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Capital Punishment Massachusetts

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NEWS
February 9, 1994 | Reuters
Gov. William F. Weld on Tuesday called for reinstatement of the death penalty after two police officers in the state were shot and killed within a week. Weld refiled a broad package of anti-crime legislation, first proposed in 1991, calling for restoration of the death sentence and mandatory life sentences for repeat felons convicted of violent crimes.
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NATIONAL
November 6, 2003 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
In a case that has fueled the debate over capital punishment in Massachusetts, federal prosecutors on Wednesday asked a jury to impose the death penalty on a 44-year-old drifter who confessed to murdering three good Samaritans. Gesturing toward Gary Lee Sampson, Assistant U.S. Atty. George Vien told the jury: "This man sitting right here in the blue shirt is a cunning, manipulative, cold-blooded killer who preyed on the good-hearted.
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NEWS
November 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Massachusetts Gov. William F. Weld submitted legislation to restore the death penalty for a broad range of murders. Weld, a Republican and former federal prosecutor, had promised during his campaign that he would try to restore the death penalty. The state's highest court ruled capital punishment unconstitutional seven years ago. Under the proposed legislation, 12 types of murder would be eligible for the death penalty.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | Reuters
Gov. William F. Weld on Tuesday called for reinstatement of the death penalty after two police officers in the state were shot and killed within a week. Weld refiled a broad package of anti-crime legislation, first proposed in 1991, calling for restoration of the death sentence and mandatory life sentences for repeat felons convicted of violent crimes.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2003 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
In a case that has fueled the debate over capital punishment in Massachusetts, federal prosecutors on Wednesday asked a jury to impose the death penalty on a 44-year-old drifter who confessed to murdering three good Samaritans. Gesturing toward Gary Lee Sampson, Assistant U.S. Atty. George Vien told the jury: "This man sitting right here in the blue shirt is a cunning, manipulative, cold-blooded killer who preyed on the good-hearted.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2003 | Eric Slater, Times Staff Writer
In Massachusetts, which has no state death penalty law and where no one has been executed in more than half a century, a federal jury on Tuesday sentenced a drifter to die for the slayings of two men who had stopped to help after he feigned being a stranded motorist.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Death penalty opponents here realized a narrow victory last year when a push to reinstitute capital punishment lost by a single vote in the state House of Representatives. With the conviction last week of one of two defendants in the especially horrific murder of a 10-year-old child, that margin may grow shakier still. "Clearly, the case has had a major impact," said newly elected Republican Gov. Paul Cellucci.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
As Christians worldwide commemorated the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, Cardinal Roger M. Mahony called on Catholics on Friday to fight the death penalty. At a news conference at the offices of the Los Angeles Roman Catholic Archdiocese, Mahony, who is chairman of the U.S. Catholic bishops' Domestic Policy Committee, presented a statement calling for an end to capital punishment.
NATIONAL
May 14, 2005 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Serial killer Michael Bruce Ross was put to death by lethal injection early Friday in Somers, Conn. It was the first execution in New England in almost 50 years. Ross, 45, had abandoned all appeals, insisting that he deserved to die for the murders of eight young women in New York and Connecticut in the 1980s. He was pronounced dead at 2:25 a.m. His lawyer, T.R. Paulding Jr., told a news conference at the prison: "In the end, Mr. Ross maintained his dignity as he sought to do what was right."
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Massachusetts Gov. William F. Weld submitted legislation to restore the death penalty for a broad range of murders. Weld, a Republican and former federal prosecutor, had promised during his campaign that he would try to restore the death penalty. The state's highest court ruled capital punishment unconstitutional seven years ago. Under the proposed legislation, 12 types of murder would be eligible for the death penalty.
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