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Captive Breeding

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2003 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Nobody knows exactly how long giant panda Bai Yun has been pregnant, and there is some question about who the father is. Still, officials at the San Diego Zoo were beaming like expectant parents Monday, eagerly awaiting the birth of black-and-white twins due this month. If all goes well, the birth would mark a rare success in panda reproduction, and also could help the zoo boost attendance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports.
Veterinarians at SeaWorld have, for the first time, produced two bottlenose dolphins by using once-frozen sperm to artificially inseminate their mothers. Officials at the theme park announced Thursday that the two calves, one male and one female, had been born in May to bottlenose dolphins who had been impregnated with sperm from a dolphin used by the U.S. Navy. Previously, bottlenose dolphins have been bred through artificial insemination with fresh semen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2003 | Deborah Sullivan Brennan, Special to The Times
When wildlife authorities entered the grounds of Jon Weinhart's home in April and found scores of dead and malnourished tigers, they opened a window into what some experts describe as an underground industry in exotic pets. Weinhart, the owner of a wildlife facility called Tiger Rescue, and his partner, Marla Smith, were charged with illegally breeding tigers and keeping a menagerie of big cats in unhealthy conditions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Avian specialists from the San Diego Zoo will assist scientists in Hawaii in a last-ditch effort to save one of the world's rarest birds, the po'ouli, found only on the slopes of Haleakala Volcano in Maui, Hawaii. Only two females and one male are known to exist. The zoo, which has a program to help save Hawaii's endangered forest bird species, will be part of a captive breeding program in Hawaii.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2002 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the Los Padres National Forest, where plunging canyons meet towering sandstone pinnacles, the first in a new generation of California condors toddles around a small cave, flapping its stubby wings. Across the valley, biologist Mike Barth peers through a telescope. "My nightmare," he says, squinting in the sun, "is that chick will take its first flight up that canyon and right into a power line."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2002 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first California condor brooded and hatched in the wild in 18 years was stained with oil this week, raising concerns about the chick's long-term health and the effect on the ambitious, $35-million program to reintroduce the huge black birds into the wilderness. Biologists observing the chick in Los Padres National Forest near Fillmore say the father apparently stuck its own head in a puddle of crude oil, then flew back to the nest where the oil got on the chick's white, downy feathers.
NEWS
December 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
He weighs a manageable 23 pounds but will grow to at least 275. He looks cuddly and cute, but his teeth will grow to 3 inches long. And someday he will be strong enough to kill a person with a slap of his paw. None of that mattered to Cai Murrah, 5, who waited in the cold for more than 40 minutes for a look at Berani, the National Zoo's latest star. Cai, in town with his family from Kentucky to visit his grandmother for the holidays, said he just wanted to see the new cat in town.
NEWS
August 28, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the outside, there appears to be a panda baby boom going on in China. Three mothers each have given birth to twins. If 10 other females come through, this could be one of the best recent years for the endangered species. But the mood is hardly euphoric at one breeding ground, the Wolong Giant Panda Protection Research Center in Sichuan province. "This is definitely not a harvest for us," Zhang Guiquan, deputy director of the center, said by telephone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apparently unpregnant but still charismatic, Bai Yun is back on display. The annual panda fertility watch is over. Attempts at artificial insemination have failed and Bai Yun, a 10-year-old giant panda, is no longer confined to her maternity area in the backstage part of the panda grotto at the San Diego Zoo.
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