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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1989 | DAVID BURKE
Teachers, administrators and school board members say they have recommitted themselves to helping students raise their California Assessment Program test scores. District students placed near the bottom of the list on recent CAP tests when compared to other Orange County districts. "I don't think we should ever be below the 50th percentile," said school board president Nancy Zinberg. "We should have a stated goal of the 75th percentile, or better."
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SPORTS
January 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
This was the kind of wide-open, back-and-forth scoring spree Brett Hull and Mario Lemieux love. Goals 34 seconds apart. Three tying goals in the third period, with the last one coming 1:06 after a go-ahead goal. Then, after 10 even-strength goals, a four-on-three winner in overtime.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1989 | TIM WATERS and HUGO MARTIN, Times Staff Writers
Officials at West High School in Torrance are debating whether to ask state education officials to revise the school's California Assessment Program test score because a group of seniors intentionally flunked the exam. Assistant Supt. Arnold Plank said Wednesday that the state Department of Education has indicated it would be willing to help West High recalculate the score by pulling the scores of students the school suspects of deliberately flunking. The department also indicated it would consider substituting the new score for the old one if the school can document carefully how it determined who flunked the test on purpose, Plank said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1992
The 1992 California Assessment Program scores have been released, and Orange County's eighth-graders didn't fare as well as they did two years ago. Nor, for that matter, did their peers in California as a whole. But there were bright spots on which Orange County school officials can build. In many schools, for example, students exhibited good writing skills--often better than the reading skills. This at first seems puzzling because the two are so closely tied.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California Assessment Program tests, a staple of the state's educational efforts for more than a decade, offer telling nuggets of information about schools and their progress. But it takes a practiced eye to pick out the significance in the results, and experts warn that scores can be easily misinterpreted. To help avoid that, educators strongly caution against reading too much significance into small yearly shifts in a school's averages.
NEWS
May 18, 1989
HOW TO READ THE SCORES The information on high- and low-performing schools is based on average math and reading scores on the 1987-88 California Assessment Program test taken by 3rd- and 6th-graders, and the average of scores in five CAP subject areas taken by 8th-graders in the state. The listings below show how individual schools performed on the CAP tests compared to schools of similar background (based on such indicators as parents' education and income level, the number of families receiving welfare assistance and the number of limited-English-speaking students)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1986
Your article on the California Assessment Program ("Test Goals Unmet at Many Schools," June 20 by Pam Moreland) cited one major deficiency in using CAP scores to judge the quality of schools. State Supt. Bill Honig feels that year-to-year improvement in these scores is a very important indicator of educational quality, and state law provides a special grant to schools that show such improvement. However, when the CAP scores at a school are already quite high, it is very hard to show further improvement each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1986 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
For the second consecutive year, the performance of California's eighth-graders on the California Assessment Program test marred what otherwise would have been an excellent back-to-school report card for the state's elementary school children. Results of the statewide standardized test released Tuesday--the day that more than 4 million California students returned to classes--showed that third- and sixth-graders bettered their scores in reading, math and written expression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1988
Like Los Angeles school district Associate Supt. Paul Possemato ("40 Grade Schools Cheated on Skill Tests, State Finds," Part I, Sept. 1), I understand why a teacher might assist students taking the California Assessment Program test. The use of a single standardized test to evaluate years of education and to assess the quality of teaching is enough to make any teacher shudder. Teachers know first-hand that an hour's worth of testing can only caricature the hundreds of hours they and their students have invested in one another and that some of the most important skills students learn are less than readily quantifiable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
Elementary and junior high schools in San Diego County have met or exceeded state performance targets for measuring educational improvements in greater numbers than public schools statewide, California schools Supt. Bill Honig said in data released today. The performance targets are based on reading and math standardized test scores for grades three, six and eight under the California Assessment Program, the major annual measure of the state's educational pulse. At grade three, 70% of all San Diego County schools--and 74% of San Diego city schools--ranked in the top category of Honig's measurements, contrasted with 56.5% of all California schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992 | LORNA FERNANDES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tracking a statewide pattern that has educators concerned, the achievement test scores of South Bay eighth-graders slipped this year but remained higher than the Los Angeles County average. Of the 31 South Bay schools that administered the California Assessment Program test, only nine improved their scores since the last test was administered two years ago. The other 22 schools showed an overall decline in the testing, which covered reading, writing, math, science and history-social science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1992
How to Read the Scores These are California Assessment Program test scores earned by eighth-graders in some Ventura County public schools last spring. The maximum score possible is 400 points. Ch2 Column: These figures show the rise or fall of tests scores since the last CAP test was given in 1989-90. Chb Column: These figures show the rise or fall of tests scores since the first CAP test was given in 1985-86. Statewide Avg. Read Write Math Hist. Sci.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1992
How to Read the Scores Appearing on this page are the results of the 1992 California Assessment Program test for eighth-graders. Here is a guide on how to read the scores: * Five areas were tested: Reading, writing, mathematics, history/social science and science. Schools are listed alphabetically and by district. Scores are scaled roughly between 100 and 400, although some scores may be higher or lower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1991
Here are California Assessment Program writing scores earned by eighth-graders in some San Diego County public schools last spring. The previous year's scores also are provided for comparison purposes, although CAP officials warn against reading too much into one-year variations. The scaled score is a combination of results on each of the various types of writing tasks assigned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1991 | GEORGE HATCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a dramatic surge in scores at San Pedro's Dana Junior High to a sizable drop-off at Carson's Carnegie Junior High, South Bay students turned in a wide range of performances in last year's statewide writing test for eighth-graders. In the California Assessment Program test, students were given 45 minutes to write on an assigned subject in categories including biography, observation and autobiographical incident.
NEWS
January 16, 1991 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State schools Supt. Bill Honig likes to say that hard work pays off for teachers toiling to improve the writing skills of their students. In releasing the latest results today of the state's essay test for eighth-graders, Honig might find no better example of his point than Montgomery Junior High in Linda Vista, where an emphasis on having students write often and on a wide variety of topics resulted in a 77-point gain in the school's total score on the spring 1990 exam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1985
The article ("Faculty Threatens to Silence Paper," March 28) has some interesting implications. That Cleveland High School's math faculty is so "touchy" about criticism indicates that they may have some real doubts about their teaching skills. Those who are confident about their performance rarely react so defensively and, in fact, would welcome such a discussion to help pinpoint areas which could use improvement. The larger issue, of course, is that of freedom of speech. The Times article indicated that the criticism was a student reporter's opinion, not a news story citing fact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
More than two-thirds of Orange County elementary and intermediate schools were rated "high performers" in a new analysis of scores from the California Assessment Program, according to a study released this week by State Supt. of Education Bill Honig's office. The study of third-, sixth- and eighth-grade scores was designed as the first definitive measure of statewide school performance since 1983, when the Legislature adopted a massive education reform package, according to William L. Ruckeyser, a special assistant to Honig.
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