Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCaptive Breeding
IN THE NEWS

Captive Breeding

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fox population on islands in the Channel Islands National Park has dropped 90% in six years, scientists said, making the house cat-sized fox one of North America's most imperiled canines. Scientists are considering expanding a captive-breeding program on Santa Cruz Island. And last weekend, scientists flew veterinarians to Santa Rosa Island to treat a cancer-stricken female fox who may not have lived through the next breeding cycle.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worried by the dramatic decline in the population of foxes on two islands off the Ventura County coast, federal scientists are studying the rare breed on Santa Cruz Island to see if they should expand a captive-breeding program there. Over the past six years, the number of island foxes found on two islands in the Channel Islands National Park--San Miguel and Santa Rosa--has decreased by more than 90%, scientists said, making the house-cat-sized fox one of North America's most imperiled canines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2000 | LEON DROUIN KEITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spanish settlers unwittingly began making an ecological bomb here a century and a half ago. Turn-of-the-century sheepherders added to it. DDT-spraying farmers finished the job. The fuse burned until the last half of the 1990s, when the bomb took out thousands of docile and unwary island foxes. The catastrophe has brought the island fox--one of the world's smallest foxes but the largest mammal unique to California--to the brink of extinction in Channel Islands National Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1999
The mystery surrounding the paternity of three baby chimpanzees at the Los Angeles Zoo was finally solved Thursday when DNA results were released. Despite a vasectomy in 1996, Shaun, an 11-year-old chimpanzee, is definitely the father, zoo officials announced. He is responsible for the birth of all three chimps during the past year: Toshi, Jean and Jake. The mystery began Jan. 31 when a female chimpanzee was born. None of the zookeepers had noticed that her mother was pregnant.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The mother of a baby panda left her den long enough to allow biologists to see that the cub is a girl. The two-week-old female cub is starting to show distinct markings, with some dark coloring around her shoulders. The cub remains nameless, however. The San Diego Zoo, where the panda was born Aug. 21, has submitted a request to China to name the cub Tian Yi, a gender-neutral name that means "Gift of Heaven."
NEWS
July 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
Members of the Wild Crocodile Skiing Club used to water-ski fearlessly on the rivers of Venezuela's Great Plains because their main nemesis, the Orinoco crocodile, was nearly extinct. But now they've put their skis away because the massive reptiles are making a comeback. Conservationists are raising baby Orinocos in captivity and releasing them into the wild to try to bring back the species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human interference has degraded the island habitat so severely that many foxes inhabiting remote Channel Islands National Park must be removed from the wild and placed in captivity to save them from extinction, federal officials said Wednesday. Numbers of island foxes found at the park off the Ventura County coast have plummeted by 90% in the past four years, making the diminutive animal one of North America's most imperiled canine species.
NEWS
April 24, 1999 | Associated Press
Oregon on Friday banned "canned hunting," the practice of keeping exotic animals in a fenced compound and charging hunters to come in and shoot them. The seven-member Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission voted unanimously to end the practice. The only known place in Oregon to offer canned hunting is the 3,500-acre Clover Creek Ranch in the Ochoco Mountains. There, hunters have paid to bag such prey as Russian boar, Hawaiian black sheep and Israeli ibex goats.
NEWS
March 14, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are the first couple of panda-dom, but theirs has not been a loving or (re)productive relationship. She is young, frisky, fecund. He is middle-aged, sedentary, still potent but uninterested in launching his DNA delivery system. There is not another couple like them in North America. They do not lack for visitors.
NEWS
February 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
The San Diego Zoo will work with a Mexican counterpart to breed endangered giant pandas in captivity, authorities said. The zoo's Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species has signed a first-time agreement with the Chapultepec Zoo to artificially inseminate a panda there. In the next few weeks, if China approves, San Diego Zoo researchers will deliver sperm from their male panda, Shi Shi, to inseminate one of three females at the Mexican facility.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|