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Cannabis

OPINION
May 1, 2005
Re "Pot Laws Pain Some Elders," Column One, April 28: As a three-time cancer survivor living on sheer determination, I wouldn't wish cancer on my worst enemy. Drug czar John Walters wants to compare pot with cocaine and thinks they are similar in a burst of euphoria? In my 20s, I tried cocaine and did not like its effect on me, so I quit immediately. I have smoked marijuana at times through my 20 years of battling cancer, and found it to be comforting and mostly helpful against nausea and other ill effects from chemotherapy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2008 | Eric Bailey
Two men accused by federal prosecutors of using profits from a medical cannabis dispensary to fuel a lavish lifestyle have been found guilty of conducting a criminal enterprise, authorities said. Luke Anthony Scarmazzo and Ricardo Ruiz Montes, both 28, made more than $9 million in three years of operating the Modesto dispensary before their arrest in 2006. They face a mandatory sentence of 20 years to life. U.S. Atty. McGregor Scott said Friday that the pair hid behind California's medical marijuana law but broke state and federal drug laws.
OPINION
January 22, 2007
Re "DEA raids marijuana outlets," Jan. 18 As a California citizen, I found it disturbing to read Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton's promise to work with federal authorities in usurping the will of the California electorate. As a glaucoma patient relying on cannabis medically, it is my intent to see dispensaries propagate and thrive. It is the federal law that is wrong. Cannabis prohibition is irrational in a nation with Starbucks, much less thriving alcohol and tobacco industries.
OPINION
June 6, 2007
Re "Not enough marijuana," editorial, May 31 One only hopes that the Drug Enforcement Administration sees the irony in Judge Mary Ellen Bittner's decision to allow for the private production of cannabis for government-approved research. While unfettered access to marijuana is only a phone call away for millions of U.S. teens, it remains out of reach for qualified researchers who wish to study its therapeutic utility in clinical trials. Chalk up another victory for America's misguided pot policies.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
For years, his seed catalogs were scrutinized by discerning cannabis cultivators across the U.S. and Canada, much like the ladies of Cumbria might fuss over Chiltern's inventories of sweet peas and heirloom tomatoes. There was Blue Heaven pot, capable of producing a "euphoric, anti-anxiety high," or Crown Royal, whose "flower tops come to a flat golden crown, sparkling with gems of THC," or Hawaiian Sativa, with its "menthol flavor that tingles the taste buds and tickles the brain."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011
SERIES The Truth Behind…: Using a mix of witness accounts, historical documents and modern research and testing, the new episode "UFOs" looks for the truth about unidentified flying objects (7 and 10 p.m. National Geographic). The Office: Maura Tierney guest stars in this new episode as Robert's (James Spader) wife, whom he brings to the office in hopes of finding her a job. Rainn Wilson, Ed Helms, John Krasinski and Angela Kinsey also star (9 p.m. NBC). Weed Wars: This new series goes inside the workings of the nation's largest medical cannabis dispensary, the Harborside Health Center in Oakland, which serves more than 94,000 patients (10 p.m. Discovery)
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
This week, Colorado replaced mile marker 420 after it was repeatedly stolen following the state's legalization of marijuana. Why? Could be because 420 is pop-culture code for cannabis. The Colorado Department of Transportation assumed it was being lifted by “weed enthusiasts,” according to NBC News. To combat further theft, the department altered the sign to “MILE 419.99.” The reasons behind 420's association with pot are relatively unknown, short of a few theories involving 1970s California hippie kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1998 | LINDA LEE CADWELL
I was personally offended by Alison Dakota Gee's article about my late husband, Bruce Lee ("Dragon Days," Calendar, July 20). Purporting to commemorate the flourishing of his legacy 25 years after his death, The Times' story sank to the depths of tabloid journalism in sensationalizing the life and death of an extraordinarily gifted human being. Having been married to Bruce for nine years and being the mother of our two children, I am more than qualified to give a correct recital of the facts.
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