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Caprice Spencer Rothe

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caprice Spencer Rothe had a hand--actually two long, slender ones--in the making of one of history's most popular and enchanting mass-entertainments, "E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial." Now she is grappling with one of the 20th century's most celebrated and complex plays, "Heartbreak House" by George Bernard Shaw. Rothe (pronounced row-thee) is directing the 80-year-old work's current revival at the Vanguard Theatre in Fullerton. In "E.T.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caprice Spencer Rothe had a hand--actually two long, slender ones--in the making of one of history's most popular and enchanting mass-entertainments, "E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial." Now she is grappling with one of the 20th century's most celebrated and complex plays, "Heartbreak House" by George Bernard Shaw. Rothe (pronounced row-thee) is directing the 80-year-old work's current revival at the Vanguard Theatre in Fullerton. In "E.T.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1999 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
Computers and their effect on the minds and curiosity of growing children will be discussed at a conference Saturday aimed at parents and teachers. Jane M. Healy, author and educational consultant from Vail, Colo., will be the keynote speaker at the event, called "Kids, Intelligence & Computers." She will address the concept that computer use should be limited until age 9 so that kids can learn problem-solving skills the old-fashioned way, through hands-on experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1997 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The musical "Popeye the Sailor," notes director Caprice Spencer Rothe, has more to do with E.C. Segar's original comic strip than do subsequent animated versions. This is valuable information, because it's doubtful that anyone stepping inside the charmingly snug New England-style Maritime Center at the Orange County Marine Institute would have heard of the stage musical. Arriving just four years after Robert Altman's dubious movie musical version, the 1984 R.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2001
8pm Music Chinese composer Tan Dun wrote a Concerto for Erhu and Chamber Orchestra for Ang Lee's acclaimed film, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon." But the work was not included in the movie. Orange County gets to hear the world premiere, along with the West Coast premiere of his Concerto for Water Percussion and Orchestra. Dun will conduct. The soloists will include Karen Han, erhu (an ancient Chinese instrument akin to the violin), and David Cossin, water percussionist.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Director Beth Hansen has tossed a fair amount of screwball shtick into the Newport Theatre Arts Center's revival of "The Fantasticks." Some of it works, some of it doesn't, but at least it tends to dilute much of the gooey whimsy in this popular musical. The show, with lyrics by Tom Jones and music by Harvey Schmidt, has been playing in New York City's Greenwich Village since 1960. Before there was "Cats" and "A Chorus Line," this was the one the out-of-towners put on their must-see lists.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Peter Shaffer's play "Amadeus" attests to the fact that the playwright was trained as a composer. It also shows in his other plays by their musical form and frequently soaring, melodic dialogue. The best example is his early drama "Equus," a sort of fugue in aberrations, a sonata examining the far reaches of sanity. It would be hard to find another production of the play that understands this musicality better than the Vanguard Theatre Ensemble's.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Silent-film director D.W. Griffith used a lot of plots from classics for his early two-reel films, but he always changed the title and characters' names. At Fullerton's Vanguard Theatre, director Elizabeth Swenson has taken Moliere's "The Imaginary Invalid" and staged it as though it's a silent film, but she made the mistake of not changing the title or the role names.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1994 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When British playwright Timberlake Wertenbaker decided to write a feminist play, she went whole hog. In "The Love of the Nightingale," at the Vanguard Theatre, she goes back to an ancient Greek myth in which Tereus, the young King of Thrace, has come to the aid of the King of Athens in a war, and as a reward is given the King's daughter Procne's hand in marriage. After she bears his son, Tereus loses interest in Procne, who wants her sister Philomele brought from Athens to keep her company.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2005 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
In a throwback to "Playhouse 90," a classic drama program from the 1950s "Golden Age of Television," Orange County public television station KOCE aims to launch a regular series of live stage plays to be performed and simultaneously broadcast from its studios in Huntington Beach -- a gambit apparently unique on the current broadcast television landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1997 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The darndest things wash up from the deep blue sometimes. This weekend, treasure hunters can find two refugees from the high seas right in their own backyard: Popeye, the world's oldest salt and star of a musical opening Friday in Dana Point, and pirate Hippolyte Bouchard's, whose 1818 raid on Mission San Juan Capistrano is reeancted Saturday. For Bouchard's sake, let's just hope to two don't cross paths. Even though Popeye's getting close to 70, we hear he still throws a mean punch.
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