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OPINION
April 7, 2013 | By Susan Silk and Barry Goldman
When Susan had breast cancer, we heard a lot of lame remarks, but our favorite came from one of Susan's colleagues. She wanted, she needed, to visit Susan after the surgery, but Susan didn't feel like having visitors, and she said so. Her colleague's response? "This isn't just about you. " "It's not?" Susan wondered. "My breast cancer is not about me? It's about you?" The same theme came up again when our friend Katie had a brain aneurysm. She was in intensive care for a long time and finally got out and into a step-down unit.
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SPORTS
April 3, 2014 | Eric Sondheimer
Every once in a while, amid the emotional ups and downs of high school sports competition, there needs to be a reminder of what's truly important, and nothing offers a more powerful perspective than listening to a father's anguish about his son. "The toughest thing is, I'm completely helpless," Mission Hills Alemany baseball Coach Randy Thompson said in describing the challenge of trying to help his 12-year-old son, Tyler, make it through 15...
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2008 | Dawn MacKeen, Special to The Times
One afternoon last fall at Warner Bros. studios, Jessica Queller found herself acting more like a middle-aged woman than the youthful TV writer that she is. While tossing out lines for the headmistress, a new character on "Gossip Girl," the popular teenage soap opera she works on, Queller began formalizing her diction and sitting erect as a chalkboard to channel the drab disciplinarian. So what did her colleagues do? As a joke, they named the character "Headmistress Queller." "I found out when I saw it on TV," Queller said recently over lunch, smiling as she recalled the moment that made her very cool with her little cousins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | Jessica Garrison and Jill Cowan
A metal-finishing facility in Newport Beach poses an "unacceptably high" cancer risk to its neighbors and should curtail its emissions as soon as possible, state air quality officials said Tuesday. The South Coast Air Quality Management District said it would ask its independent hearing board to order Hixson Metal Finishing to reduce its emissions of chromium 6 "on an expedited schedule. " The plant is next to an apartment building in a neighborhood with a mix of homes and businesses near the border with Costa Mesa.
SCIENCE
March 4, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Consuming high levels of protein - particularly animal protein - is a bad strategy if you're at midlife and aiming to live into old age, new research finds. But a study out Tuesday reveals that in older age, fortifying one's diet with more protein-rich foods appears to be a formula for extending life. An article published in the journal Cell Metabolism says that, over an 18-year study period, middle-aged Americans who had the highest consumption of protein were more than four times as likely to die of cancer or diabetes, and twice as likely to die of any cause, than those whose diets were lowest in protein.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1992 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traffic radar guns, which save lives by catching speeders, have come under suspicion as a possible cause of cancer in traffic officers exposed to their microwave beams, triggering a series of lawsuits by an Agoura Hills lawyer. Attorney John E. Sweeney has filed suits on behalf of five former traffic officers who contracted cancer and are seeking millions of dollars in damages from radar equipment manufacturers, whom they accuse of failing to warn of health risks.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II and Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writers
Gastric bypass surgery -- a treatment for obesity that is already known to reduce heart disease and diabetes -- decreases the incidence of cancer by 80% over the five years following the procedure, Canadian researchers reported Wednesday. The incidence of two of the most common tumors, breast and colon, was reduced by 85% and 70%, respectively, Dr. Nicolas Christou of McGill University in Montreal said.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The breast cancer drug tamoxifen may stall the progression of non-small cell lung cancer in those who take it after breast cancer treatment, a new study has found. Tamoxifen is the oldest of a wide array of medications that block the action of the hormone estrogen in the body. Researchers have found growing evidence in recent years that the majority of non-small cell lung cancers -- the most common form of lung cancer -- respond to estrogen with growth. So they wondered whether women taking tamoxifen as an adjunct to their breast cancer treatment might be less likely to develop or die of lung cancer.
SPORTS
January 15, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
ESPN anchor Stuart Scott announced on Twitter on Monday night that he is battling cancer for the third time. "Blessed by prayers..I'm back in the Fight. C reared its head again. Chemo evry 2 wks but I'll still work, still work out..still #LIVESTRONG" Scott was first diagnosed with the disease in 2007 when doctors discovered he had cancer of the appendix while performing an appendectomy. He underwent chemotherapy and all was well until 2011, when he revealed that doctors found tumors in his small intestine.
OPINION
October 14, 2012
Re "Al Qaeda is rebuilding amid instability in Iraq," Oct. 10 It is no mystery what happens when treatment is abandoned before cancer is completely cured. It doesn't bargain; it has no conscience; it can't be reasoned with and will not stop until you are dead. Any resort to human morals in the matter will prove a deadly misplacement of priorities and evidence a fundamental lack of understanding the enemy. Unless you carve it from your body or drive it from existence by whatever means available, you're doomed to early expiration.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Michael Robertson put the bag of chemicals in an inside pocket of his sport coat, the pump in the other. He snaked the tubes between the buttons of his shirt to the port in his chest. He adjusted his tie to cover them. Then he sat down in a cavernous room in the White House complex and pulled his chair close to the table, hiding the bulges. Robertson, an aide to President Obama, was meeting with top officials from federal agencies working to implement the Affordable Care Act. He was also in treatment for stage IV colorectal cancer.
