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Candy Lightner

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NEWS
January 26, 1994 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Candy Lightner went to work at a consulting firm that represents restaurants that serve alcohol, she considered the job compatible with her past as the crusading founder of Mothers Against Drunk Driving. But that hasn't been the media perception. In a sudden wave of publicity this month, Lightner has found herself portrayed in news stories and on talk shows as having joined the enemy.
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NEWS
April 2, 2000 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a bereaved mother launched a national campaign against drunk driving in 1980, no one expected that alcohol-related fatalities would drop 40% over the next 20 years. Yet Mothers Against Drunk Driving has helped achieve that and more, becoming a potent symbol for other advocacy groups. In this first of two stories on motherhood and activism, Southern California Living examines MADD's accomplishments, growing pains and future as the organization celebrates its 20th anniversary.
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NEWS
October 4, 1985 | Associated Press
Candy Lightner, who founded Mothers Against Drunk Driving after her daughter was killed by a drunken driver in 1980, said Thursday that the board has taken away her titles as its chairwoman and chief executive officer. She remains president and chief spokeswoman of the group. Lightner, 39, said that she had been working without a contract since June 30 and that the board had forbidden her to deal with the 360 chapters on pending business. It gave no reason for its actions.
NEWS
January 26, 1994 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Candy Lightner went to work at a consulting firm that represents restaurants that serve alcohol, she considered the job compatible with her past as the crusading founder of Mothers Against Drunk Driving. But that hasn't been the media perception. In a sudden wave of publicity this month, Lightner has found herself portrayed in news stories and on talk shows as having joined the enemy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1986
Orange County MADD wishes to clarify the position of Mothers Against Drunk Driving on Proposition 51, since our founder, Candy Lightner, has made personal statements against the proposition. At the state meeting on April 19, 1985, the vote of all of the California chapters was to take a neutral position on Proposition 51. From the very founding of MADD, chapters have never become involved in civil court matters--other than advocating for the return of liability for retailers of alcohol who serve alcohol to an obviously intoxicated person, who then drives and kills or injures another.
NEWS
March 7, 1986
The original chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving in Sacramento is broke, and the chapter president lays part of the blame on MADD founder Candy Lightner. Marcia Dauenhauer, president of the Sacramento-Placer County chapter, said contributions have dwindled to a trickle and "as of today, we can't pay the rent." Dauenhauer said MADD's image was tarnished by a power struggle between Lightner and the organization's board of directors last fall that eventually led to Lightner's resignation.
NEWS
October 12, 1985 | From a Times Staff Writer
Norma Phillips, an Escondido businesswoman and president of the San Diego chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving, was named Friday as president and chief spokeswoman of the national organization, replacing Candy Lightner, the ousted founder of the organization. Phillips, 47, whose only son was killed by a drunk driver on Thanksgiving Day, 1981, founded the San Diego chapter a year later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
A transcontinental walk-a-thon intended to dramatize the need for stronger measures against drunk drivers will begin Aug. 17 on the steps of Los Angeles City Hall, the founder of Mothers Against Drunk Driving announced Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1987
Recently, Tom Gorman did an article entitled "Head of MADD Tempers Group's Image to Keep Message Alive" (March 22). Mr. Gorman interviewed me for this article and I would like to point out at least one quote that he took out of context. I explained to Mr. Gorman when we did the interview that I could not disparage MADD due to my contract with this organization. I also told him that I would not do so and I would refer to "the movement" every time we talked about drunk driving since I thought there is much more to the anti-drunk driving crusade than just MADD.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Candy Lightner, founder and former president of Mothers Against Drunk Driving, voiced opposition Tuesday to Proposition 51, the so-called "deep pockets" initiative on the June 3 ballot, calling the measure "brutally unfair" to injury victims. Backers of the measure were quick to alert reporters that Lightner was not speaking on behalf of MADD, the national organization founded in 1980. The pro-51 campaign noted that MADD is officially neutral on the issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1987
Recently, Tom Gorman did an article entitled "Head of MADD Tempers Group's Image to Keep Message Alive" (March 22). Mr. Gorman interviewed me for this article and I would like to point out at least one quote that he took out of context. I explained to Mr. Gorman when we did the interview that I could not disparage MADD due to my contract with this organization. I also told him that I would not do so and I would refer to "the movement" every time we talked about drunk driving since I thought there is much more to the anti-drunk driving crusade than just MADD.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1986
Orange County MADD wishes to clarify the position of Mothers Against Drunk Driving on Proposition 51, since our founder, Candy Lightner, has made personal statements against the proposition. At the state meeting on April 19, 1985, the vote of all of the California chapters was to take a neutral position on Proposition 51. From the very founding of MADD, chapters have never become involved in civil court matters--other than advocating for the return of liability for retailers of alcohol who serve alcohol to an obviously intoxicated person, who then drives and kills or injures another.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Candy Lightner, founder and former president of Mothers Against Drunk Driving, voiced opposition Tuesday to Proposition 51, the so-called "deep pockets" initiative on the June 3 ballot, calling the measure "brutally unfair" to injury victims. Backers of the measure were quick to alert reporters that Lightner was not speaking on behalf of MADD, the national organization founded in 1980. The pro-51 campaign noted that MADD is officially neutral on the issue.
