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Captive Breeding

NEWS
July 3, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The gangly young whooping crane flapped its gawky wings and began chasing a wingless ultralight aircraft around and around a circular pen. Only 55 days old but already 20 inches tall, it had been taken from its parents before it hatched and trained to see the tiny flying machine as its mom. Monday's demonstration at the Patuxent Research Refuge in Maryland was part of a project to help preserve one of the world's rarest birds. The fledgling is one of 10 birds in an experimental U.S.
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NEWS
March 25, 2001 | RODRIQUE NGOWI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Under the muffled roar of water and a steady mist, the rare Kihansi spray toad has thrived high in a remote gorge, blissfully unaware of the turmoil its discovery has caused among environmentalists, World Bank officials and electricity-starved Tanzanians. Nearby villagers believe that the unique, thumbnail-size creature has magical powers and that their future is directly tied to the toad, whose scientific name is Asperginus nectophrynoides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2001
Genetic engineering may not be any more effective than conventional breeding at increasing the growth of farmed trout, according to Canadian researchers. Molecular biologist Robert Devlin and his colleagues at Fisheries and Oceans Canada inserted the gene for a growth hormone into a slow-growing strain of rainbow trout and found that the engineered fish grew much more rapidly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fox population on islands in the Channel Islands National Park has dropped 90% in six years, scientists said, making the house cat-sized fox one of North America's most imperiled canines. Scientists are considering expanding a captive-breeding program on Santa Cruz Island. And last weekend, scientists flew veterinarians to Santa Rosa Island to treat a cancer-stricken female fox who may not have lived through the next breeding cycle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worried by the dramatic decline in the population of foxes on two islands off the Ventura County coast, federal scientists are studying the rare breed on Santa Cruz Island to see if they should expand a captive-breeding program there. Over the past six years, the number of island foxes found on two islands in the Channel Islands National Park--San Miguel and Santa Rosa--has decreased by more than 90%, scientists said, making the house-cat-sized fox one of North America's most imperiled canines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2000 | LEON DROUIN KEITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spanish settlers unwittingly began making an ecological bomb here a century and a half ago. Turn-of-the-century sheepherders added to it. DDT-spraying farmers finished the job. The fuse burned until the last half of the 1990s, when the bomb took out thousands of docile and unwary island foxes. The catastrophe has brought the island fox--one of the world's smallest foxes but the largest mammal unique to California--to the brink of extinction in Channel Islands National Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1999
The mystery surrounding the paternity of three baby chimpanzees at the Los Angeles Zoo was finally solved Thursday when DNA results were released. Despite a vasectomy in 1996, Shaun, an 11-year-old chimpanzee, is definitely the father, zoo officials announced. He is responsible for the birth of all three chimps during the past year: Toshi, Jean and Jake. The mystery began Jan. 31 when a female chimpanzee was born. None of the zookeepers had noticed that her mother was pregnant.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The mother of a baby panda left her den long enough to allow biologists to see that the cub is a girl. The two-week-old female cub is starting to show distinct markings, with some dark coloring around her shoulders. The cub remains nameless, however. The San Diego Zoo, where the panda was born Aug. 21, has submitted a request to China to name the cub Tian Yi, a gender-neutral name that means "Gift of Heaven."
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Possessed of wisdom derived from disappointment, Chinese diplomat An Wenbin waited several days before venturing here to see the panda cub born Saturday. When he finally made the trip Thursday, An was buoyant: The cub continues to defy the odds against survival for pandas born in captivity. "This is very exciting," said An, his country's consul general in Los Angeles. "From the people of China, I want to offer congratulations to the world-famous San Diego Zoo."
NEWS
July 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
Members of the Wild Crocodile Skiing Club used to water-ski fearlessly on the rivers of Venezuela's Great Plains because their main nemesis, the Orinoco crocodile, was nearly extinct. But now they've put their skis away because the massive reptiles are making a comeback. Conservationists are raising baby Orinocos in captivity and releasing them into the wild to try to bring back the species.
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