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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1991
Although Mathews and Wilmington refer to the "Capra-corn" factor running through Capra's films, they make the same mistake that Capra made in his self-indulgent autobiography, "The Name Above the Title": ascribing all the credit to Capra! What about Robert Riskin, who is polished off in one brief, cursory notation as Capra's "frequent writer-collaborator"? In the early '70s, Calendar ran an article about writer-directors; Riskin was listed among the early pioneers in that category.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By M.G. Lord
Propaganda today has a nasty connotation; it suggests something cheesy, manipulative, in the service of a dishonorable cause. During World War II, however, cinematic propaganda became an elevated art, practiced with unusual expertise by five great American movie directors: John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra and George Stevens. Hitler threw down the gauntlet with Leni Riefenstahl's "Triumph of the Will" (1935), propaganda so captivating that it impelled even gentle Germans to thump their chests.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
The new film "Promised Land," written by and starring Matt Damon and John Krasinski (the pair also produce with Chris Moore), uses the hot-button issue of fracking - a method of natural gas extraction that utilizes a high-pressure mixture of water and chemicals to break up underground rocks and release the gas - as the backdrop against which to explore nothing less than the current state of American identity. Directed by Gus Van Sant, the film drills down to the question of how we decide who we are. "If people want to internalize it as a political issue movie, they are going to and we're not going to be able to stop them," said Krasinski.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Frank Capra is best known for the three films for which he won the directing Oscar - 1934's "It Happened One Night," 1936's "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town" and 1938's "You Can't Take It With You" - and the ultimate Christmas flick, 1946's "It's a Wonderful Life. " But only the most ardent Capra fanatic is familiar with his 1929 film "The Donovan Affair," the first all-talking motion picture he directed for Columbia Pictures. " Nobody knows this movie," said Bruce Goldstein, director of repertory programming at New York's Film Forum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1987
Capra's deliberate decision to risk Horowitz's life rather than to permit a gunman to "hold the station hostage" was incredibly cruel as well as stupid. To Horowitz's protest, "But I could have been killed," Capra's response, "You can always get out of the business" calls for immediate firing. The mentally ill gunman, using a toy pistol, which Capra took to be lethal, showed a higher regard for human life. Of the two, I consider Capra the more dangerous. PAULINE ROSS Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1997 | SHARON MOESER
A traffic stop Sunday morning led to the arrests of three suspects in a $112,000 computer heist, authorities reported. Los Angeles Police Officers Holly Capra and Brendan McCarty noticed that a Honda Accord traveling on Willis Avenue had expired registration tags, according to Capra. The officers pulled over the car, which was carrying three men and five boxed computers, Capra said. The driver told the officers his girlfriend had bought the computers for her Pasadena business.
NEWS
July 28, 1985
Perhaps I had unreasonable expectations when KCOP announced the airing of my all-time favorite movie, Frank Capra's "It's a Wonderful Life." However, the way the station handled it was a disgrace to Capra's storytelling genius, hacking away five key scenes that add greatly to the power and sensitivity of the plot. Why didn't KCOP postpone "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous" for a week and allow enough time to show the entire film in addition to the many commercials? Both Capra and the film's leading man, James Stewart, have said that this is their favorite movie.
MAGAZINE
November 11, 1990
I will begin by letting you know how much pleasure, relaxation and, sometimes, a little irritation the Puzzler provides me each week. I very rarely succeed in completing the crossword, but that does not detract from the enjoyment of trying. Have the Puzzlers, Sylvia Bursztyn and Barry Tunick, ever been published in book form, thus providing everlasting entertainment for the crossword fanatic? If they have, I have tried and cannot find them. I would appreciate details of how I can obtain such a compilation.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | MAX JACOBSON, Max Jacobson is a free-lance writer who reviews restaurants weekly for The Times Orange County Edition.
