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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Seeking to distance himself from the problems that led his former boss to resign, a candidate for Los Angeles County sheriff offered to roll up his pants and prove he does not have a tattoo. Patrick Gomez' offer at a debate in Pasadena on Sunday was followed by a challenge from the moderator to the other candidates -- not necessarily to show skin but to say whether they had ever been members of a Sheriff's Department clique. Under former Sheriff Lee Baca, deputies allegedly formed cliques with names like "Grim Reaper" and "Regulators," using tattoos to cement membership bonds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
A field of candidates - many political heavyweights and city insiders - are locked in an expensive battle to become Long Beach's newest mayor, a job that comes with expectations of reviving both the port city's economy and reputation. The April 8 election has candidates vying for city attorney and a majority of Long Beach's nine council seats, setting the stage for one of the most significant shake-ups in city politics in more than a decade. But all eyes are on the mayor's race, and with the crowded field a June runoff is likely.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By Jessica A. Levinson
Thank you, Supreme Court. Before your decision Wednesday in McCutcheon vs. FEC, Americans were confined to giving a measly total of $48,600 in campaign contributions to federal candidates (enough for about nine candidates) and a total of $74,600 to political action committees. That means individuals were subject to aggregate contributions limits totaling a mere $123,200. Of course, individuals could, and still can, give unlimited sums to independent groups, such as so-called super PACs and other nonprofit corporations.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
Thanks to state Sen. Leland Yee's alleged attempts to broker illegal gun deals for campaign contributions, candidates for California's secretary of state are suddenly getting a lot of attention and news coverage. Yee is out of the race, although his name will still appear on the ballot in the June primary. But his scandal is giving some candidates an opportunity, if they choose to use it. On Tuesday, Dan Schnur called a news conference in Sacramento in which he denounced lawmakers for failing to pursue meaningful reforms after the recent ethics scandals among legislators.
OPINION
March 31, 2014 | By Bill Whalen
Now that the California Senate has voted to suspend three of its members, all accused or convicted of criminal wrongdoing, legislators hope the issue will quickly vanish. And that's precisely the problem with this action. Giving three senators a "time out" - with pay - allows the rest of the members a chance to express outrage, genuine or feigned. However, it doesn't begin to address a larger question: Are these merely three bad apples, or is the larger orchard that is California's Legislature rotten to its core?
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
It's that time of the year again, when candidates for elected office push the limits of their imagination and public gullibility with ballot designations. California gives candidates three words to describe their principal profession, vocation or occupation on the ballot, and the freedom to create one's persona and potentially sway public perception leads to some creative designations. However, there are enough checks in the system to ensure candidates don't mislead voters: The choice of words has to pass muster with elections officials and can be challenged in court, which is why we have several recent instances in which ballot designations have been rejected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge Friday ruled that a front-runner in the race for county assessor can't call himself a "deputy assessor" on the ballot. Candidate Omar Haroon, an appraiser in the assessor's office, had filed a court case contending that the occupation listed by rival candidate Jeffrey Prang, a West Hollywood councilman who also works as a public affairs manager for the county agency, was misleading. The assessor's office does not use "deputy assessor" as an official job title.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
Candidates competing to be the next Los Angeles County assessor tangled in their first public debate Sunday over tax policy and the best way to reform the office after a scandal that led to the arrest of the current assessor. But they were largely united in their criticism of one candidate who was not present: Jeffrey Prang, a West Hollywood councilman and special assistant in the assessor's office, who is so far the front-runner in fundraising and endorsements. Twelve candidates are running to replace Assessor John Noguez, who is on leave and fighting charges that he had property values reduced for campaign contributors.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
LAS VEGAS - Long before voters begin paying attention to the 2016 presidential contest, the quiet race for the Republican Party's most elite donors was well under way in recent days as potential candidates made a pilgrimage west to court prolific spender Sheldon Adelson and other members of the Republican Jewish Coalition. During speeches Saturday, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, Ohio Gov. John Kasich and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie all addressed the key concerns of Adelson and many group members - the threat of a nuclear Iran, their desire to strengthen U.S. ties with Israel, and what they view as the waning prestige of the U.S. abroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
A Los Angeles County sheriff's candidate who is one of the department's highest-ranking officials was chastised for using a mock ethnic accent during a joke phone call played at a retirement party, internal sheriff's records show. In the 2010 incident, a recording of which was obtained by The Times, Assistant Sheriff James Hellmold calls a station watch commander and appears to imitate a vaguely South Asian accent. He criticizes the watch commander while mispronouncing words in a sing-songy rambling rant, according to the recording.
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