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Canal Plus Company

BUSINESS
February 7, 2003 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
Vivendi Universal on Thursday replaced the head of its Canal Plus Group and abandoned plans for a public stock offering of the troubled pay-TV company, putting added pressure on chief Jean-Rene Fourtou to raise cash by selling other assets, including some of its U.S. entertainment holdings. As expected, Vivendi named Bertrand Meheut, the No.
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BUSINESS
February 27, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Canal Plus, Europe's No. 1 pay-TV company, said it's in talks with British Sky Broadcasting Group, the second-biggest, on a possible linkup. The announcement follows comments by BSkyB Chairman Jerome Seydoux, who told reporters Friday that the companies are "talking about everything, but the talks principally cover a merger--a merger between BSkyB and Canal Plus." Canal Plus and Vivendi, its parent company, later said the discussions are at a "very preliminary stage."
BUSINESS
July 23, 2002 | RICHARD VERRIER and CORIE BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a significant first step toward redefining itself, Vivendi Universal plans to sell off unprofitable portions of Canal Plus Group and float a minority stake in the remaining French pay-TV company. The move, part of a companywide effort to slash the French utility and media company's massive debt, would allow Vivendi to raise as much as $5 billion while keeping control of the powerful media property.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The turmoil over Europe's fast-emerging, multibillion-dollar digital pay TV market is intensifying. In recent weeks, media companies have announced programming packages that will bring digital pay TV to Germany, Scandinavia and the Benelux countries--Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg--for the first time this summer. At the same time, an alliance of media giants aimed at the Continent's large and lucrative German market has all but collapsed due to internal differences.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canal Plus, the European pay television heavyweight that has been pouring money into Hollywood to become a major entertainment player, is about to turn down the spigot. Canal Plus this week struck a deal to gradually withdraw from its equity partnership with Warner Bros.-based producer Arnon Milchan, which has resulted in both big hits ("Under Siege") and misses ("Memoirs of an Invisible Man").
BUSINESS
March 7, 1996 | From Times Wires Services
Rupert Murdoch on Wednesday teamed up with French companies Canal Plus and Germany's Bertelsmann in a new alliance to provide satellite pay TV in Europe. The deal strengthens the hand of Bertelsmann and Canal Plus in their battle for the German television market and answers the question of whom Murdoch would link up with in European pay television. Murdoch's News Corp.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Canal Plus, Europe's biggest pay television operator, said Wednesday that its board approved an asset swap plan with Kirch Group of Germany that could give it control of Italian pay television company Telepiu. The Paris-based company said it should sign agreements on the sale of its 37.5% stake in Premiere, a German pay TV channel, to Kirch and the purchase of Kirch's 45% stake in Telepiu "within a few days." It said it will give more details on the terms at that time.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Canal Plus said Time Warner Inc. will buy a 10% stake in its direct-to-home satellite television service, CanalSatellite, solidifying its relationship with the U.S.'s No. 1 media company. Time Warner will acquire the stake through its Warner Bros. studio, which will buy new shares in CanalSatellite through a capital increase, Canal Plus Chief Executive Pierre Lescure said in a newspaper interview. Terms of the capital increase haven't been completed. As part of a film rights agreement, the U.S.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2000 | From Reuters
Merging media giants Vivendi, Canal Plus and Seagram will have to wait for regulatory scrutiny of their deal after the European Commission said on Wednesday that it needed more data for its review. The commission said it had suspended its probe into the competition aspects of the planned $34-billion deal while the companies provide it with additional unspecified data.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Vivendi's agreement to acquire Seagram Co. and part of Canal Plus was approved by a French regulator after concessions by Vivendi. But analysts suggested the changes could jeopardize the terms of the $46-billion accord. The French media and utility company agreed to modify the acquisition, giving control of Canal Plus' French pay-TV subscriber base back to Canal Plus Programmes, a unit that will be 49% owned by Vivendi, the regulator said.
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