-seekers. The central question: Is the 1951 U.N. definition of a bona fide refugee flawed because it fails to recognize that women can be persecuted simply by virtue of their gender?
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadians who are terminally ill or suffering from certain chronic illnesses may grow and smoke their own marijuana under new rules that went into effect Monday. Despite protests from doctors, who argue that they will now be under pressure to prescribe a substance of unproven medical value, the Canadian government greatly expanded a program that previously limited medical marijuana to about 300 people nationwide.
NEWS
June 16, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Supreme Court unanimously upheld Canada's 1995 law requiring that gun owners be licensed and register firearms. The law, requiring licenses by year's end and registration of weapons by Jan. 1, 2003, has been criticized by the pro-gun lobby and some provincial governments as excessive and inefficient. The law was prompted by a gun-control campaign after a man shot and killed 14 people in Montreal in 1989.
NEWS
February 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Canadian government announced an overhaul of 68 federal statutes to erase most legal differences between heterosexual and homosexual couples. The sweeping changes--affecting everything from citizenship to spousal tax credits and spousal benefits in government pensions--would extend benefits and obligations to homosexual couples on the same basis as common-law heterosexual couples.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-awaited decision by Canada's Supreme Court on Friday clarified what is and isn't child pornography, upholding a law that bans possession of child pornography but creating exceptions that child advocacy groups decried as "opening the doors to pedophiles." In resolving a yearlong challenge, the court tried to strike a balance between protecting children from sexual exploitation and preserving the freedom of thought, belief and expression.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | MIKE DOWNEY
A survey of 17,300 eighth-grade students, conducted by the University of Michigan, asked how many had smoked a cigarette on a daily basis--repeat, at least one cigarette a day--during the 30 days prior to the survey. Eight percent of the eighth-graders said, yes, they had. Do the math. That's more than 1,300 kids--some no older than 12--who claim they light up a cigarette every day. OK, let's say a few of the 8% lied. You know, just trying to be funny, or else just trying to act cool.
NEWS
June 16, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Supreme Court unanimously upheld Canada's 1995 law requiring that gun owners be licensed and register firearms. The law, requiring licenses by year's end and registration of weapons by Jan. 1, 2003, has been criticized by the pro-gun lobby and some provincial governments as excessive and inefficient. The law was prompted by a gun-control campaign after a man shot and killed 14 people in Montreal in 1989.
NEWS
February 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Canadian government announced an overhaul of 68 federal statutes to erase most legal differences between heterosexual and homosexual couples. The sweeping changes--affecting everything from citizenship to spousal tax credits and spousal benefits in government pensions--would extend benefits and obligations to homosexual couples on the same basis as common-law heterosexual couples.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stretched out on an easy chair in the sunny living room of his farmhouse, surrounded by an eclectic book collection and an array of modern sculpture, Ike Lanier is bemused that at age 67 he has become something of a celebrated outlaw. His crime: trucking 300 bushels of wheat grown on his Alberta farm into Montana last summer and selling it on the open market.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When home electronics dealer Mirek Matuszewski sells a satellite television system to a customer, he hands out a little legal advice to go with it. There's nothing wrong with owning one of the pizza-sized dishes in Canada, but the minute it starts receiving U.S. programming via satellite, the owner is in breach of Canadian law. There are as many as 300,000 such outlaws in Canada today, watching television beamed from such U.S.-operated services as DirecTV and Echostar.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Canada's health minister announced Monday that the government will seek to ban all tobacco advertising, following a recent Supreme Court ruling that stuck down a law sharply restricting tobacco ads. The minister, Diane Marleau, said details of her proposal will be worked out in early 1996 during consultations with provincial governments, the health community and tobacco manufacturers.
SPORTS
January 17, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the Blue Jays postponed their Southern California tryout camps for possible replacement players last weekend because of heavy rains and flooding, one had to ask: Who could have expected a week in January in which the weather in Los Angeles would be worse than in Toronto? But that's the way things have been going for the Blue Jays. As major league baseball gropes its way into an uncertain future, the Blue Jays face more questions and obstacles than any other team.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The World Trade Organization ruled that legislation designed to shield Canada's magazine industry from competition by lower-cost U.S. publications violates international trade rules. The ruling by a WTO panel overturned the federal government's ban on split-run publications such as Time Warner Inc.'s Sports Illustrated, which in 1993 began publishing issues with U.S. editorial content and Canadian advertising. Under legislation passed in the 1960s, U.S.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Canada's health minister announced Monday that the government will seek to ban all tobacco advertising, following a recent Supreme Court ruling that stuck down a law sharply restricting tobacco ads. The minister, Diane Marleau, said details of her proposal will be worked out in early 1996 during consultations with provincial governments, the health community and tobacco manufacturers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|