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | By Sam Farmer
ORLANDO, Fla. - The death this week of Ralph Wilson, founder and sole owner of the Buffalo Bills, was but half the heartache of the NFL franchise and its fans. Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly, who led the Bills to four Super Bowl appearances in the early 1990s, found out two weeks ago that the oral cancer he was originally diagnosed with in June has returned. His wife, Jill, wrote on her blog that "the cancer's back, aggressive, and starting to spread. " The 54-year-old Kelly, an icon in western New York, is hospitalized in Manhattan, and has been visited by a steady stream of Bills teammates.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Ellen Olivier
The event: Rebels With a Cause at Paramount Pictures Studios in Hollywood on Thursday honored Oracle Corp. co-founder and Chief Executive Larry Ellison, raising $9 million to benefit the medical research of Dr. David Agus, director of the USC Westside Cancer Center and the USC Center for Applied Molecular Medicine. The news: Paramount CEO Brad Grey announced plans to build a new cancer institute in Los Angeles. He said it's envisioned to be “a life-changing and life-saving facility, dedicated to providing the most cutting edge and groundbreaking medicine available.”   The show: Pharrell Williams bounded from onstage into the audience, singing his Oscar-nominated tune “Happy” as guests rose up to dance along, some of them, such as January Jones, snapping close-ups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - The San Diego Zoo has joined a long-odds international effort to save one of nature's tough guys: the Tasmanian devil. Although possessed of sharp fangs, a powerful jaw and a carnivorous personality, the devil is on the verge of being wiped out by a rare and contagious form of cancer on its home island of Tasmania off the coast of Australia. Wildlife officials Down Under, watching in horror as the devil population moves rapidly toward extinction, decided that a public relations effort was needed to raise public awareness about the marsupial's plight . In October, four devils arrived at the San Diego Zoo on long-term loan from the Taronga Western Plains Zoo in Australia.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Former longtime Boston Mayor  Thomas M. Menino, 71, has been diagnosed with an advanced form of cancer, according to local media reports. Doctors don't know the origin of the cancer, which has invaded Menino's liver and lymph nodes, the Boston Globe reported . Menino was mayor of Boston for 20 years. He retired this year after a series of health woes hobbled him while still in office, none of which were reported as cancer-related. In one dramatic moment last year, a wheelchair-bound Menino improbably  rose to his feet to address thousands of mourners during an interfaith service after the Boston Marathon bombings.
SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | By Dan Loumena
Mike Schmidt, perhaps the greatest third baseman in baseball history and a harsh critic of players using performance-enhancing drugs, sat down with reporters Saturday to discuss his recovery from skin cancer. "I'm a very lucky man," said the former Philadelphia Phillies slugger and Hall of Famer about his battle with stage 3 melanoma. “I've done just about everything I can to destroy the cancer cells in my body.” The 64-year-old had two operations and went through the usual rounds of chemotherapy and radiation treatments.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2009 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
Weekday mornings, Mona Rosenberg joins about a dozen technicians and fellow oncologists in a circle in the back room of her clinic to prepare for the day's cancer patients. They open the patients' files and fire off questions and suggestions about treatment. It's the kind of meeting that could happen in any clinic but with an important difference: The patients at Rosenberg's Veterinary Cancer Group have four legs.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Even as Republican presidential candidates vow to dismantle what they call "Obamacare" -- the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 -- some of the law's key provisions are making their way onto the medical landscape. The latest step toward implementing the law came Thursday, as the Food and Drug Administration issued draft rules that will open the U.S. marketplace to "biosimilars" -- essentially generic versions of medications made with living, often bioengineered, organisms.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Obesity is probably a factor in some of the almost 22,000 new diagnoses of ovarian cancer that will be handed out this year to American women, a new study says. The finding adds ovarian cancer, the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies, to a growing list of diseases linked to carrying far too much weight. Research has found obesity to contribute to a person's risk for a wide range of illnesses, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancers of the breast, colon, pancreas and esophagus.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Angelina Jolie knows that she can appear to be a bit austere in the public eye, but when she's at home, the brunet beauty says, she relaxes and makes sure to have fun. The 38-year-old actress-director, who appears in character for "Maleficent" on this week's issue of Entertainment Weekly, told the mag she's a different person at home. "Outside my home I can be somewhat serious," Jolie said ( via People). "We laugh and we play, and I'm light again, and I'm a kid again, and I'm loving and soft again, because they've brought that back in my life.
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