NEWS
April 16, 1986 | PATRICK MOTT
The five panelists were, each of them reiterated, the bearers of bad news--stories of murder, rape, child molestation and abduction, alcoholism and drug abuse. Not the sort of presentation, supposedly, that would go down well in competition with lighter topics on how to buy a home, cultivate good business manners and lose weight. But with the bad news came emotional, sometimes tearful pleas for action along with expressions of hope, and an estimated 2,000 taut-faced women attending state Sen.
NEWS
March 7, 1986
The original chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving in Sacramento is broke, and the chapter president lays part of the blame on MADD founder Candy Lightner. Marcia Dauenhauer, president of the Sacramento-Placer County chapter, said contributions have dwindled to a trickle and "as of today, we can't pay the rent." Dauenhauer said MADD's image was tarnished by a power struggle between Lightner and the organization's board of directors last fall that eventually led to Lightner's resignation.
NEWS
October 12, 1985 | From a Times Staff Writer
Norma Phillips, an Escondido businesswoman and president of the San Diego chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving, was named Friday as president and chief spokeswoman of the national organization, replacing Candy Lightner, the ousted founder of the organization. Phillips, 47, whose only son was killed by a drunk driver on Thanksgiving Day, 1981, founded the San Diego chapter a year later.
NEWS
April 16, 1986 | PATRICK MOTT
The five panelists were, each of them reiterated, the bearers of bad news--stories of murder, rape, child molestation and abduction, alcoholism and drug abuse. Not the sort of presentation, supposedly, that would go down well in competition with lighter topics on how to buy a home, cultivate good business manners and lose weight. But with the bad news came emotional, sometimes tearful pleas for action along with expressions of hope, and an estimated 2,000 taut-faced women attending state Sen.
NEWS
April 2, 2000 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a bereaved mother launched a national campaign against drunk driving in 1980, no one expected that alcohol-related fatalities would drop 40% over the next 20 years. Yet Mothers Against Drunk Driving has helped achieve that and more, becoming a potent symbol for other advocacy groups. In this first of two stories on motherhood and activism, Southern California Living examines MADD's accomplishments, growing pains and future as the organization celebrates its 20th anniversary.
NEWS
October 4, 1985 | Associated Press
Candy Lightner, who founded Mothers Against Drunk Driving after her daughter was killed by a drunken driver in 1980, said Thursday that the board has taken away her titles as its chairwoman and chief executive officer. She remains president and chief spokeswoman of the group. Lightner, 39, said that she had been working without a contract since June 30 and that the board had forbidden her to deal with the 360 chapters on pending business. It gave no reason for its actions.
NEWS
October 3, 1985 | Associated Press
Candy Lightner, who founded Mothers Against Drunk Driving after her daughter was killed by a drunk driver, said today she has been pushed aside and is no longer running the national crusade that now has 350 chapters in the United States. The MADD executive committee has taken control of the organization and her contract has not been renewed, said Lightner, 39, who reportedly drew a $76,000-a-year salary. "Communications have broken down with these people," she said.
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