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Canola

BUSINESS
July 2, 1991 | DANIEL AKST
Not all of California's most promising newcomers are people. Lost in a sea of more conventional bounty, 3,000 acres of a seed-bearing plant called canola are growing in the Yolo County area near Sacramento. Three thousand acres isn't much, but keep watching. Brassica napus is one of the most promising new crops in California. It makes one of the healthiest cooking oils around, and it takes just a fraction of the water required by many other major crops grown in the region.
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FOOD
June 28, 1990 | JOAN DRAKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: I'm 76 years old and have an elevated cholesterol level. I make a lot of popcorn, and since my popper calls for oil, I've been using extra-virgin olive oil. The other day a friend told me canola oil was 99% cholesterol free. Is that right? And how does it compare to olive oil?
BUSINESS
September 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
Canola may become an economic lifesaver for farmers in the South and Midwest as the low-fat cooking oil squeezed from the plant's seeds becomes more popular with health-conscious consumers. Canola oil is lower in saturated fat than other popular cooking oils, including coconut, soybean and corn oils, experts say. Saturated fat has been linked to cholesterol, a substance that can contribute to clogged arteries and heart disease.
FOOD
June 22, 1989 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: Is there a difference between Chinese and Japanese soy sauce? And what about light and dark soy sauces? Answer: According to Bruce Cost, author of "Bruce Cost's Asian Ingredients" (William Morrow & Co., 1988: $22.95), "The Chinese invented soy sauce, and the Japanese learned the technology from them. "The Chinese, particularly in the south, use both light and dark soy sauce. The latter is aged longer, and toward the end of the processing is mixed with bead molasses, which gives it a darker, caramel-like hue. You can think of them as you would red and white wine, since as a rule, dark soy flavors (and colors)
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