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Cancer

BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Rancho Feeding Corp., the Bay Area slaughterhouse that recalled nearly 9 million pounds of beef products last month, sold meat that came from cows with cancer, according to documents obtained by The Times.  In a Jan. 14 suspension letter, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service said that an investigation of Rancho Feeding Corp. showed the company sold cattle "likely affected with epithelioma of the eye. "  Regulators said they found two cattle heads that had made it to market intact and with "skin still attached, and had no incisions for the four pair of lymph nodes on the head, which normally are incised for inspection.
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SCIENCE
March 5, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
A long-term study of men diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer in the late 1980s and 1990s concludes that those who were treated with surgery were much less likely to die of the disease -- or of anything else --than those whose prostates were left in place and received close monitoring from their doctors. The study , which appears in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, also finds that the more time that passed since their diagnosis, the greater the benefits of early surgery became.
SCIENCE
March 4, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Consuming high levels of protein - particularly animal protein - is a bad strategy if you're at midlife and aiming to live into old age, new research finds. But a study out Tuesday reveals that in older age, fortifying one's diet with more protein-rich foods appears to be a formula for extending life. An article published in the journal Cell Metabolism says that, over an 18-year study period, middle-aged Americans who had the highest consumption of protein were more than four times as likely to die of cancer or diabetes, and twice as likely to die of any cause, than those whose diets were lowest in protein.
SCIENCE
February 25, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
If you are taking vitamin supplements to reduce your risk of heart disease or cancer, a government panel of health experts wants you to know that you're probably wasting your money. In some cases, those vitamins may actually increase your risk of cancer. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force came to this conclusion Monday after reviewing dozens of studies, including many randomized clinical trials, considered the gold standard for medical research. The task force's final recommendation was published online Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
SPORTS
February 24, 2014 | By Houston Mitchell
Former WWE superstar Jake "The Snake" Roberts, who will be inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in April, has a cancerous tumor behind his knee that needs to be removed. Roberts told TMZ.com that he will have surgery Tuesday morning. "If the devil can't defeat me, cancer doesn't stand a chance! Pray for sick children who face this horrible disease 'cause the Snake will be just fine," said Roberts, who spent years battling drug and alcohol abuse. Roberts was famous for carrying a boa constrictor named Damien to the ring for his matches and for making the DDT a popular move.
SCIENCE
February 18, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
A team of researchers from the City of Hope in Duarte has developed a speedy way to identify drugs and chemicals that can disrupt the balance of sex hormones in human beings and influence the development and progress of diseases such as breast cancer. In a trial screening of 446 drugs in wide circulation, the new assay singled out the popular antidepressant paroxetine (better known by its commercial name, Paxil) as having a weak estrogenic effect that could promote the development and growth of breast tumors in women.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Nicole Sperling
PITTSBURGH - Most movie sets orbit around one key individual. Usually, it's the director or the star. Occasionally, it's a heavyweight producer. Seldom is it the writer of the movie's source material. But John Green is not just any writer. On a crisp day in early October as cameras rolled on Fox 2000's film adaptation of his 2012 novel "The Fault in Our Stars," a bestselling love story about two wry, cancer-stricken teenagers, the 36-year-old author was exerting a strong gravitational pull.
HOME & GARDEN
February 14, 2014 | By Jim Cox
I have to make sure when I get hold of happiness to seize the moment and soar to heights with it. I am grateful that I can still be joyful at times with simple and new things that were not significant to me before. - Bien Cox, journal entry The "new normal" arrived April 9, 2008. The painful lump in Bien's left breast was malignant. Cancer. The phone, the unholy messenger, was put back in its cradle, and we sat on the couch for a few moments. Tears came and went. Disbelief remained.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Women considering a mastectomy after being diagnosed with breast cancer often face a difficult decision: whether to remove their healthy breast as well. A new study should make it easier for some of these women to make up their minds. It concludes that patients with a dangerous mutation in their BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene were able to cut their risk of dying from breast cancer nearly in half by opting to remove both breasts. The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes contain instructions for producing tumor suppressor proteins, which repair damaged DNA and keep cells from turning cancerous.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
NBC News special correspondent Tom Brokaw revealed on Tuesday that he has been diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a type of cancer than affects the white blood cells in bone marrow. The 74-year-old former anchor of "NBC Nightly News" is currently contributing to the network's Winter Olympics coverage in Sochi. He released a statement through the network. "With the exceptional support of my family, medical team and friends, I am very optimistic about the future and look forward to continuing my life, my work and adventures still to come," he says.
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