1992 was another dynamic, interesting year in the world of Orange County restaurants, with an emphasis on lower prices and far-flung ethnic specialties. The 25 dishes I have chosen as my favorites from the past year reflect current trends--their average price is even lower than that of last year and little, other than roast chicken, scones, shoofly pie and sour cherry cobbler, would likely ever find its way onto a middle American family's table.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
The new film "Promised Land," written by and starring Matt Damon and John Krasinski (the pair also produce with Chris Moore), uses the hot-button issue of fracking - a method of natural gas extraction that utilizes a high-pressure mixture of water and chemicals to break up underground rocks and release the gas - as the backdrop against which to explore nothing less than the current state of American identity. Directed by Gus Van Sant, the film drills down to the question of how we decide who we are. "If people want to internalize it as a political issue movie, they are going to and we're not going to be able to stop them," said Krasinski.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012
Although DVD releases tend to focus on recent box-office successes, it can be more interesting to look at those that provide rarities not easily available until now. One new boxed set is so on this wavelength, it's even got the word in its title: “Universal Rarities: Films of the 1930s.” On tap here are major stars in earlier roles: Mae West appearing with Duke Ellington in “Belle of the Nineties,” Jack Benny starring in “Artists &...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2011
These acclaimed actors worked multiple times for the director. Barbara Stanwyck The Oscar-nominated legend made five films with Capra, including 1941's "Meet John Doe. " Gary Cooper The star earned his first Oscar nomination for Capra's 1936 "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town. " He also starred in "Meet John Doe. " Bing Crosby "Der Bingle" teamed up with Capra for the 1950 comedy "Riding High" and the 1951 romantic farce "Here Comes the Groom. "
NEWS
December 13, 2010 | By Casey Chan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Surrounded by desert, director Frank Capra once lounged in a cozy casita near Palm Springs and penned the 1946 snowy holiday classic “ It’s a Wonderful Life .” Who knew? The La Quinta Resort & Club wants to make sure you do by offering a special holiday deal. The deal: The offer, called " It’s Always a Wonderful Life at La Quinta ,” gives you a third night free when you stay two nights. Decorations at the resort, through Christmas, will honor the snowy fictional town of Bedford Falls, and the film will be screened for free on Saturday nights in the resort’s theater.
SPORTS
September 4, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
The first indication that it isn't always rain that creates havoc with tennis tournaments came when 18-year-old Beatrice Capra had to chase down her lime green visor, which had been blown off her head in Arthur Ashe Stadium. With gusts hitting 22 mph at the U.S. Open on Saturday, a ball might occasionally do a little shimmy, a little shake in the air, as if it were auditioning for "Dancing With the Stars. " A flying visor was the least of Capra's problems. Maria Sharapova, the 2006 U.S. Open champion who is seeded No. 14 this year, beat Capra, 6-0, 6-0. Better tennis is predicted in the fourth round because Sharapova will get a shot at top-seeded Caroline Wozniacki, the 2009 runner-up who was similarly untested in her 6-1, 6-0 win over Yung-Jan Chan of Taiwan.
SPORTS
September 2, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
Andy Roddick is out of the U.S. Open, and lately when Roddick is eliminated from major tournaments, it's the end of American men in the draw. But here Thursday there was 19th-seeded Mardy Fish gliding around the Louis Armstrong Stadium court using his sweet touch, able to time his volleys, willing to change the pace on his groundstrokes. Combined with a late-career decision to become supremely physically fit, the 28-year-old Fish looks rejuvenated, especially after his 7-5, 6-0, 6-2 victory over Pablo Cuevas in his second-round match.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The film landscape is changing so quickly these days with lively debates over whether to shoot in 3-D or 2-D or use digital or traditional film cameras. But a new UCLA Film and Television Archive series, "From Nitrate to Digital: New Technologies and the Art of Cinema," illustrates that technological change is the norm in Hollywood. The program, which opens Saturday at the Billy Wilder Theater, "is about reminding people that the industry has been through these changes before and Hollywood and artists have adapted and adopted to those transitions," notes programmer Paul Malcolm.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2010
‘From Silent to Sound' Everyone knows that silent films gave way to sound ones, but that transition didn't happen at the snap of a finger. For a few years, studios produced both silent and sound versions of the same feature. This UCLA Film & Television Archive program offers the unprecedented opportunity to see the surprisingly dissimilar sound and silent versions of the 1930 circus melodrama "Rain or Shine," both directed by Frank Capra. The different choices Capra made in the two mediums couldn't be more fascinating.
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