Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCapital Markets
IN THE NEWS

Capital Markets

FEATURED ARTICLES
AUTOS
May 17, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Tesla Motors shares are trading at about $90 and could easily top $100, buoyed by its ability to tap capital markets for about $1 billion through its announced sale of stock and convertible notes. It is an impressive performance that will help the Palo Alto-based electric car company expand sales abroad, develop its Model X, a sport utility, and start work on a less expensive vehicle that would extend its customer base and manufacturing volumes, analysts said. It will also use the money to pay off a $465-million Department of Energy loan that became a political hot potato after the 2011 bankruptcy of Solyndra, the Fremont, Calif., solar panel maker, that cost taxpayers more than $400 million.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 23, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Mark Warner on Friday called on the Securities and Exchange Commission to conduct a "thorough investigation" of the Nasdaq Stock Market's three-hour trading outage. Warner (D-Va.), a member of the Senate Banking Committee, said Thursday's technological problem was "troubling. " In a letter to SEC Chairwoman Mary Jo White, he asked her to investigate and report back to Congress about how to avoid future problems. "Securities markets need prudent regulation to ensure their integrity," wrote Warner, a former venture capitalist.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 26, 1995 | From Associated Press
Merrill Lynch & Co. on Wednesday tapped its capital markets head David Komansky as president and chief operating officer in a move that grooms him to be the next chairman of the nation's largest securities firm. The positions, which recently have been vacant, previously were held by Daniel P. Tully, who took over as chairman last year. Tully, who is also chief executive, is expected to retire in 1997, when he turns 65.
AUTOS
May 17, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Tesla Motors shares are trading at about $90 and could easily top $100, buoyed by its ability to tap capital markets for about $1 billion through its announced sale of stock and convertible notes. It is an impressive performance that will help the Palo Alto-based electric car company expand sales abroad, develop its Model X, a sport utility, and start work on a less expensive vehicle that would extend its customer base and manufacturing volumes, analysts said. It will also use the money to pay off a $465-million Department of Energy loan that became a political hot potato after the 2011 bankruptcy of Solyndra, the Fremont, Calif., solar panel maker, that cost taxpayers more than $400 million.
OPINION
March 11, 1990 | ROBERT KUTTNER, Robert Kuttner is economics correspondent of the New Republic
The jitters that have rocked the Tokyo stock market should give Americans pause. In a single day late last month, the value of the Tokyo exchange plummeted 4.5%, the second-worst crash ever.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2000 | Reuters
Bank One Corp. said it had some bookkeeping problems in 1999 as it integrated the computer systems of the capital markets operations of the two banks that merged to form Bank One, the nation's fourth-largest bank holding company. However, the bank declined to comment on a report in the Wall Street Journal that said the problems have prompted an investigation by the regulatory arm of the National Assn.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
$3 Billion Sought From Capital Markets: Vietnam is planning to tap international capital markets for the first time in order to raise capital in the years ahead, according to a senior Finance Ministry official. "From selling government bonds, we hope to raise between $2 billion and $3 billion by the year 2000," said treasury official Le Thi Bang Tam.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Beijing Files With SEC to Sell Bonds: Overcoming its longtime reluctance to tap into international capital markets, the nation took an initial step toward its first worldwide bond offering. The Beijing government filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to sell $1 billion of 10-year bonds, to be underwritten by Merrill Lynch & Co. Previously, China has avoided capital markets and relied on international borrowing.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
Ina Drew, the JPMorgan Chase & Co. executive who headed the bank's unit responsible for a stunning $2 billion trading loss, will retire, the bank announced. Chief Investment Officer Drew will step down after more than 30 years with the bank, though the bank's announcement did not specify when she would depart. A source familiar with the situation told The Times on Sunday that Drew had offered repeatedly to resign and that her resignation would likely be accepted this week.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Michael Hiltzik
It's a measure of how successful Wall Street has been at eviscerating the so-called Volcker Rule that in its current guise it would not have prevented JPMorgan Chase from making the derivatives trades that produced the stunning $2-billion trading loss disclosed this week. Even in its weakened loophole-ridden state, the rule, which prohibits banks from making risky trades for their own accounts, has been raked with gunfire from Jamie Dimon, the JPMorgan chairman who presided over that loss.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - China may be the world's second-largest economy, but its financial system still answers to strict state controls that critics say hold back the country's development. The free market plays little role in determining howChina'scurrency is valued, how banks set interest rates or how much capital is allowed to flow in and out of the country. But in the last two weeks, a series of moves has raised hopes that financial freedoms could be expanding in the so-called bird cage economy.
SPORTS
November 23, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
Steve Garvey and Orel Hershiser have attracted more than enough financial backing to bid competitively on the Dodgers, the banker representing the former Dodgers stars said Wednesday. "It's a matter of picking the partners we want," said Darren Lowe of RBC Capital Markets, the investment banking arm of the Royal Bank of Canada. For the first time, one of those partners has identified himself. Joey Herrick, president of Pacoima-based Natural Balance Pet Foods, said Wednesday that he has agreed to become a minority investor in the Garvey-Hershiser venture.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper
Goldman Sachs Group Inc.'s public relations problems don't seem to be hurting its ability to do business. In the first quarter of this year, as its image woes intensified, the firm had more success than any other investment bank in attracting clients, data tracker Dealogic reported Tuesday. Goldman was the most popular bank for advising clients involved in mergers and acquisitions -- up from No. 3 last year, Dealogic said. The bank came in second in the rankings of firms in the capital markets sector, which includes underwriting stock offerings.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2009 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
Charles Clow has some advice for the Obama administration on how to get the U.S. out of the recession. "The wheels here need to be greased," Clow said. "People have to want to spend money again and that's our problem -- they don't want to spend money. We need to increase government spending and cut income taxes and payroll taxes and get money flowing."
BUSINESS
March 26, 1985
Thomas J. Healey resigned as assistant secretary of the Treasury for domestic finance, fulfilling plans to return to private business after the reelection of President Reagan. Healey did not elaborate on his plans. He was director of capital markets for Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. before joining the Administration.
OPINION
July 27, 2008 | William Voegeli, William Voegeli is a visiting scholar at Claremont McKenna College's Henry Salvatori Center.
Americans are souring on the idea of free markets, according to some newspaper reports. Gas at more than $4 a gallon, plummeting home values, a volatile stock market, tightening credit and mounting job losses are said to have undermined the consensus, politically dominant for a generation, that the heavier burden of proof falls on those who want the government to intervene to correct the market, rather than on those who believe that the market should be allowed to correct itself.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2007 | TOM PETRUNO
Wall Street moved close to the precipice this week, only to be pulled back by renewed faith that the government can fix what ails the financial system. That faith had ebbed away in November, and it's an encouraging sign that investors are willing to give it another shot -- because it has become increasingly clear that the financial system isn't likely to fix itself. Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Donald L.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|